Monday, December 26, 2011

ENG 282: 1940s

1940

Abe Lincoln in Illinois (USA: John Cromwell, 1940: 110 mins)

Tudor, Deborah. "The hysteric, the mother, the natural gal — male fantasies and male theories in films about Lincoln." Jump Cut #55 (Fall 2013)

Fantasia (USA: Disney Studios, 1940: 124 mins)

Kutner, C. Jerry. "FANTASIA (1940) – The Varieties of Religious Experience." Bright Lights After Dark (October 25, 2011)

LoBrutto, Vincent. "Animation and Music: Fantasia." Becoming Film Literate: The Art and Craft of Motion Pictures. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2005: 136-143. [BCTC Library: PN1994 L595 2005]

Foreign Correspondent (USA: Alfred Hitchcock, 1940: 120 mins)

Harris, Mark. "Hitchcock During Wartime." The Current (February 19, 2014)

The Grapes of Wrath (USA: John Ford, 1940: 129 mins)

Sánchez-Escalonilla, Antonio. "From Hoover to Bush Jr.: Home and Crisis Scripts in U.S. Social Cinema." Jump Cut #55 (Fall 2013)

His Girl Friday (USA: Howard Hawks, 1940: 92 mins)

Kuersten, Erich. "Quilty Makes This World: 12 Tricksters (CinemArchetype #1)." Acidemic (January 23, 2012)

The Philadelphia Story (USAL George Cukor, 1940: 112 mins)

Ray, Robert B. "The Philadelphia Story." The ABCs of Classic Hollywood. NY: Oxford UP, 2008: 85-156.

Rebecca (USA: Alfred Hitchcock, 1940: 130 mins)

Callahan, Dan. "Judith Anderson: Dame Vengeance." The Chiseler (January 2014)

"The Criterion Blogathon: Rebecca (1940)." Phyllis Loves Classic Movies (November 18, 2015)

Kuersten, Erich. "CinemArchetype #2: The Anima." Acidemic (January 29, 2012)

The Westerner (USA: William Wyler, 1940: 100 mins)

McGee, Patrick. From Shane to Kill Bill: Rethinking the Western. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2007.[Professor has copy]

1941

The Lady Eve (USA: Preston Sturges, 1941: 94 mins)

Reginald, Stephen. "Preston Sturges and The Lady Eve." Classic Movie Man (November 15, 2015)

The Maltese Falcon (USA: John Huston, 1941: 100 mins)

Naremore, James. "Film Acting and the Arts of Imitation." Cyncos 27.2 (2011) ["Louise Brooks once said that in order to become a star, an actor needs to combine a natural-looking behavior with personal “eccentricity.” My presentation will explore some of the analytical problems raised by this phenomenon: What constitutes eccentricity and how is it balanced by naturalness in specific cases? What happens when a movie star acts in a film in which he or she impersonates the eccentricities of another star (Larry Parks as Al Jolson, Clint Eastwood as John Huston, Cate Blanchett as Bob Dylan, Meryl Streep as Julia Child, etc.)? How can we distinguish between impersonation as caricature and impersonation as dramatic illusion? What is the difference, if any, between impersonation and stylistic influence?"]

Ray, Robert B. "The Maltese Falcon." The ABCs of Classic Hollywood. NY: Oxford UP, 2008: 157-244.

Man Hunt (USA: Fritz Lang, 1941: 105 mins)

Rivas, T.J. "Cinematic Responses to Fascism." Film History and Aesthetics Wiki (A Project of Film 110: Introduction to Film History and Aesthetics at Westminster College)

Meet John Doe (USA: Frank Capra, 1941: 122 mins)

Bateman, Conor. "The Secret Video Essays of Jenni Olson." Keyframe (Posted on Vimeo: April 2016)

Never Give a Sucker an Even Break (USA: Edward Cline, 1941: 71 mins)

Kuersten, Erich. "CinemArchetype #4: The Hanged Man." Acidemic  (February 12, 2012)

Sullivan's Travels (USA: Preston Sturges, 1941: 90 mins)

Longworth, Karina. "Veronica Lake (Dead Blondes Episode 4)." You Must Remember This (February 20, 2017) ["Veronica Lake had the most famous hairdo of the 1940s, if not the twentieth century. Her star turn in Preston Sturges’ Sullivan’s Travels and her noir pairings with Alan Ladd made her Paramount’s biggest wartime draw behind Hope and Crosby, but behind the scenes, Lake was a loner with a drinking problem who didn’t give an F about Hollywood etiquette. Bankrupt and without a studio contract, in the early 1950s she consciously quit movies. She claimed she left Hollywood to save her own life -- so how did she end up dead at 50?"]

