Friday, December 23, 2011

ENG 282: 1960s

1960

The Bad Sleep Well (Japan: Akira Kurosawa, 1960: 151 mins)

Hogg, Trevor. "Epic Dreamer: An Akira Kurosawa Profile." Flickering Myth (March 24, 2010)

Blood and Roses (France/Italy: Roger Vadim, 1960: 74 mins)

Deighan, Samm and Kat Ellinger. "Lust for a Female Vampire Lover: The Evolution of Lesbian Vampires in Cinema, Part 1." Daughters of Darkness #1 (March 12, 2016)  ["This first episode of three begins by examining the lesbian vampire from her origins in eighteenth century Gothic literature, particularly Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s unfinished poem “Christabel” (1797) and Irish writer Sheridan Le Fanu’s story “Carmilla” (1871), both of which explore themes of monstrosity, repressed sexuality, and female identity. “Carmilla” — the source material for the majority of lesbian vampire films — follows a lonely young woman named Laura, who makes a strange, seductive new friend, Carmilla, whose designs on Laura are decidedly sanguinary. Carl Theodor Dreyer’s surreal horror film Vampyr (1932) was the first to adapt “Carmilla,” however loosely, but was followed soon after by the more straightforward Universal horror film, Dracula’s Daughter (1936). The latter — with its depiction of an elegant, sympathetic female vampire reluctantly driven to act out her bloodlust out on female as well as male victims — was among the first to portray vampirism as a blend of madness, female hysteria, sexual dysfunction, and addiction. Dracula’s Daughter would influence subsequent adaptations of “Carmilla,” like Roger Vadim’s lush arthouse effort Blood and Roses (1960) and obscure Italian Gothic horror film Crypt of the Vampire (1964). The film co-starred Hammer star Christopher Lee, who spends much of the running time in an outrageous smoking jacket. Speaking of Hammer studios, the episode wraps up with a discussion of their Karnstein trilogy, a watershed moment for lesbian vampire cinema. Films like The Vampire Lovers (1970), Lust for a Vampire (1971), and Twins of Evil (1971) — as well as some of the studio’s outlier efforts like The Brides of Dracula (1960) or Countess Dracula (1971) — left a bloody mark on vampire films. With minimal violence and plenty of nudity from buxom starlets like Ingrid Pitt, these films generally depict aristocratic vampires preying on innocent young ladies in pastoral settings. A film like The Vampire Lovers was famous for its use of lesbianism and casual nudity, but is quite restrained compared to the films discussed in episode two by European directors like Jess Franco and Jean Rollin."]

The Brides of Dracula (UK: Terence Fisher, 1960: 85 mins)

Deighan, Samm and Kat Ellinger. "Lust for a Female Vampire Lover: The Evolution of Lesbian Vampires in Cinema, Part 1." Daughters of Darkness #1 (March 12, 2016)  ["This first episode of three begins by examining the lesbian vampire from her origins in eighteenth century Gothic literature, particularly Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s unfinished poem “Christabel” (1797) and Irish writer Sheridan Le Fanu’s story “Carmilla” (1871), both of which explore themes of monstrosity, repressed sexuality, and female identity. “Carmilla” — the source material for the majority of lesbian vampire films — follows a lonely young woman named Laura, who makes a strange, seductive new friend, Carmilla, whose designs on Laura are decidedly sanguinary. Carl Theodor Dreyer’s surreal horror film Vampyr (1932) was the first to adapt “Carmilla,” however loosely, but was followed soon after by the more straightforward Universal horror film, Dracula’s Daughter (1936). The latter — with its depiction of an elegant, sympathetic female vampire reluctantly driven to act out her bloodlust out on female as well as male victims — was among the first to portray vampirism as a blend of madness, female hysteria, sexual dysfunction, and addiction. Dracula’s Daughter would influence subsequent adaptations of “Carmilla,” like Roger Vadim’s lush arthouse effort Blood and Roses (1960) and obscure Italian Gothic horror film Crypt of the Vampire (1964). The film co-starred Hammer star Christopher Lee, who spends much of the running time in an outrageous smoking jacket. Speaking of Hammer studios, the episode wraps up with a discussion of their Karnstein trilogy, a watershed moment for lesbian vampire cinema. Films like The Vampire Lovers (1970), Lust for a Vampire (1971), and Twins of Evil (1971) — as well as some of the studio’s outlier efforts like The Brides of Dracula (1960) or Countess Dracula (1971) — left a bloody mark on vampire films. With minimal violence and plenty of nudity from buxom starlets like Ingrid Pitt, these films generally depict aristocratic vampires preying on innocent young ladies in pastoral settings. A film like The Vampire Lovers was famous for its use of lesbianism and casual nudity, but is quite restrained compared to the films discussed in episode two by European directors like Jess Franco and Jean Rollin."]

Exodus (USA: Otto Preminger, 1960: 208 mins)

"Kirk Douglas, Dalton Trumbo and Otto Preminger (Breaking the Blacklist, Part 2)." You Must Remember This (June 20, 2016) ["How did the Blacklist come to an end? If you ask Kirk Douglas, the end began with his hiring of Dalton Trumbo to write Spartacus -- or, rather Douglas flaunting of that hiring. Otto Preminger, who hired Trumbo to write Exodus, might see it differently. In truth, the end of the blacklist was a process that took over a decade, and couldn’t have happened without actions taken by, amongst others, Charlie Chaplin, director Joseph Losey, members of the Academy's Board of Governors and president John F. Kennedy. We'll talk about the connection between the end of the blacklist and the weakening of the production code, and what both had to do with the slow dissolution of the studio system amidst the rise of independent producers and a younger generation of audiences. Finally, we’ll discuss how those who had been blacklisted struggled to move on."]

Eyes Without a Face (France/Italy: Georges Franju, 1960: 90 mins)


Ince, Kate, et al. "Eyes Without a Face." The Projection Booth #278 (July 5, 2016) ["Georges Franju's Eyes Without a Face (1960) is an atmospheric "anguish story" about a young woman who's lost her face and the overbearing father who works to give her a new one. Special Guest Kate Ince, author of the French Film Directors book Georges Franju, relates Franju's career and themes."] 

The Goddess (India: Satyajit Ray, 1960: 93 mins)

Burton, David F. "Fire, Water and The Goddess: The Films of Deepa Mehta and Satyajit Ray as Critiques of Hindu Patriarchy>" The Journal of Religion & Film 17.2 (October 2013)

Horror Hotel (aka City of the Dead) (UK: John Moxey, 1960: 78 mins)

Kuersten, Erich. "CinemArchetype #5: The Human Sacrifice." Acidemic (February 28, 2012)

Intimidation (Japan: Koreyoshi Kurahara, 1960: 65 mins)

Berrett, Trevor, David Blakeslee and Pablo Knote. "The Warped World of Koreyoshi Kurahara, Part 1." The Eclipse Viewer #44 (June 22, 2016) ["Over the course of his varied career, Koreyoshi Kurahara made meticulous noirs, jazzy juvenile-delinquency pictures, and even nature films. His free-form approach to moviemaking was perfectly suited to the radical spirit of the 1960s, when he was one of the biggest hit makers working at the razzle-dazzle, youth-oriented Nikkatsu studios."]

The Magnificent Seven (USA: John Sturges, 1960: 128 mins)

McGee, Patrick. From Shane to Kill Bill: Rethinking the Western. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2007.[Professor has copy]

Primary (USA: Robert Drew, 1960: 60 mins)

Enright, Keith and Aaron West. "The War Room and Politics in Film." Criterion Close-Up #39 (May 31, 2016)

Rocco and His Brothers (Italy/France: Luchino Visconti, 1960: 177 mins) 

McNeil, Jeremiah and Thomas Sutpen. "The Unedited Commentary Track: Rocco and His Brothers (Luchino Visconti; 1960)." Illusion Travels by Streetcar #127 (November 15, 2016(

"Rocco and His Brothers." Masters of Cinema Cast (October 19, 2016)

Spartacus (USA: Stanley Kubrick, 1960: 197 mins)

Beyl, Cameron. "The Directors Series: Stanley Kubrick, Pts. 1-5." The Film Stage (February 11, 2015)

"Kirk Douglas, Dalton Trumbo and Otto Preminger (Breaking the Blacklist, Part 2)." You Must Remember This (June 20, 2016) ["How did the Blacklist come to an end? If you ask Kirk Douglas, the end began with his hiring of Dalton Trumbo to write Spartacus -- or, rather Douglas flaunting of that hiring. Otto Preminger, who hired Trumbo to write Exodus, might see it differently. In truth, the end of the blacklist was a process that took over a decade, and couldn’t have happened without actions taken by, amongst others, Charlie Chaplin, director Joseph Losey, members of the Academy's Board of Governors and president John F. Kennedy. We'll talk about the connection between the end of the blacklist and the weakening of the production code, and what both had to do with the slow dissolution of the studio system amidst the rise of independent producers and a younger generation of audiences. Finally, we’ll discuss how those who had been blacklisted struggled to move on."]

Take Aim at the Police Van (Japan: Seijun Suzuki, 1960: 79 mins)


Berrett, Trevor, David Blakeslee and Pablo Knote. "Nikkatsu Noir, Part 1." The Eclipse Viewer #52 (February 1, 2017)["From the late 1950s through the sixties, wild, idiosyncratic crime movies were the brutal and boisterous business of Nikkatsu, the oldest film studio in Japan. In an effort to attract youthful audiences growing increasingly accustomed to American and French big-screen imports, Nikkatsu began producing action potboilers (mukokuseki akushun, or “borderless action”) that incorporated elements of the western, comedy, gangster, and teen-rebel genres. This bruised and bloody collection represents a standout cross section of what Nikkatsu had to offer, from such prominent, stylistically daring directors as Seijun Suzuki, Toshio Masuda, and Takashi Nomura."]

The Virgin Spring (Sweden: Ingmar Bergman, 1960: 89 mins)

Heller-Nicholas, Alexandra. Silence and Fury: Rape and The Virgin Spring." Screening the Past (September 1, 2010)

The Warped Ones (Japan: Koreyoshi Kurahara, 1960: 75 mins)

Berrett, Trevor, David Blakeslee and Pablo Knote. "The Warped World of Koreyoshi Kurahara, Part 1." The Eclipse Viewer #44 (June 22, 2016) ["Over the course of his varied career, Koreyoshi Kurahara made meticulous noirs, jazzy juvenile-delinquency pictures, and even nature films. His free-form approach to moviemaking was perfectly suited to the radical spirit of the 1960s, when he was one of the biggest hit makers working at the razzle-dazzle, youth-oriented Nikkatsu studios."]

Zazie dans le métro (France/Italy: Louis Malle, 1960: 89 mins)

Vincendeau, Ginette. "Zazie dans le métro: Girl Trouble." Current (June 28, 2011)





1961


Accattone (Italy: Pier Paolo Pasolini, 1961: 120 mins)

Collier, Stuart, et al. "The First Pasolini Episode (1961 - 1966)." Illusion Travels by Streetcar #126 (October 26, 2016)

Breakfast at Tiffany's (USA: Blake Edwards, 1961: 115 mins)

Heldt, Guido. Music and Levels of Narration in Film. Intellect, 2013. ["This is the first book-length study of the narratology of film music, and an indispensable resource for anyone researching or studying film music or film narratology. It surveys the so far piecemeal discussion of narratological concepts in film music studies, and tries to (cautiously) systematize them, and to expand and refine them with reference to ideas from general narratology and film narratology (including contributions from German-language literature less widely known in Anglophone scholarship). The book goes beyond the current focus of film music studies on the distinction between diegetic and nondiegetic music (music understood to be or not to be part of the storyworld of a film), and takes into account different levels of narration: from the extrafictional to ‘focalizations’ of subjectivity, and music’s many and complex movements between them."]

The Exiles (USA: Kent MacKenzie, 1961: 72 mins)

Daarstad, Eric. "Cinematiographer of The Exiles." Film School (January 26, 2010)

Ferdinand, Marilyn. "Kent Mackenzie's The Exiles (1961): This uncategorizable classic captures life in L.A.'s seamy underbelly." Bright Lights Film Journal #47 (February 2005)

The Hustler (USA: Robert Rossen, 1961: 134 mins)

Laurie, Piper. "Carrie and The Hustler." I Was There Too #39 (June 22, 2016)

The Innocents (USA: Jack Clayton, 1961: 100 mins)

Berrett, Trevor, David Blakeslee and Scott Nye. "Jack Clayton's The Innocents." Criterion Cast #187 (October 25, 2017) ["This genuinely frightening, exquisitely made supernatural gothic stars Deborah Kerr as an emotionally fragile governess who comes to suspect that there is something very, very wrong with her precocious new charges. A psychosexually intensified adaptation of Henry James’s classic The Turn of the Screw, cowritten by Truman Capote and directed by Jack Clayton, The Innocents is a triumph of narrative economy and technical expressiveness, from its chilling sound design to the stygian depths of its widescreen cinematography by Freddie Francis."]

Léon Morin, Priest (France/Italy: Jean-Pierre Melville, 1961: 117 mins)

Lane, Anthony. "Jean-Pierre Melville's Cinema of Resistance." The New Yorker (May 1, 2017) ["His films are illuminated by what he saw when France was ruled by oppression and ordinary people had to decide what, or whom, they would obey."]

The Misfits (USA: John Huston, 1961: 124 mins)

Carman, Emily. "The Misfits." The Cinephiliacs #81 (June 26, 2016) ["If you know a bit about Classical Hollywood, you probably know that as much as the stars of the 1930s showed glitz and glamour on screen, they were often slaves to the whims of the studios that owned them. Or did they? Emily Carman of Chapman University joins Peter to discuss her book, Independent Stardom: Freelance Women in the Hollywood Studio System, which explores the legal contracts behind stars like Carole Lombard and Irene Dunne, who were able to find control over the films and public image they made in an unprecedented matter decades before the independent takeover. Emily also discusses the importance of thinking about archives in film research, the tactile nature of film studies, and rethinking how to approach a feminist film history. Finally, Emily brings her knowledge of the city of Reno to a discussion of John Huston's The Misfits, a film with stars morbidly moving through a dying space that Peter declares it "the death of classical cinema."]

One-Eyed Jacks (USA: Marlon Brando, 1961: 141 mins)

Duvall, Jamey, et al. "One-Eyed Jacks (1961)." The Projection Booth #325 (June 1, 2017) ["Based on Charles Neider's book The Authentic Death of Hendry Jones, One-Eyed Jacks (1961) tells the tale of Rio AKA The Kid, played by Marlon Brando, and Dad Longsworth, played by Karl Malden. The two are outlaws who take very different paths, the Kid being a "noble" criminal while Dad eventually becomes a servant of the law. We watch them spar in the coastal Californian city of Monterrey where the tumultuous water serves as a metaphor for the raging emotions inside each man. The film was originally supposed to have been a powerhouse production with Sam Peckinpah writing the adaptation, Stanley Kubrick directing, and Brando as the star. But things don't always work out the way they're supposed to. Instead, this became the first and only film that Brando directed."]

Pigs and Battleships (Japan: Shohei Imamura, 1961: 108 mins)

Cribbs, John, Chris Funderberg and Martin Kessler. "Shohei Imamura." Flixwise (September 19, 2017) ["Martin Kessler is joined by Chris Funderberg and John Cribbs of thepinksmoke.com to discuss the films of two-time Palme d’Or award-wining director Shohei Imamura. They talk about his dark subject matter, his bleak point of view, the phases of his career, and his wild sense of humour. They discuss how Imamura has been handled by critics, compare him to New German Cinema, Luis Buñuel, and discuss why comparing him to other Japanese filmmakers may be misleading."]

Through a Glass Darkly (SwedenL Ingmar Bergman, 1961: 89 mins)

D'anna, Becky, Dave Eves and James Hancock. "Ingmar Bergman and the Trilogy." Wrong Reel #273 (May 2017)

Viridiana (Spain/Mexico: Luis Buñuel, 1961: 90 mins)

Hill, Lee. "Viridiana." Senses of Cinema #59 (2009)

Wood, Michael. "Viridiana: The Human Comedy." Current (May 22, 2006)

Yojimbo (Japan: Akira Kurosawa, 1961: 110 mins)

Hogg, Trevor. "Epic Dreamer: An Akira Kurosawa Profile." Flickering Myth (March 24, 2010)

"Yojimbo." Cinematologists (April 9, 2015)

Zero Focus (Japan: Yoshitarô Nomura, 1961: 95 mins)

Jacoby, Alexander. "Journeys into night: the police thrillers of Yoshitaro Nomura." Sight and Sound (March 27, 2014) ["Investigating post-war Japan with Shochiku’s career exponent of sleek, subtle genre cinema."]


1962

An Autumn Afternoon (Japan: Yasujirô Ozu, 1962: 112 mins)

Devens, Arik and Krista Mrgan. "An Autumn Afternoon." Cinema Gadfly #23 (July 18, 2016)

Cape Fear (USA: J. Lee Thompson, 1962: 105 mins)

El Goro and Johnnie Wolfstein. "The Night of the Hunter (1955) and Cape Fear (1962)." Talk Without Rhythm #354 (January 22, 2017)

Carnival of Souls (USA: Herk Harvey, 1962: 78 mins)

Hauck, Dennis. "Too Late." The Treatment (August 10, 2016) ["Director Dennis Hauck joins Elvis Mitchell to discuss the importance of Techniscope and the 1962 film Carnival of Souls in his directorial debut Too Late."]

Cleo from 5 to 7 (France/Italy: Agnès Varda, 1962: 90 mins)

Hamilton-Smith, David. "Life's Incidental Character: The Films Of Agnès Varda." The Quietus (June 6, 2014)

The Connection (USA: Shirley Clarke, 1962: 110 mins)

Doros, Dennis. "The Films of Shirley Clarke." On Film (March 28, 2015)

Dr. No (UK: Terence Young, 1962: 110 mins)

Lipp, Deborah. "Growing Up a Bond Girl." Audiovisualcy (November 1, 2012)

Harakiri (Japan: Masaki Kobayashi, 1962: 133 mins)

Hancock, James and Tony Stella. "The Cinema of Masaki Kobayashi." Wrong Reel #283 (June 22, 2017)

I Hate But Love (Japan: Koreyoshi Kurahara, 1962: 106 mins)

Berrett, Trevor, David Blakeslee and Pablo Knote. "The Warped World of Koreyoshi Kurahara, Part 1." The Eclipse Viewer #44 (June 22, 2016) ["Over the course of his varied career, Koreyoshi Kurahara made meticulous noirs, jazzy juvenile-delinquency pictures, and even nature films. His free-form approach to moviemaking was perfectly suited to the radical spirit of the 1960s, when he was one of the biggest hit makers working at the razzle-dazzle, youth-oriented Nikkatsu studios."]