The Wolf Man (USA: George Waggner, 1941: 70 mins)

Kuersten, Erich. "CinemArchetype #7: The Shadow." Acidemic (March 8, 2012)



1942

The Eternal Jew (Germany: Fritz Hippler, 1942: 62 mins)

Presner, Todd. German 59: Holocaust in Film and Literature (2010 UCLA course posted on Youtube: February 10, 2010)

The Glass Key (USA: Stuart Heisler, 1942: 85 mins)

Kuersten, Erich. "The Veronica Lake Effect." Acidemic #7 (2012)

The Great Love (Germany: Rolf Hansen, 1942: 102 mins)

Brockmann, Stephen. "Die grofse Liebe (1942) or Love and War." A Critical History of German Film Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2010: 167-179. [Professor has copy of the book]

I Married a Witch (USA: René Clair, 1942: 77 mins) 



Longworth, Karina. "Veronica Lake (Dead Blondes Episode 4)." You Must Remember This (February 20, 2017) ["Veronica Lake had the most famous hairdo of the 1940s, if not the twentieth century. Her star turn in Preston Sturges’ Sullivan’s Travels and her noir pairings with Alan Ladd made her Paramount’s biggest wartime draw behind Hope and Crosby, but behind the scenes, Lake was a loner with a drinking problem who didn’t give an F about Hollywood etiquette. Bankrupt and without a studio contract, in the early 1950s she consciously quit movies. She claimed she left Hollywood to save her own life -- so how did she end up dead at 50?"]

Jungle Book (USA/UK: Zoltan Korda, 1942: 108 mins)

Harvey, Dennis. "Sabu’s Enduring Star Power." Keyframe (January 5, 2014)

The Magnificent Ambersons (USA: Orson Welles, 1942: 88 mins)

White, Mike, et al. "The Magnificent Ambersons Production History." (Posted on Vimeo: 2014) ["Orson Welles's follow-up to Citizen Kane adapted Booth Tarkington's Pulitzer prize-winning novel about industrial progress and the loss of innocence set against a tumultuous family, the Ambersons. Welles infamously lost control of The Magnificent Ambersons before its final release. We'll examine its production, its destruction, and attempts to restore what many consider Welles's forgotten masterpiece."]

This Gun For Hire (USA: Frank Tuttle, 1942: 81 mins)

Kuersten, Erich. "The Veronica Lake Effect." Acidemic #7 (2012)

To Be or Not to Be (USA: Ernst Lubitsch, 1942: 99 mins)

Marsh, Calum. "Can Humor Be Weaponized? We speak of satire as ‘venomous’ and ‘acerbic,’ but it isn’t the damage it deals that makes it significant." Keyframe (April 10, 2016)

Rivas, T.J. "Cinematic Responses to Fascism." Film History and Aesthetics Wiki (A Project of Film 110: Introduction to Film History and Aesthetics at Westminster College)

1943

Above Suspicion (USA: Richard Thorpe, 1943: 90 mins)

Rivas, T.J. "Cinematic Responses to Fascism." Film History and Aesthetics Wiki (A Project of Film 110: Introduction to Film History and Aesthetics at Westminster College)

Day of Wrath (Denmark: Carl Theodor Dreyer, 1943: 97 mins

Dreyer, Carl Theodor. "Thoughts on My Metier." The Current (August 20, 2001)

Wilkins, Budd. "Birthing Bad: Lars Von Trier’s Antichrist Through the Lens of “Nordic Horror." Acidemic #7 (2012)

Hangmen Also Die! (USA: Fritz Lang, 1943: 134 mins)

Rivas, T.J. "Cinematic Responses to Fascism." Film History and Aesthetics Wiki (A Project of Film 110: Introduction to Film History and Aesthetics at Westminster College)

I Walked with a Zombie (USA: Jacques Tourneur, 1943: 69 mins)



Kuersten, Erich. "CinemArchetype #2: The Anima." Acidemic (January 29, 2012)


Shadow of a Doubt (USA: Alfred Hitchcock, 1943: 108 mins)

"Director Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘Shadow of a Doubt’ – ‘Psycho’ – ‘The Birds’." Sound on Sight #309 (February 29, 2012)

Starr, Elana Rose. "Alfred Hitchcock: Auteur Filmmaker." Villanova University (ND)