Il Sorpasso (Italy: Dino Risi, 1962: 105 mins)

Ehrlich, David. "Il Sorpasso both exemplifies and perfects the Italian comedy." A.V. Club (April 30, 2014)

Ivan's Childhood (Soviet Union: Andrei Tarkovsky, 1962: 84 mins)

Bond, Lewis. "Andrei Tarkovsky - Poetic Harmony." (Posted on Youtube: April 29, 2016)

Jules and Jim (France: François Truffaut, 1962: 105 mins)

"Francois Truffaut, Original Auteur." The Current (February 6, 2014)

LoBrutto, Vincent. "French New Wave: Jules and Jim." Becoming Film Literate: The Art and Craft of Motion Pictures. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2005: 170-175. [BCTC Library: PN1994 L595 2005]

Powers, John. "On Jules and Jim." Current (February 4, 2014)

Knife in the Water (Poland: Roman Polanski, 1962: 94 mins)

López, Cristina Álvarez and Adrian Martin. "Roman Polanski: Cinema of Invasion." ACMI (October 13, 2016)

Lawrence of Arabia (UK/USA: David Lean, 1962: 216 mins)

LoBrutto, Vincent. "The Epic: Lawrence of Arabia." Becoming Film Literate: The Art and Craft of Motion Pictures. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2005: 176-182. [BCTC Library: PN1994 L595 2005]

L'Eclisse (Italy/France: Michelangelo Antonioni, 1962: 126 mins)


Antonioni's entire work projects visual metaphors of non-communication, alienation, solitude - and desperate attempts to break through to others. But man is overpowered by objects, structures, and the physical world; and people rarely face each other except in tension. (12) Vogel, Amos. Film as a Subversive Art NY: Random House, 1974.

Mamma Roma (Italy: Pier Paulo Pasolini, 1962: 110 mins)

Collier, Stuart, et al. "The First Pasolini Episode (1961 - 1966)." Illusion Travels by Streetcar #126 (October 26, 2016)

Sachs, Ben. "From Mamma Roma to Mamma Alien." The Chicago Reader (April 16, 2014)

The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (USA: John Ford, 1962: 123 mins)

Freedman, Carl. "Post-Hetrosexuality: John Wayne and the Construction of American Masculinity." Film International 5.1 (2007) [Professor has a copy]

McGee, Patrick. From Shane to Kill Bill: Rethinking the Western. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2007.[Professor has copy]

The Pitfall (Japan: Hiroshi Teshigahara, 1962: 97 mins)

Benton, Michael. "Pitfall/Otoshiana (Japan: Hiroshi Teshigahara, 1962)." Dialogic (January 1, 2009)

Salvatore Giuliano (Italy: Francesco Rosi, 1962: 125 mins)

Sragow, Michael. "The Shape of Corruption." Current (September 18, 2017)

Sanjuro (Japan: Aikra Kurosawa, 1962: 96 mins)

Hogg, Trevor. "Epic Dreamer: An Akira Kurosawa Profile." Flickering Myth (March 24, 2010)

Sragow, Michael. "Sanjuro." Current (January 22, 2007)

The Trial of Joan of Arc (France: Robert Bresson, 1962: 65 mins)

Tupitsyn, Masha. "On Robert Bresson." Necessary Fiction (January 8, 2014)


1963

The Birds (USA: Alfred Hitchcock, 1963: 119 mins)

"Director Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘Shadow of a Doubt’ – ‘Psycho’ – ‘The Birds’." Sound on Sight #309 (February 29, 2012)

The Cool World (USA: Shirley Clarke, 1963: 105 mins)

Doros, Dennis. "The Films of Shirley Clarke." On Film (March 28, 2015)


From Russia With Love (UK: Terence Young, 1963: 115 mins)

Lipp, Deborah. "Growing Up a Bond Girl." Audiovisualcy (November 1, 2012)

High and Low (Japan: Akira Kurosawa, 1963: 143 mins)

D'Angelo, Mike. "The highs and lows of High And Low." The Dissolve (February 20, 2014)

Hogg, Trevor. "Epic Dreamer: An Akira Kurosawa Profile." Flickering Myth (March 24, 2010)

The Insect Woman (Japan: Shohei Imamura, 1963: 123 mins)

Cribbs, John, Chris Funderberg and Martin Kessler. "Shohei Imamura." Flixwise (September 19, 2017) ["Martin Kessler is joined by Chris Funderberg and John Cribbs of thepinksmoke.com to discuss the films of two-time Palme d’Or award-wining director Shohei Imamura. They talk about his dark subject matter, his bleak point of view, the phases of his career, and his wild sense of humour. They discuss how Imamura has been handled by critics, compare him to New German Cinema, Luis Buñuel, and discuss why comparing him to other Japanese filmmakers may be misleading."]

La Jolie Mai (France: Chris Marker and Pierre Lhomme, 1963: 165 mins)

Lhomme, Pierre. "French Cinematographer on La Jolie Mai and Army of Shadows." The Close-Up #88 (July 2016)

Le Doulos (France/Italy: Jean-Pierre Melville, 1963: 108 mins)

Cribbs, John, et al. "Jean-Pierre Melville, Master of French Noir." Wrong Reel #318 (September 2017)

Lane, Anthony. "Jean-Pierre Melville's Cinema of Resistance." The New Yorker (May 1, 2017) ["His films are illuminated by what he saw when France was ruled by oppression and ordinary people had to decide what, or whom, they would obey."]

Le Petit Soldat (France: Jean-Luc Godard, 1963: 88 mins)

Brody, Richard. "An Exile in Paradise." The New Yorker (November 20, 2000)

Vicari, Justin. "Colonial fictions: Le Petit Soldat and its revisionist sequel, Beau Travail." Jump Cut #50 (2008)

Les Carabiniers (France/Italy: Jean-Luc Godard, 1963: 80 mins)

Brody, Richard. "An Exile in Paradise." The New Yorker (November 20, 2000)

Kaletzky, Marianne. "Enfeebling Fables: Weak Allegory in Les Carabiniers and The Silence." Bright Lights Film Journal #82 (November 2013)

L'Immortelle (France: Alain Robbe-Grillet, 1963: 101 mins)

Collier, Stuart, et al. "The First Films of Alain Robbe-Grillet, and more." Illusion Travels by Streetcar #19 (June 19, 2014)

McNeil, Jeremiah. "Alain Robbe-Grillet - L'Immortelle." My Cinematic Mind (July 16, 2014)

Lord of the Flies (UK: Peter Brooks, 1963: 92 mins)

"Three Reasons: Lord of the Flies Current (July 12, 2013)

The Organizer (Italy: Mario Monicello, 1963: 126 mins)

Hoberman, J. "The Organizer: Description of a Struggle." Current (April 24, 2012)

Monicello, Mario. "Workers Unite: On The Organizer." The Current (May 1, 2012)

Shock Corridor (USA: Samuel Fuller, 1963: 101 mins)

D'Angelo, Mike. "Shock Corridor." A.V. Club (September 14, 2009)

LoBrutto, Vincent. "The Art of the B Movie: Shock Corridor." Becoming Film Literate: The Art and Craft of Motion Pictures. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2005: 292-297. [BCTC Library: PN1994 L595 2005]

The Silence (Sweden: Ingmar Bergman, 1963: 96 mins)

D'anna, Becky, Dave Eves and James Hancock. "Ingmar Bergman and the Trilogy." Wrong Reel #273 (May 2017)

Kaletzky, Marianne. "Enfeebling Fables: Weak Allegory in Les Carabiniers and The Silence." Bright Lights Film Journal #82 (November 2013)

Winter Light (Sweden: Ingmar Bergman, 1963: 81 mins)

D'anna, Becky, Dave Eves and James Hancock. "Ingmar Bergman and the Trilogy." Wrong Reel #273 (May 2017)

King, Michelle R. "#17: Winter Light." Arts and Faith Top 100 Films (2011)



1964


A Hard Day's Night (UK: Richard Lester, 1964: 87 mins)

Lee, Kevin B. "Breaking Down the Beatles in A Hard Day Night: The Fab Four get quantified in the classic opening of their breakout film debut." Keyframe (February 28, 2015)

Assassination (Japan: Masahiro Shinoda, 1964: 104 mins)

Harper, Dan. "Assassination." Senses of Cinema #59 (2011)

Black Sun (Japan: Koreyoshi Kurahara, 1964: 94 mins)

Berret, Trevor, David Blakeslee and Pablo Knote. "The Warped World of Koreyoshi Kuragara, Pt. 2." The Eclipse Viewer #45 (July 14, 2016) ["Over the course of his varied career, Koreyoshi Kurahara made meticulous noirs, jazzy juvenile-delinquency pictures, and even nature films. His free-form approach to moviemaking was perfectly suited to the radical spirit of the 1960s, when he was one of the biggest hit makers working at the razzle-dazzle, youth-oriented Nikkatsu studios. The five films collected here hail from that era of the Japanese New Wave, and encompass breathless teen escapades, cruel crime stories, a Yukio Mishima adaptation, and even a Hollywood-inspired romantic comedy."]