1944

Cobra Woman (USA: Robert Siodmak, 1944: 71 mins)

Kuersten, Erich. "CinemArchetype #7: The Shadow." Acidemic (March 8, 2012)

Double Indemnity (USA: Billy Wilder, 1944: 107 mins)

D'Angelo, Mike. "Double Indemnity." A.V. Club (August 9, 2009)

LoBrutto, Vincent. "Film Noir: Double Indemnity." Becoming Film Literate: The Art and Craft of Motion Pictures. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2005: 122-128. [BCTC Library: PN1994 L595 2005]

Gaslight (USA: George Cukor, 1944: 114 mins)

Dahl, Nel. "The Handmaiden by Gaslight: Park Chan-wook’s gothic female-vengeance drama owes a debt to George Cukor." Keyframe (October 19, 2016)

To Have and Have Not (USA: Howard Hawks, 1944: 100 mins)

Hudson, David. "Sex in the Movies." Green Cine (2005)

Laura (USA: Otto Preminger, 1944: 88 mins)

Kuersten, Erich. "CinemArchetype #2: The Anima." Acidemic (January 29, 2012)

Meet Me in St Louis (USA: Vincent Minelli, 1944: 113 mins)

Collier, Stuart, Brian Risselada and Tom Sutpen. "Vincente Minnelli: The Beginning (1943-1948)." Illusion Travels by Streetcar #18 (June 12, 2014)

Ray, Robert B. "Meet Me in St Louis." The ABCs of Classic Hollywood. NY: Oxford UP, 2008: 245-328.

National Velvet (USA: Clarence Brown, 1944: 123 mins)

Kuersten, Erich. "CinemArchetype #3: The Animus." Acidemic (February 1, 2012)


1945

I Know Where I Am Going (United Kingdom: Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1945: 91 mins)

Smith, Imogen Sara. "The Music of Words: Storytelling in Two Powell & Pressburger Films." Bright Lights Film Journal #79 (February 2013)

The Men Who Tread on the Tiger's Tail (Japan: Akira Kurosawa, 1945: 59 mins)

Vahdani, Alireza. "The effects of Kabuki on Akira Kurosawa’s Auteurism, Pt 1." and Part 2 Offscreen (October 31, 2010)

Mildred Pierce (USA: Michael Curtiz, 1945: 111 mins)

D., Margo and Margo P. "Mildred Pierce by J.M. Cain and Starring Joan Crawford." Book vs Movie (April 14, 2017)

Longworth, Karina. "Six Degrees of Joan Crawford: The Middle Years (Mildred Pierce to Johnny Guitar)." You Must Remember This (August 29, 2016) ["Joan Crawford struggled through what she called her “middle years,” the period during her 40s before she remade herself from aging, slumping MGM deadweight into a fleet, journeywoman powerhouse who starred in some of the most interesting films about adult womanhood of the 1940s and 1950s. That revival began with Mildred Pierce (for which Crawford won her only Oscar), and included a number of films, such as Daisy Kenyon and Johnny Guitar, directed by men who would later be upheld as auteurs, subversively making personal art within the commercial industry of Hollywood."]


1946

Beauty and the Beast (France: Jean Cocteau, 1946: 96 mins)

Kuersten, Erich. "CinemArchetype #3: The Animus." Acidemic (February 1, 2012)

Steegmuller, Frances. "Beauty and the Beast." Current (from Cocteau: A Biography Boston: Atlantic-Little, Brown, 1970)

The Best Years of Our Lives (USA: William Wyler, 1946: 172 mins)

Kinder, Bill. "When Soldiers Come Home in the Movies: The post-war experience as told in tropes." Keyframe (November 11, 2015)

The Big Sleep (USA: Howard Hawks, 1946: 114 mins)

Chatterjee, Parma. "A Tale of Two Bookshops: Sex and Books and The Big Sleep." Bright Lights Film Journal #82 (November 2013)

Klevan, Andrew. "Expressing the In-Between." LOLA #1 (2011)

Duel in the Sun (USA: King Vidor, 1946: 144 mins)

McGee, Patrick. From Shane to Kill Bill: Rethinking the Western. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2007.[Professor has copy]

Gilda (USA: Charles Vidor, 1946: 110 mins)

Hudson, David. "Sex in the Movies." Green Cine (2005)

Kuersten, Erich. "CinemArchetype #2: The Anima." Acidemic (January 29, 2012)

It's a Wonderful Life (USA: Frank Capra, 1946: 130 mins)