Crypt of the Vampire (Italy/Spain: Camillo Mastrocinque, 1964: 82 mins)

Deighan, Samm and Kat Ellinger. "Lust for a Female Vampire Lover: The Evolution of Lesbian Vampires in Cinema, Part 1." Daughters of Darkness #1 (March 12, 2016)  ["This first episode of three begins by examining the lesbian vampire from her origins in eighteenth century Gothic literature, particularly Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s unfinished poem “Christabel” (1797) and Irish writer Sheridan Le Fanu’s story “Carmilla” (1871), both of which explore themes of monstrosity, repressed sexuality, and female identity. “Carmilla” — the source material for the majority of lesbian vampire films — follows a lonely young woman named Laura, who makes a strange, seductive new friend, Carmilla, whose designs on Laura are decidedly sanguinary. Carl Theodor Dreyer’s surreal horror film Vampyr (1932) was the first to adapt “Carmilla,” however loosely, but was followed soon after by the more straightforward Universal horror film, Dracula’s Daughter (1936). The latter — with its depiction of an elegant, sympathetic female vampire reluctantly driven to act out her bloodlust out on female as well as male victims — was among the first to portray vampirism as a blend of madness, female hysteria, sexual dysfunction, and addiction. Dracula’s Daughter would influence subsequent adaptations of “Carmilla,” like Roger Vadim’s lush arthouse effort Blood and Roses (1960) and obscure Italian Gothic horror film Crypt of the Vampire (1964). The film co-starred Hammer star Christopher Lee, who spends much of the running time in an outrageous smoking jacket. Speaking of Hammer studios, the episode wraps up with a discussion of their Karnstein trilogy, a watershed moment for lesbian vampire cinema. Films like The Vampire Lovers (1970), Lust for a Vampire (1971), and Twins of Evil (1971) — as well as some of the studio’s outlier efforts like The Brides of Dracula (1960) or Countess Dracula (1971) — left a bloody mark on vampire films. With minimal violence and plenty of nudity from buxom starlets like Ingrid Pitt, these films generally depict aristocratic vampires preying on innocent young ladies in pastoral settings. A film like The Vampire Lovers was famous for its use of lesbianism and casual nudity, but is quite restrained compared to the films discussed in episode two by European directors like Jess Franco and Jean Rollin."]

The Earth Dies Screaming (UK: Terence Fisher, 1964: 62 mins)

Dixon, Wheeler Winston. "'Turn It Off': Sound and Silence in 1960s British Gothic Cinema." Film International (October 31, 2014)

The Fall of the Roman Empire (USA: Anthony Mann, 1964: 188 mins)
Sabo, Lee Weston. "Auteurs in the Arena Anthony Mann's The Fall of the Roman Empire." Bright Lights Film Journal #76 (May 2012)

Goldfinger (UK: Guy Hamilton, 1964: 110 mins)

Lipp, Deborah. "Growing Up a Bond Girl." Audiovisualcy (November 1, 2012)

Hush Hush Sweet Charlotte (USA: Robert Aldritch, 1964: 133 mins)

Greven, David. "Bringing Out Baby Jane: Camp, Sympathy, and the 1960s Horror-Woman’s Film." Jump Cut #55 (Fall 2013)

Intentions of Murder (Japan: Shohei Imamura, 1964: 150 mins)

Cribbs, John, Chris Funderberg and Martin Kessler. "Shohei Imamura." Flixwise (September 19, 2017) ["Martin Kessler is joined by Chris Funderberg and John Cribbs of thepinksmoke.com to discuss the films of two-time Palme d’Or award-wining director Shohei Imamura. They talk about his dark subject matter, his bleak point of view, the phases of his career, and his wild sense of humour. They discuss how Imamura has been handled by critics, compare him to New German Cinema, Luis Buñuel, and discuss why comparing him to other Japanese filmmakers may be misleading."]

Kwaidan (Japan: Masaki Kobayashi, 1964: 125 mins)

Hancock, James and Tony Stella. "The Cinema of Masaki Kobayashi." Wrong Reel #283 (June 22, 2017)

Wada-Marciano, Mitsuyo. "J-horror: New Media’s Impact on Contemporary Japanese Horror Cinema." Horror to the Extreme: Changing Boundaries in Asian Cinema. ed. Jinhee Choi & Mitsuyo Wada-Marciano. Hong Kong University, 2009: 15-37.

The Night of the Iguana (USA: John Huston, 1964: 125 mins)

Kuersten Erich. "CinemArchetype #6: The Intimidating Nymph." Acidemic (March 2, 2012)

Onibaba (Japan: Kaneto Shindô, 1964: 103 mins)

Hancock, James and Tony Stella. "Talking Japanese Ghost Stories." Wrong Reel #335 (November 2017) ["Illustrator Tony Stella returns to discuss some of his favorite Japanese ghost stories on film: ‘Ugetsu’ (1953), ‘Onibaba’ (1964) & ‘Kuroneko’ (1968)."]

Wada-Marciano, Mitsuyo. "J-horror: New Media’s Impact on Contemporary Japanese Horror Cinema." Horror to the Extreme: Changing Boundaries in Asian Cinema. ed. Jinhee Choi & Mitsuyo Wada-Marciano. Hong Kong University, 2009: 15-37.

The Pawnbroker (USA: Sydney Lumet, 1964: 116 mins)

Celluloid Liberation Front. "Auschwitz­–Harlem: Post-Traumatic Economy in The Pawnbroker." Senses of Cinema #59 (2011)





The Soft Skin (France/Portugal: François Truffaut, 1964: 113 mins)

Cain, Maximilian Le. "Love in Flight: François Truffaut’s La Peau Douce." Senses of Cinema #33 (2004)

Klevan, Andrew. "Expressing the In-Between." LOLA #1 (2011)

Strait-Jacket (USA: William Castle, 1964: 93 mins)

Greven, David. "Bringing Out Baby Jane: Camp, Sympathy, and the 1960s Horror-Woman’s Film." Jump Cut #55 (Fall 2013)

The Tomb of Ligeia (UK: Roger Corman, 1964: 82 mins)

Kuersten, Erich. "CinemArchetype #2: The Anima." Acidemic (January 29, 2012)

The Train (France/Italy/USA: John Frankenheimer and Arthur Penn, 1964: 133 mins)

Barker, Jennifer Lynne. The Aesthetics of Antifascist Film: Radical Projection. Routledge, 2013. [Get through interlibrary loan]

The Umbrellas of Cherbourg (France/West Germany: Jacques Demy, 1964: 91 mins)

Koski, Genevieve, Keith Phipps and Scott Tobias. "The Umbrellas of Cherbourg / La La Land (Part 1)." The Next Picture Show #57 (December 27, 2016) ["Damian Chazelle’s new big-screen musical LA LA LAND takes its cues from various singing-and-dancing cinematic predecessors, but its melancholy tone is directly descended from Jacques Demy’s classic 1964 musical THE UMBRELLAS OF CHERBOURG — a Next Picture Show favorite that we dig into in this first half. We talk over the effects of the film’s sung-through style and working-class setting, and try to pinpoint that certain je ne said quoi that makes UMBRELLAS so indelible."]

---. "The Umbrellas of Cherbourg / La La Land (Part 2)." The Next Picture Show #58 (December 29, 2016) ["Our melancholy-musical double feature heads from Cherbourg, France, to Los Angeles USA, to see how Damien Chazelle’s new “modern-throwback” musical LA LA LAND stacks up against Jacques Demy’s UMBRELLAS OF CHERBOURG. We talk over LA LA LAND’s nostalgic appeal and speculate about its staying power, then compare how the two films utilize their settings, love stories, and singing to different but complementary ends."]

Woman in the Dunes (Japan: Hiroshi Teshigahara, 1964: 123 mins)

Hudson, David. "Sex in the Movies." Green Cine (2005)

"Woman in the Dunes' Golden Anniversary." Current (February 13, 2014)

Woman of Straw (UK: Basil Dearden, 1964: 122 mins)

Landekic, Lola. "Pablo Ferro: A Career Retrospective, Pt. 1." The Art of the Title (April 8, 2014)


1965


Alphaville (France: Jean-Luc Godard, 1965: 99 mins)

Yoshioka, Maximilian. "Technocratic Totalitarianism: One-Dimensional Thought in Jean-Luc Godard's Alphaville." Bright Lights Film Journal #78 (November 2012)

Faster Pussycat! Kill! Kill! (USA: Russ Meyer, 1965: 83 mins)

Kuersten Erich. "CinemArchetype #6: The Intimidating Nymph." Acidemic (March 2, 2012)

It Happened Here (UK: Kevin Brownlow and Andrew Mollo, 1965: 93 mins)

Kaufmann, Anthony. "It's Happening Here: Trump's America and Totalitarian Dystopias." Keyframe (November 17, 2016)

Le Bonheur (France: Agnes Varda, 1965: 79 mins)

Rogers, Nathaniel. "Women's Pictures - Agnes Varda's Le Bonheur." The Film Experience (June 19, 2015)

My Way Home (Hungary: Miklós Jancsó, 1965: 108 mins)

Risselada, Brian and Josh Ryan. "Miklós Jancsó." Syndromes and a Century #7 (February 13, 2014) ["... the films of acclaimed Hungarian director Miklós Jancsó who passed away on January 31, 2014 at the age of 92. In particular we look at his films My Way Home (1964), The Round-Up (1965) and The Red and the White (1967)."]