Sánchez-Escalonilla, Antonio. "From Hoover to Bush Jr.: Home and Crisis Scripts in U.S. Social Cinema." Jump Cut #55 (Fall 2013)

The Jolson Story (USA: Alfred E. Green, 1946: 128 mins)

Naremore, James. "Film Acting and the Arts of Imitation." Cyncos 27.2 (2011) ["Louise Brooks once said that in order to become a star, an actor needs to combine a natural-looking behavior with personal “eccentricity.” My presentation will explore some of the analytical problems raised by this phenomenon: What constitutes eccentricity and how is it balanced by naturalness in specific cases? What happens when a movie star acts in a film in which he or she impersonates the eccentricities of another star (Larry Parks as Al Jolson, Clint Eastwood as John Huston, Cate Blanchett as Bob Dylan, Meryl Streep as Julia Child, etc.)? How can we distinguish between impersonation as caricature and impersonation as dramatic illusion? What is the difference, if any, between impersonation and stylistic influence?"]

Let There Be Light (USA: John Huston, 1946: 58 mins)

Jones, Kent. "To Tell the Truth: Let There Be Light." Reverse Shot (June 22, 2003)

The Murderers are Among Us (Germany: Wolfgang Staudte, 1946: 85 mins)

Brockmann, Stephen. "Die Mörder sind unter uns (1946): The Rubble Film." A Critical History of German Film Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2010: 196-210. [Professor has copy of the book]

The Living Dead (BBC: Adam Curtis, 1995: three 60 minute episodes) ["The Living Dead: Three Films About the Power of the Past is a series of films that investigate the way that history and memory (both national and individual) have been manipulated and distorted by politicians and others for various means of control."]

My Darling Clementine (USA: John Ford, 1946: 97 mins)

McGee, Patrick. From Shane to Kill Bill: Rethinking the Western. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2007.[Professor has copy]

Night and Day (USA: Michael Curtiz, 1946: 128 mins)

Heldt, Guido. Music and Levels of Narration in Film. Intellect, 2013. ["This is the first book-length study of the narratology of film music, and an indispensable resource for anyone researching or studying film music or film narratology. It surveys the so far piecemeal discussion of narratological concepts in film music studies, and tries to (cautiously) systematize them, and to expand and refine them with reference to ideas from general narratology and film narratology (including contributions from German-language literature less widely known in Anglophone scholarship). The book goes beyond the current focus of film music studies on the distinction between diegetic and nondiegetic music (music understood to be or not to be part of the storyworld of a film), and takes into account different levels of narration: from the extrafictional to ‘focalizations’ of subjectivity, and music’s many and complex movements between them."]

Notorious (USA: Alfred Hitchcock, 1946: 101 mins)

"Notorious: Hitchcock's Mature and Intricate Espionage Masterpiece." Cinephilia and Beyond (August 2016)

The Strange Love of Martha Ivers (USA: Lewis Milestone, 1946: 114 mins)

Bastién, Angelica Jade. "The Feminine Grotesque #5: Lilith’s Heir – On The Strange Love of Martha Ivers." Vague Visages (March 18, 2016)

Three Strangers (USA: Jean Negulesco, 1946: 92 mins)

Labuza, Peter and Farran Smith Nehme. "Three Strangers." The Cinephiliacs #6 (October 21, 2012)

1947

Black Narcissus (UK: Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1947: 100 mins)

Harvey, Dennis. "Sabu’s Enduring Star Power." Keyframe (January 5, 2014)

Daisy Kenyon (USA: Otto Preminger, 1947: 99 mins)

Longworth, Karina. "Six Degrees of Joan Crawford: The Middle Years (Mildred Pierce to Johnny Guitar)." You Must Remember This (August 29, 2016) ["Joan Crawford struggled through what she called her “middle years,” the period during her 40s before she remade herself from aging, slumping MGM deadweight into a fleet, journeywoman powerhouse who starred in some of the most interesting films about adult womanhood of the 1940s and 1950s. That revival began with Mildred Pierce (for which Crawford won her only Oscar), and included a number of films, such as Daisy Kenyon and Johnny Guitar, directed by men who would later be upheld as auteurs, subversively making personal art within the commercial industry of Hollywood."]