Pierrot Le Fou (France/Italy: Jean-Luc Godard, 1965: 110 mins)

Kuersten, Erich. "CinemArchetype #4: The Hanged Man." Acidemic  (February 12, 2012)

Planet of the Vampires (Italy/Spain: Mario Bava: 1965: 86 mins)

"Planet of the Vampires." The Projection Booth #175 (July 15, 2014)

Red Beard (Japan: Akira Kurosawa, 1965: 185 mins)

Hogg, Trevor. "Epic Dreamer: An Akira Kurosawa Profile." Flickering Myth (March 24, 2010)

Samurai Spy (Japan: Masahiro Shinoda, 1965: 102 mins)

Silver, Alain. "The Thin Line between Truth and Lies: Masahiro Shinoda’s Samurai Spy." Senses of Cinema #59 (2011)

The Skull (UK: Freddie Francis, 1965: 83 mins)

Dixon, Wheeler Winston. "'Turn It Off': Sound and Silence in 1960s British Gothic Cinema." Film International (October 31, 2014)

The Sound of Music (USA: Robert Wise, 1965: 174 mins)

Heldt, Guido. Music and Levels of Narration in Film. Intellect, 2013. ["This is the first book-length study of the narratology of film music, and an indispensable resource for anyone researching or studying film music or film narratology. It surveys the so far piecemeal discussion of narratological concepts in film music studies, and tries to (cautiously) systematize them, and to expand and refine them with reference to ideas from general narratology and film narratology (including contributions from German-language literature less widely known in Anglophone scholarship). The book goes beyond the current focus of film music studies on the distinction between diegetic and nondiegetic music (music understood to be or not to be part of the storyworld of a film), and takes into account different levels of narration: from the extrafictional to ‘focalizations’ of subjectivity, and music’s many and complex movements between them."]

The Spy Who Came in From the Cold (UK: Martin Ritt, 1965: 112 mins)

Desaulniers, Jake and Arik Devens. "The Spy Who Came in From the Cold." Cinema Gadfly #3 (ND) 

Thunderball (UK: Terence Young, 1965: 130 mins)

Lipp, Deborah. "Growing Up a Bond Girl." Audiovisualcy (November 1, 2012)

1966

A Bullet for the General (Italy: Damiano Damiani, 1966: 115 mins)

Cox, Alex. "The Wilder Bunch?" Keyframe (February 28, 2014) ["Alex Cox on screen violence and Sam Peckinpah, political legacies and the Spaghetti Western, plus Gian Maria Volonte and Klaus Kinski in Damiano Damiani’s A BULLET FOR THE GENERAL."]

Alice in Wonderland (UK: Jonathan Miller, 1966: 72 mins)

Smalley, G. "Alice in Wonderland (1966)." 366 Weird Movies (April 2, 2013)

Au Hasard Balthazar (France/Sweden: Robert Bresson, 1966: 95 mins)

Overstreet, Jeffrey. "#5: Au Hasard Balthazar." Arts and Faith Top 100 Films (2011)

Tupitsyn, Masha. "On Robert Bresson." Necessary Fiction (January 8, 2014)


Closely Watched Trains (Czechoslovakia: Jeri Menzel, 1966: 93 mins)

Dunn, Edward. "Closely Watching Closely Watched Trains: Devilishly layered details make the journey even more interesting than the destination." Keyframe (June 23, 2016)

Cul-de-sac (United Kingdom: Roman Polanski, 1966: 113 mins)

Hudson, David. "Polanski Season." Notebook (August 16, 2011)

López, Cristina Álvarez and Adrian Martin. "Roman Polanski: Cinema of Invasion." ACMI (October 13, 2016)

Django (Italy/Spain: Sergio Corbucci, 1966: 92 mins)

Hancock, James and Tony Stella. "The Best Spaghetti Westerns (Not Directed by Leone)." Wrong Reel #264 (May 2017)

Dracula: Prince of Darkness (UK: Terence Fisher, 1966: 90 mins)

Dixon, Wheeler Winston. "'Turn It Off': Sound and Silence in 1960s British Gothic Cinema." Film International (October 31, 2014)

The Endless Summer (USA: Bruce Brown, 1966: 95 mins)

Engle, John. "August and Everything After: A Half-Century of Surfing in Cinema." Bright Lights Film Journal #80 (May 2013)


Happy End (Czechoslovakia: Oldrich Lipský, 1966: 71 mins)

Buckingham, Ben, Kat Ellinger and Mike White. "Happy End (1966)." The Projection Booth #342 (September 26, 2017) ["We wrap up the first Czechtember series with a film from director Oldřich Lipský, 1966's Happy End, an experimental comedy (which is as unusual as that sounds) that puts shots in opposite order and runs motion backward from the death of our main character (Vladimír Menšík) while he gives the voice-over account of life from birth. Of course, this provides us with constant ironic juxtapositions. The film was co-written by Lipský and Milos Macourek, the screenwriter behind some of the best comedies out of Czechoslovakia in the '60s and '70s."]

The Hawks and the Sparrows (Italy: Pier Paolo Pasolini, 1966: 91 mins)

Collier, Stuart, et al. "The First Pasolini Episode (1961 - 1966)." Illusion Travels by Streetcar #126 (October 26, 2016)

Le Deuxieme Souffle (France: Jean-Pierre Melville, 1966: 150 mins)

Cribbs, John, et al. "Jean-Pierre Melville, Master of French Noir." Wrong Reel #318 (September 2017)

Masculin Féminin (France/Sweden: Jean-Luc Godard, 1966: 103 mins)

Brody, Richard. "An Exile in Paradise." The New Yorker (November 20, 2000)

Collier, Stuart, et al. "The Unedited Commentary Track: Masculin féminin (Jean-Luc Godard; 1966)." Illusion Travels by Streetcar #103 (May 15, 2016)

Modesty Blaise (UK: Joseph Losey, 1966: 119 mins)

Grant, Catherine. "Notes on Mirror Visions in Modesty Blaise. La Furia Umana #17 (2013)

One Million Years B.C. (UK: Don Chaffey, 1966: 91 mins)

Kuersten, Erich. "The Primal Father (CinemArchetypes #8)." Acidemic (March 19, 2012)

Persona (Sweden: Ingmar Bergman, 1966: 85 mins)

Elsaesser, Thomas. "The Persistence of Persona." Current (March 27, 2014)

Lustgarten, Abby. "10 Things I Learned: Persona." The Current (March 31, 2014)

The Pornographers (Japan: Shohei Imamura, 1966: 120 mins)

Cribbs, John, Chris Funderberg and Martin Kessler. "Shohei Imamura." Flixwise (September 19, 2017) ["Martin Kessler is joined by Chris Funderberg and John Cribbs of thepinksmoke.com to discuss the films of two-time Palme d’Or award-wining director Shohei Imamura. They talk about his dark subject matter, his bleak point of view, the phases of his career, and his wild sense of humour. They discuss how Imamura has been handled by critics, compare him to New German Cinema, Luis Buñuel, and discuss why comparing him to other Japanese filmmakers may be misleading."]

The Professionals (USA: Richard Brooks, 1966: 117 mins)

Daseler, Graham. "Depth Takes a Holiday: Good Bad Movies." Bright Lights Film Journal #80 (May 2013)

A Report on the Party and the Guests (Czechoslovakia: Jan Nemec, 1966: 71 mins)

Erickson, Steve. "The Art of Resistance: The brief, bright flowering of the Czech New Wave." Moving Image Source (April 24, 2012)

Ride in the Whirlwind (USA: Monte Hellman, 1966: 82 mins)

Atkinson, Michael. "The Shooting and Ride in the Whirlwind: We Can Bring a Good Bit of Rope." The Current (November 10, 2014)

The Round-Up (Hungary: Miklós Jancsó, 1966: 90 mins)

Risselada, Brian and Josh Ryan. "Miklós Jancsó." Syndromes and a Century #7 (February 13, 2014) ["... the films of acclaimed Hungarian director Miklós Jancsó who passed away on January 31, 2014 at the age of 92. In particular we look at his films My Way Home (1964), The Round-Up (1965) and The Red and the White (1967)."]

Seconds (USA: John Frankenheimer, 1966: 106 mins)

Blakeslee, David, Sean Hutchinson and Scott Nye. "John Frankenheimer's Seconds." Criterion Cast #148 (September 10, 2014)




The Shooting (USA: Monte Hellman, 1966: 82 mins)

Atkinson, Michael. "The Shooting and Ride in the Whirlwind: We Can Bring a Good Bit of Rope." The Current (November 10, 2014)

Thirst for Love (Japan: Koreyoshi Kurahara, 1966: 98 mins)

Berret, Trevor, David Blakeslee and Pablo Knote. "The Warped World of Koreyoshi Kuragara, Pt. 2." The Eclipse Viewer #45 (July 14, 2016) ["Over the course of his varied career, Koreyoshi Kurahara made meticulous noirs, jazzy juvenile-delinquency pictures, and even nature films. His free-form approach to moviemaking was perfectly suited to the radical spirit of the 1960s, when he was one of the biggest hit makers working at the razzle-dazzle, youth-oriented Nikkatsu studios. The five films collected here hail from that era of the Japanese New Wave, and encompass breathless teen escapades, cruel crime stories, a Yukio Mishima adaptation, and even a Hollywood-inspired romantic comedy."]

Tokyo Drifter (Japan: Seijun Suzuki, 1966: 82 mins)

Gallagher, Ryan, James McCormick and Justin Vactor. "Seijun Suzuki's Tokyo Drifter and Branded to Kill." Criterion Cast #125 (June 24, 2012)

Knudsen, Tyler. "Seijun Suzuki, A Director Who Influenced Quentin Tarantino, Jim Jarmusch, John Woo, and Others." Press Play (July 24, 2015)

Traces of Stones (East Germany: Frank Beyer, 1966: 139 mins)

Brockmann, Stephen. "Spur der Steine (1966) or Traces of Repression." A Critical History of German Film Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2010: 246-257. [Professor has copy of the book]

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (USA: Mike Nichols, 1966: 131 mins)

Nichols, Mike. "On His Filmmaking Style and Directing Actors." Pinewood Dialogues (March 1, 1990)

Wings (Soviet Union: Larisa Shepitko, 1966: 85 mins)

Blakeslee, David and Robert Nishimura. "Larisa Shepitko." The Eclipse Viewer #3 (September 24, 2012)

Young Torless (West Germany:France: Volker Schlöndorff, 1966: 90 mins)

Brockmann, Stephen. "Der junge Törless (1966) or Recapturing Tradition." A Critical History of German Film Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2010: 314-327. [Professor has copy of the book]

1967

Belle de Jour (France/Italy: Luis Buñuel, 1967: 101 mins)

Ebert, Roger. "Belle de Jour." Chicago Sun-Times (July 25, 1999)

Deadly Sweet (aka I Am What I Am) (Italy/France: Tinto Brass, 1967: 107 mins)

Axmaker, Sean. "The New Wave Wonders of Tinto Brass." Keyframe (February 20, 2014) ["Tinto Brass’s exuberant experiments stir the French New Wave and the sexual revolution into a swirl of sixties free-form madness."]

The Dirty Dozen (USA: Robert Aldrich, 1967: 150 mins)

Koski, Genevieve, et al. "Suicide Squad / The Dirty Dozen, Pt. 1." The Next Picture Show #39 (August 9, 2016) ["David Ayer has characterized his new entry in the DC Expanded Universe, SUICIDE SQUAD, as a modern take on Robert Aldrich's THE DIRTY DOZEN, a 1967 war/heist film that set the standard for movies about a band of criminals teaming up to take on a greater evil. In this half of the conversation, we put THE DIRTY DOZEN's violence and attitude toward war in historical context, and tangle with the film's difficult morality."]

---. "Suicide Squad / The Dirty Dozen, Pt. 2." The Next Picture Show #40 (August 11, 2016) ["Our comparison of bad-guys-doing-good films continues with THE DIRTY DOZEN’s ultra-modern, ultra-messy progeny, the new DC Extended Universe entry SUICIDE SQUAD. We try to make sense of the many issues plaguing the newer film, and decipher how the two films each come down on the ideas of villainy and leadership."]

The Fearless Vampire Killers (USA/UK: Roman Polanski, 1967: 91 mins)

Bradley, S.A. and James Hancock. "Enfant Terrible: Roman Polanski's Monsters." Hellbent for Horror #38 (April 19, 2917)

I Am Curious (Yellow) (Sweden: Vilgot Sjöman, 1967: 121 mins)

Blakeslee, David, James McCormick and Scott Nye. "Vilgot Sjöman's I Am Curious ..." Criterion Cast (March 30, 2016)

Hudson, David. "Sex in the Movies." Green Cine (2005)

La Chinoise (France: Jean-Luc Godard, 1967: 96 mins)

Brody, Richard. "An Exile in Paradise." The New Yorker (November 20, 2000)

Love Affair, Or the Case of the Missing Switchboard Operator (Yugoslavia: Dušan Makavejev, 1967: 70 mins)

Ross, Eloise. "Love Affair or The Case of the Missing Switchboard Operator (Dušan Makavejev, 1967)." Senses of Cinema #82 (March 2017)

Marketa Lazarová (Czechoslovakia: Frantisek Vlácil, 1967: 162 mins)

Hames, Peter. "In the Shadow of the Werewolf: František Vláčil's Markéta Lazarová." Central European Review (October 16, 2000)

Hoberman, J. "Prague's Savage Spring." The New York Review of Books (July 3, 2013)

The Producers (USA: Mel Brooks, 1967: 88 mins)

Hancock, James and Bill Scurry. "A Salute to the Great Mel Brooks." Wrong Reel #243 (March 2017)

The Red and the Black (Hungary/Soviet Union: Miklós Jancsó, 1967: 90 mins)

Risselada, Brian and Josh Ryan. "Miklós Jancsó." Syndromes and a Century #7 (February 13, 2014) ["... the films of acclaimed Hungarian director Miklós Jancsó who passed away on January 31, 2014 at the age of 92. In particular we look at his films My Way Home (1964), The Round-Up (1965) and The Red and the White (1967)."]

Samurai Rebellion (Japan: Masaki Kobayashi, 1967: 128 mins)

Hancock, James and Tony Stella. "The Cinema of Masaki Kobayashi." Wrong Reel #283 (June 22, 2017)

Titicut Follies (USA: Frederick Wiseman, 1967: 84 mins)

Wiseman, Frederick. "Frederick Wiseman." Indiewire Filmmaker Toolkit (April 19, 2017) ["One of the greatest filmmakers ever reflects on his career and his well refined process of making a masterpiece virtually every year. He explains why 50 years ago, as a lawyer in his 30s, he decided to make a film about a prison for the criminally insane ("Titicut Follies") and how he grew as an artist."]

Torture Garden (UK: Freddie Francis, 1967: 93 mins)

Dixon, Wheeler Winston. "'Turn It Off': Sound and Silence in 1960s British Gothic Cinema." Film International (October 31, 2014)

Trans-Europ Express (France/Belgium: Alain Robbe-Grillet, 1967: 105 mins)

Ehrenstein, David. "TRANS-EUROP-EXPRESS or Alain Robbe-Grillet Goes Boating: On the many ways one can enjoy the ride." Keyframe (May 2, 2014)

Weekend (France/Italy: Jean-Luc Godard, 1967: 105 mins)

Brody, Richard. "An Exile in Paradise." The New Yorker (November 20, 2000)

LoBrutto, Vincent. "The Essay Film: Weekend." Becoming Film Literate: The Art and Craft of Motion Pictures. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2005: 319-325. [BCTC Library: PN1994 L595 2005]

West, Aaron. "Weekend, 1967, Jean-Luc Godard." Short Cuts (October 23, 2015)


1968


Barbarella (France/Italy: Roger Vadim, 1968: 98 mins)

El Goro and Jae. "Barbarella (1968) and Flash Gordon (1980)." Talk without Rhythm #368 (April 30, 2017)

Bullitt (USA: Peter Yates, 1968: 114 mins)

Betancourt, Michael. "Pablo Ferro’s Title Montage for Bullitt (1968): The Criminality Beneath the Surface of Civil Society." Bright Lights Film Journal (April 29, 2014)

Landekic, Lola. "Pablo Ferro: A Career Retrospective, Part 2." Art of the Title (April 15, 2014)

The Color of Pomengranates (Soviet Union: Sergei Parajanov, 1968: 79 mins)

Nucho, Joanne. "Deep Red: The Color of Pomegranates." Reverse Shot (Spring 2004)

Coogan's Bluff (USA: Don Siegel, 1968: 93 mins)

Hancock, James and Matthias van der Roest. "Don and Clint." Wrong Reel #321 (September 2017)

Faces (USA: John Cassavetes, 1968: 130 mins)

Palmer, Landon. "6 Filmmaking Tips From John Cassavettes." Film School Rejects (August 13, 2014)





The Great Silence (Italy/France: Sergio Corbucci, 1968: 105 mins)

Hancock, James and Tony Stella. "The Best Spaghetti Westerns (Not Directed by Leone)." Wrong Reel #264 (May 2017)

Greetings (USA: Brian De Palma, 1968: 88 mins)

McNeil, Jeremiah, et al. "The Radical Comedies of Brian De Palma (1968-1980)." Illusion Travels By Streetcar #98 (April 7, 2016)

The Howl (Italy: Tinto Brass, 1968: 93 mins)

Axmaker, Sean. "The New Wave Wonders of Tinto Brass." Keyframe (February 20, 2014) ["Tinto Brass’s exuberant experiments stir the French New Wave and the sexual revolution into a swirl of sixties free-form madness."]

If ...  (UK: Lindsay Anderson, 1968: 111 mins)

Hurne, Mark and Aaron West. "If ... & Angry Young Men." Criterion Close-Up (September 7, 2015)

The Immortal Story (France: Orson Welles, 1968: 62 mins)

Kurant, Willy. "The Immortal Story." American Cinematographer (2010)

Je T'aime Je T'aime (France: Alain Resnais, 1968: 91 mins)

Hudson, David. "Alain Resnais’s JE T’AIME, JE T’AIME: ['Both goofy and poetic—as well as a significant film from his strongest period.'” Keyframe (February 17, 2014)

Kuroneko (Japan: Kaneto Shindô, 1968: 99 mins)

Hancock, James and Tony Stella. "Talking Japanese Ghost Stories." Wrong Reel #335 (November 2017) ["Illustrator Tony Stella returns to discuss some of his favorite Japanese ghost stories on film: ‘Ugetsu’ (1953), ‘Onibaba’ (1964) & ‘Kuroneko’ (1968)."]