Out of the Past (USA: Jacques Tourneur, 1947: 97 mins)

Doherty, Thomas. "Out of the Past." The Cinephiliacs #79 (May 15, 2016)

1948

3 Godfathers (USA: John Ford, 1948: 106 mins)

Freedman, Carl. "Post-Hetrosexuality: John Wayne and the Construction of American Masculinity." Film International 5.1 (2007) [Professor has a copy]

Bicycle Thieves (Italy: Vittorio De Sica, 1948: 93 mins)

LoBrutto, Vincent. "Italian Neorealism: The Bicycle Thief." Becoming Film Literate: The Art and Craft of Motion Pictures. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2005: 33-38. [BCTC Library: PN1994 L595 2005]

Mooney, James. "Bicycle Thieves." Film and Philosophy (March 8, 2013)

Drunken Angel (Japan: Akira Kurosawa, 1948: 98 mins)

Hogg, Trevor. "Epic Dreamer: An Akira Kurosawa Profile." Flickering Myth (March 24, 2010)

A Foreign Affair (USA: Billy Wilder, 1948: 116 mins)

Riley, Christina. "Billy Wilder's A Foreign Affair: Marlene Dietrich's Star Persona and American Interventionist Strategies in Postwar Berlin." Bright Lights Film Journal #76 (May 2012)

Fort Apache (USA: John Ford, 1948: 125 mins)

Freedman, Carl. "Post-Hetrosexuality: John Wayne and the Construction of American Masculinity." Film International 5.1 (2007) [Professor has a copy]

Kehr, Dave. "How the West Was Filled With Loss." The New York Times (March 25, 2012)

Oliver Twist (UK: David Lean, 1948: 105 mins)

Ferguson, Susan. "Capitalist Childhood in Film: Modes of Critique." Jump Cut #55 (Fall 2013)

Portrait of Jennie (USA: William Dieterle, 1948: 86 mins)

Kuersten, Erich. "CinemArchetype #2: The Anima." Acidemic (January 29, 2012)

The Red Shoes (UK: Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, 1948: 134 mins)

Bird, Daniel, Maitland McDonagh and Mike White. "The Red Shoes (1948)." The Projection Booth #319 (April 20, 2017) ["The film centers on the tumultuous world of dance, namely ballet. We follow Julian Craster (Marius Goring) and Vicky Page (Moira Shearer) through triumphs and misfortunes. A favorite of Martin Scorsese, the film is a triumph of melodrama and includes several breathtaking dance sequences, most notably an adaptation of Hans Christian Andersen's The Red Shoes."]

Ruthless (USA: Edgar G. Ulmer, 1948: 104 mins)

Isenberg, Noah. "Ruthless." The Cinephiliacs #31 (January 19, 2014)

Van Gogh (France: Alain Resnais, 1948: 20 mins)

Cook, Adam. "Vincent Van Gogh In Cinema: A multilayered portrait emerges." Keyframe (May 22, 2016)


1949

The Heiress (USA: William Wyler, 1949: 115 mins)

Donegan, Moira. "Does That Humiliate You?: The Heiress" N + 1 (February 12, 2014)

I Shot Jesse James (USA: Samuel Fuller, 1949: 81 mins)

Anthony, West, David Blakeslee and Robert Nishimura. "The First Films of Samuel Fuller." The Eclipse Viewer #4 (October 24, 2012)

Jour de Fete." (France: Jacques Tati, 1949: 70 mins)

Ross, Kristin. "Jacques Tati, Historian." Current (October 30, 2014)

Kind Hearts and Coronets (UK: Robert Hamer, 1949: 106 mins)

Clarko, Clarko and Daniel Tiger. "Kind Hearts and Coronets." Cinema Gadfly (August 2015)

Le Silence de la Mer (France: Jean-Pierre Melville, 1949: 87 mins)



Lane, Anthony. "Jean-Pierre Melville's Cinema of Resistance." The New Yorker (May 1, 2017) ["His films are illuminated by what he saw when France was ruled by oppression and ordinary people had to decide what, or whom, they would obey."]

She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (USA: John Ford, 1949: 103 mins)

Freedman, Carl. "Post-Hetrosexuality: John Wayne and the Construction of American Masculinity." Film International 5.1 (2007) [Professor has a copy]

Stray Dog (Japan: Akira Kurosawa, 1949: 122 mins)

Hogg, Trevor. "Epic Dreamer: An Akira Kurosawa Profile." Flickering Myth (March 24, 2010)

Under Capricorn (UK: Alfred Hitchcock, 1949: 117 mins)

Anderson, Barry, et al. "The Unedited Commentary Track: Under Capricorn (Alfred Hitchcock; 1949)." Illusion Travels by Streetcar #101 (April 24, 2016)

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