Lucia (Cuba: Humberto Solás, 1968: 160 mins)

Bouza, Beatriz Ramos. "A Revolution Within a Revolution." Dialogic Cinephilia (March 1, 2017)

Memories of Underdevelopment (Cuba: Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, 1968: 97 mins)

Peña, Richard. "Memories of Underdevelopment." The Cinephiliacs #32 (February 3, 2014)

The Mercenary (Italy/Spain/USA: Sergio Corbucci, 1968: 110 mins)

Hancock, James and Tony Stella. "The Best Spaghetti Westerns (Not Directed by Leone)." Wrong Reel #264 (May 2017)

Oliver! (UK: Carol Reed, 1968: 153 mins)

Ferguson, Susan. "Capitalist Childhood in Film: Modes of Critique." Jump Cut #55 (Fall 2013)

Petulia (USA/UK: Richard Lester, 1968: 105 mins)

Collier, Stuart, Jeremiah McNeil and Tom Sutpen. "The Unedited Commentary Track: Petulia (Richard Lester; 1968)." Illusion Travels by Streetcar (June 9, 2016)

Planet of the Apes (USA: Franklin J. Schaffer, 1968: 112 mins)

Cribbs, John, et al. "The History of the Planet of the Apes." Wrong Reel #284 (June 22, 2017)

Pretty Poison (USA: Noel Black, 1968: 89 mins)

Harvey, David. "Barbed Wire Love." San Francisco Bay Guardian (March 27, 2012)

Profound Desire of the Gods(Japan: Shohei Imamura, 1968: 173 mins)

Cribbs, John, Chris Funderberg and Martin Kessler. "Shohei Imamura." Flixwise (September 19, 2017) ["Martin Kessler is joined by Chris Funderberg and John Cribbs of thepinksmoke.com to discuss the films of two-time Palme d’Or award-wining director Shohei Imamura. They talk about his dark subject matter, his bleak point of view, the phases of his career, and his wild sense of humour. They discuss how Imamura has been handled by critics, compare him to New German Cinema, Luis Buñuel, and discuss why comparing him to other Japanese filmmakers may be misleading."]

The Rape of the Vampire (France: Jean Rollin, 1968: 95 mins)

Deighan, Samm and Kat Ellinger. "Lust for a Female Vampire: The Evolution of Lesbian Vampires in Cinema, Part 2." Daughters of Darkness #2 (March 28, 2017) ["Kat and Samm continue their three-part discussion of lesbian vampire films, this time with a focus on European cult directors like Jess Franco, Jean Rollin, and Walerian Borowczyk. They begin their discussion with the career of the prolific Jess Franco, who produced a number of films with lesbian vampire themes, namely Vampyros Lesbos (1971). This starred his first muse, Soledad Miranda, as the mysterious Countess Carody, who sunbathes by day but thirsts for blood at night. Franco also adapted Bram Stoker’s novel with the relatively traditional Count Dracula (1970), but continued to explore his own perverse variations on vampire mythology in Dracula’s Daughter (1972) and the explicit Female Vampire (1975), with his longtime partner Lina Romay. Also explored is the work of French director Jean Rollin, known for his dreamlike, often surreal vampire films such as The Rape of the Vampire (1968), The Nude Vampire (1970), The Shiver of the Vampires (1971), and Requiem for a Vampire (1973). While these films infrequently use overt depictions of lesbianism, they are generally concerned with pairs or groups of female vampires banded together against the world. In films like Fascination (1979), about blood-drinking socialites, and The Living Dead Girl (1982), the tragic tale of a love that survives beyond death, Rollin expanded on his early themes. The episode concludes with a discussion of a few films that touch upon the legend of historical murderer and alleged blood-drinker Elizabeth Bathory. Most importantly is Belgian film Daughters of Darkness (1971), the podcast’s namesake, which follows a newly married couple who encounter an elegant and possibly ageless woman at a seaside hotel."]

Salesman (USA: Albert Maysles, David Maysles, and Charlotte Zwerin, 1968: 85 mins)

LoBrutto, Vincent. "Direct Cinema: Salesman." Becoming Film Literate: The Art and Craft of Motion Pictures. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2005: 267-272. [BCTC Library: PN1994 L595 2005]

Shame (Sweden: Ingmar Bergman, 1968: 103 mins)

Dawson, Mike. "Ingmar Bergman: Shame." Left Field Cinema (February 26, 2009)

The Swimmer (USA: Frank Perry, 1968: 95 mins)

Bozung, Justin, et al. "The Swimmer (1968)." The Projection Booth #338 (August 29, 2017) ["The 1968 film by Frank and Eleanor Perry, The Swimmer (based on the John Cheever short story of the same name), stars Burt Lancaster as Ned Merrill, a Connecticut executive who decides to head back home by swimming through the pools of his neighbors, a "river" which he names "Lucinda" after his wife. Along the way, Ned is met with drinks, laughs, reminders of his affairs that went sour, and maybe even reminders that what he pretends to be may be no more. Elric Kane and co-host emeritus Rob St. Mary join Mike to discuss the troubled production and ground-breaking ideas of The Swimmer."]

Theorem (Teorema) (Italy: Pier Paolo Pasolini, 1968: 105 mins)

Iannone, Pasquale. "Five Ways to Know a Pasolini Film." BFI (November 3, 2015)

McCahill, Mike. "Theorem: Pasolini gets political." Movie Mail (April 11, 2013)

The Thomas Crown Affair (USA: Norman Jewison, 1968: 102 mins)

Landekic, Lola. "Pablo Ferro: A Career Retrospective, Pt. 1." The Art of the Title (April 8, 2014)

The Valley of the Bees (Czechoslovakia:  Frantisek Vlácil, 1968: 97 mins)

McCalmont, Jonathan. "The Valley of the Bees (1968) - The Cross or the Cock." Ruthless Culture (April 21, 2011)



1969


Alice's Restaurant (USA: Arthur Penn, 1969: 111 mins)

"Alice's Restaurant." See Hear Podcast (May 23, 2016)

All My Compatriots (All My Good Countrymen) (Czechoslovakia:  Vojtech Jasný, 1969: 120 mins)

Berrett, Trevor, David Blakeslee and Jordan Essoe. "Summer 1969, Part 1." Criterion Now (October 29, 2017) ["Criterion Reflections is David Blakeslee’s ongoing project to watch all of the films included in the Criterion Collection in chronological order of their original release. Each episode features panel conversations and 1:1 interviews offering insights on movies that premiered in a particular season of a year in the past, which were destined to eventually bear the Criterion imprint. In this episode, David is joined by Jordan Essoe and Trevor Berrett to discuss five titles from the Summer of 1969: Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Love is Colder than Death, Vojtech Jasný’s All My Good Countrymen, Robert Downey Sr.’s Putney Swope, Louis Malle’s Phantom India and Nagisa Oshima’s Boy."]

Attraction (Italy: Tinto Brass, 1969: 77 mins)

Axmaker, Sean. "The New Wave Wonders of Tinto Brass." Keyframe (February 20, 2014) ["Tinto Brass’s exuberant experiments stir the French New Wave and the sexual revolution into a swirl of sixties free-form madness."]

Boy (Japan: Nagisa Ôshima, 1969: 97 mins)

Berrett, Trevor, David Blakeslee and Jordan Essoe. "Summer 1969, Part 1." Criterion Now (October 29, 2017) ["Criterion Reflections is David Blakeslee’s ongoing project to watch all of the films included in the Criterion Collection in chronological order of their original release. Each episode features panel conversations and 1:1 interviews offering insights on movies that premiered in a particular season of a year in the past, which were destined to eventually bear the Criterion imprint. In this episode, David is joined by Jordan Essoe and Trevor Berrett to discuss five titles from the Summer of 1969: Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Love is Colder than Death, Vojtech Jasný’s All My Good Countrymen, Robert Downey Sr.’s Putney Swope, Louis Malle’s Phantom India and Nagisa Oshima’s Boy."]

Burn! (Italy/France: Gillo Pontecorvo, 1969: 112 mins)

Kimmel, Michael. "Sitting in the Dark with Max: Classical Sociological Theory Through Film." Cinematic Sociology: Social Life in Film. Los Angeles, CA: Sage, 2013: 27-41. [In BCTC Library PN1995.9 S6 C543 2013]

Camille 2000 (Italy: Radley Metzger, 1969: 115 mins)

Drain, Heather and Kat Ellinger. "Scores of Lickerish – Radley Metzger and the Art of Pornography, Pt. 1." Hell's Belles #1 (September 3, 2017) ["Radley Metzger was unrivaled when it came to mixing erotica and porn with artistic flourish. Working in Europe during his early days he borrowed from Italian and Swedish cinema to create some of the most beautiful erotic film ever made. In this episode Heather and Kat take a look at Metzger’s early films with a focus on Camille 2000 (1969) and The Lickerish Quartet (1970) as well as unraveling some of the director’s key themes throughout his work in order to offer up a wide ranging appreciation of one of America’s most daring and artful independent filmmakers of all time."]

---. "Scores of Lickerish – Radley Metzger and the Art of Pornography, Pt. 2." Hell's Belles #2 (October 22, 2017) ["In this episode Heather and Kat take a look at Metzger’s later films with a focus on The Image(1975), The Opening of Misty Beethoven (1976) and Barbara Broadcast (1977) as well as unraveling some of the director’s key themes throughout his work in order to offer up a wide ranging appreciation of one of America’s most daring and artful independent filmmakers of all time."]

Cremator (Czechoslovakia: Juraj Herz, 1969: 95 mins)

Deighan, Sam and Mike White. "The Cremator (1968)." The Projection Booth #341 (September 19, 2017) ["Czechtember continues with a look at Juraj Herz's The Cremator (AKA Spalovac mrtvol). Released in 1968, the year of the Prague Spring, the film stars Rudolf Hrusínský as Karl (or Roman) Kopfrkingl, a man dedicated to the idea of liberating the soul from the body through the practice of cremation. Samm Deighan joins Mike to discuss collaborators and the madness that gripped the world in the 1930s and '40s."]

The Damned (Italy/West Germany: Luchino Visconti, 1969: 156 mins)

Barker, Jennifer Lynne. The Aesthetics of Antifascist Film: Radical Projection. Routledge, 2013. [Get through interlibrary loan]

Double Suicide (Japan: Masahiro Shinoda, 1969: 142 mins)

Rutherford, Anne. "Double Suicide and the 'fetishism of space.'" Senses of Cinema #59 (2011)

Downhill Racer (USA: Michael Ritchie, 1969: 101 mins)

Hurne, Mark and Aaron West. "Downhill Racer and the Olympics." Criterion Close-Up #47 (August 25, 2016) ["Mark and Aaron celebrate the Summer Olympics by exploring Downhill Racer, an independent film about the Winter Olympics. We draw parallels to what is portrayed in the Michael Ritchie with the actual sporting events that take place today, including the thrills of victory and the agony of defeat. We discuss the groundbreaking cinematography, the nature of winning in an individual sport and the the enduring legacy of Sundance that began with this film."]

Easy Rider (USA: Dennis Hopper, 1969: 95 mins)

Kuersten, Erich. "CinemArchetype #4: The Hanged Man." Acidemic  (February 12, 2012)

Martin, Adrian. "The Misleading Man: Dennis Hopper." Film International 5.1 (2007). [Professor has copy for students]

Eggshells (USA: Tobe Hooper, 1969: 89 mins)

Bradley, S.A. "Mr. Bad Example: The Legend of Tobe Hooper." Hell Bent for Horror #52 (September 5, 2017)

Funeral Parade of Roses (Japan: Toshio Matsumoto, 1969: 107 mins)

Hudson, David. "Toshio Matsumoto, 1932 - 2017." Keyframe (April 13, 2017) ["Film director, video artist and film theoretician, Toshio Matsumoto was a pioneer of Japanese 1960s experimental cinema," wrote Elsa Coustou in 2015 for the Tate Modern.]

Risselada, Brian, Josh Ryan and Max Slobodin. "Queer Cinema." Syndromes and a Cinema #5 (May 17, 2013)

Hitokiri (Japan: Hideo Gosha, 1969: 140 mins)

"Hideo Gosha - Hitokiri." Japan on Fire #26 (May 27, 2016)

The Honeymoon Killers (USA: Leonard Kastle, 1969: 108 mins)

McNeil, Jeremy, Dan Patterson and Tom Sutpen. "The Unedited Commentary Track: The Honeymoon Killers (Leonard Kastle; 1969)." Illusion Travels by Streetcar #92 (February 16, 2016)

Horrors of Malformed Men (Japan: Teruo Ishii, 1969: 99 mins)

Curti, Roberto. "Teruo Ishii, the Outcast." Offscreen (May 31, 2003)

Swan, Rodger. "Horrors of Malformed Men." Swan's Japanese Horror Reviews #23 (January 12, 2008)

The Joke (Czechoslovakia: Jaromil Jires, 1969: 80 mins)

Erickson, Steve. "The Art of Resistance: The brief, bright flowering of the Czech New Wave." Moving Image Source (April 24, 2012)

Kes (UK: Ken Loach, 1969: 110 mins)




Love is Colder Than Death (West Germany: Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1969: 88 mins)

Berrett, Trevor, David Blakeslee and Jordan Essoe. "Summer 1969, Part 1." Criterion Now (October 29, 2017) ["Criterion Reflections is David Blakeslee’s ongoing project to watch all of the films included in the Criterion Collection in chronological order of their original release. Each episode features panel conversations and 1:1 interviews offering insights on movies that premiered in a particular season of a year in the past, which were destined to eventually bear the Criterion imprint. In this episode, David is joined by Jordan Essoe and Trevor Berrett to discuss five titles from the Summer of 1969: Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Love is Colder than Death, Vojtech Jasný’s All My Good Countrymen, Robert Downey Sr.’s Putney Swope, Louis Malle’s Phantom India and Nagisa Oshima’s Boy."]

Medea (Italy/France/West Germany: Pier Paolo Pasolini, 1969: 110 mins)

Iannone, Pasquale. "Five Ways to Know a Pasolini Film." BFI (November 3, 2015)

Midnight Cowboy (USA: John Schlesinger, 1969: 113 mins)

Hudson, David. "Sex in the Movies." Green Cine (2005)

Landekic, Lola. "Pablo Ferro: A Career Retrospective, Part 2." Art of the Title (April 15, 2014)

Mondo Trasho (USA: John Waters, 1969: 95 mins)

Waters, John. "John Waters is On the Phone." Film Comment Podcast (April 28, 2017) ["On the occasion of Criterion Collection’s home video release of Multiple Maniacs and the publication of the filmmaker’s new book Make Trouble, Violet Lucca chats with John Waters—director, writer, artist, sometime actor (most recently of FX’s Feud: Bette and Joan), and Christmas card sender extraordinaire. Waters talks about the freedom of writing across multiple media, film critic Parker Tyler, his early days abusing zoom lenses and getting arrested for Mondo Trasho, and how his bad taste movement has been folded into the mainstream, from reality television to raunchy Hollywood comedies to the current occupant of the White House."]

My Night at Maud's (France: Eric Rohmer, 1969: 105 mins)

Falzon, Christopher. "Philosophy Through Film." International Encyclopedia of Philosophy (August 12, 2013)

Koresky, Michael and Casey Moore. "What's at the Heart of the Sadness of Christmas Movies? A Video Essay." Press Play (December 20, 2014)

Phantom India (France: Louis Malle, 1969: 378 mins)

Berrett, Trevor, David Blakeslee and Jordan Essoe. "Summer 1969, Part 1." Criterion Now (October 29, 2017) ["Criterion Reflections is David Blakeslee’s ongoing project to watch all of the films included in the Criterion Collection in chronological order of their original release. Each episode features panel conversations and 1:1 interviews offering insights on movies that premiered in a particular season of a year in the past, which were destined to eventually bear the Criterion imprint. In this episode, David is joined by Jordan Essoe and Trevor Berrett to discuss five titles from the Summer of 1969: Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Love is Colder than Death, Vojtech Jasný’s All My Good Countrymen, Robert Downey Sr.’s Putney Swope, Louis Malle’s Phantom India and Nagisa Oshima’s Boy."]

Players vs. ángeles caídos (Argentina: Alberto Fischerman, et al, 1969: 84 mins)

Cohen, Greg. "The revolution must (not) be advertised. The Players vs. Ángeles Caídos, the discourse of advertising, and the limits of political modernism." Jump Cut #56 (Winter 2014/2015)

Putney Swope (USA: Robert Downey Sr., 1969: 84 mins)

Berrett, Trevor, David Blakeslee and Jordan Essoe. "Summer 1969, Part 1." Criterion Now (October 29, 2017) ["Criterion Reflections is David Blakeslee’s ongoing project to watch all of the films included in the Criterion Collection in chronological order of their original release. Each episode features panel conversations and 1:1 interviews offering insights on movies that premiered in a particular season of a year in the past, which were destined to eventually bear the Criterion imprint. In this episode, David is joined by Jordan Essoe and Trevor Berrett to discuss five titles from the Summer of 1969: Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Love is Colder than Death, Vojtech Jasný’s All My Good Countrymen, Robert Downey Sr.’s Putney Swope, Louis Malle’s Phantom India and Nagisa Oshima’s Boy."]

The Royal Hunt of the Sun (UK/USA: Irving Lerner, 1969: 118 mins)

Castle, Robert. "Two Cinematic Visions of the Inca Conquest: The Royal Hunt of the Sun and Aguirre: Wrath of God." Bright Lights Film Journal #76 (May 2012)

They Shoot Horses, Don't They (USA: Sydney Pollack, 1969: 129 mins)

Kuersten, Erich. "The Primal Father (CinemArchetypes #8)." Acidemic (March 19, 2012)

True Grit (USA: Henry Hathaway, 1969: 128 mins)

Freedman, Carl. "Post-Hetrosexuality: John Wayne and the Construction of American Masculinity." Film International 5.1 (2007) [Professor has a copy]

Venus in Furs (UK/West Germany/Italy: Jess Franco, 1969: 86 mins)

Kuersten, Erich. "CinemArchetype #5: The Human Sacrifice." Acidemic (February 28, 2012)

The Wedding Party (USA: Brian De Palma, 1969: 92 mins)

McNeil, Jeremiah, et al. "The Radical Comedies of Brian De Palma (1968-1980)." Illusion Travels By Streetcar #98 (April 7, 2016)

The Wild Bunch (USA: Sam Peckinpah, 1969: 145 mins)

LoBrutto, Vincent. "Screen Violence as Metaphor: The Wild Bunch." Becoming Film Literate: The Art and Craft of Motion Pictures. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2005: 326-332. [BCTC Library: PN1994 L595 2005]

McGee, Patrick. From Shane to Kill Bill: Rethinking the Western. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2007.[Professor has copy]






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