Friday, December 23, 2011

ENG 282: 1970s

1970

The Clowns (Italy/France/West Germany: Federico Fellini, 1970: 92 mins)

Axemaker, Sean. "Send in THE CLOWNS: Fellini’s documentary pageant of the great clowns of Italy, France, and Britain is also a wake for the end of the circus clown era." Keyframe (January 10, 2014)

Companeros (Italy/West Germany: Sergio Corbucci, 1970: 118 mins)

Hancock, James and Tony Stella. "The Best Spaghetti Westerns (Not Directed by Leone)." Wrong Reel #264 (May 2017)

Count Dracula (Spain/West Germany/Italy: Jess Franco, 1970: 98 mins)

Deighan, Samm and Kat Ellinger. "Lust for a Female Vampire: The Evolution of Lesbian Vampires in Cinema, Part 2." Daughters of Darkness #2 (March 28, 2017) ["Kat and Samm continue their three-part discussion of lesbian vampire films, this time with a focus on European cult directors like Jess Franco, Jean Rollin, and Walerian Borowczyk. They begin their discussion with the career of the prolific Jess Franco, who produced a number of films with lesbian vampire themes, namely Vampyros Lesbos (1971). This starred his first muse, Soledad Miranda, as the mysterious Countess Carody, who sunbathes by day but thirsts for blood at night. Franco also adapted Bram Stoker’s novel with the relatively traditional Count Dracula (1970), but continued to explore his own perverse variations on vampire mythology in Dracula’s Daughter (1972) and the explicit Female Vampire (1975), with his longtime partner Lina Romay. Also explored is the work of French director Jean Rollin, known for his dreamlike, often surreal vampire films such as The Rape of the Vampire (1968), The Nude Vampire (1970), The Shiver of the Vampires (1971), and Requiem for a Vampire (1973). While these films infrequently use overt depictions of lesbianism, they are generally concerned with pairs or groups of female vampires banded together against the world. In films like Fascination (1979), about blood-drinking socialites, and The Living Dead Girl (1982), the tragic tale of a love that survives beyond death, Rollin expanded on his early themes. The episode concludes with a discussion of a few films that touch upon the legend of historical murderer and alleged blood-drinker Elizabeth Bathory. Most importantly is Belgian film Daughters of Darkness (1971), the podcast’s namesake, which follows a newly married couple who encounter an elegant and possibly ageless woman at a seaside hotel."]

Dodes'ka-den (Japan: Akira Kurosawa, 1970: 140 mins)

Hogg, Trevor. "Epic Dreamer: An Akira Kurosawa Profile." Flickering Myth (March 24, 2010)

El Topo (Mexico: Alejandro Jodorowsky, 1970: 125 mins)

Dollar, Steve. "Interview of Alejandro Jodorowsky." Green Cine Daily (May 21, 2011)

Five Easy Pieces (USA: Bob Rafelson, 1970: 98 mins)

Barton-Fumo, Margaret, Molly Haskell and Violet Lucca. "Women in New Hollywood." Film Comment Podcast (February 7, 2017) ["Road-tripping crises of masculinity soundtracked by classic rock, Harvey Keitel making up for his sins in the streets—a laundry list of 1970s New Hollywood highlights can tend to lack a nuanced female presence. But the ’70s also gave us Wanda, Puzzle of a Downfall Child, Girlfriends, A Woman Under the Influence, and even Five Easy Pieces, all of which explore female identity in the era of second-wave feminism. This episode of the Film Comment podcast spirals outwards from From Reverence to Rape author Molly Haskell’s essay on Mike Mills’s 20th Century Women and accompanying interview with Annette Bening, in the January/February issue, taking a closer look at depictions of women in New Hollywood. Some of these were “neo-women’s films,” dealing with disillusioned housewives fleeing the domestic sphere; others took on female friendship without turning a blind eye to its messiness, a line that runs through Thelma and Louise, Frances Ha, and Broad City."]

Fruit of Paradise (Czechoslavakia/Belgium: Vera Chytilová, 1970: 99 mins)

Harvey, Dennis. "DAISIES’ Chain: Czech New Wave High Points." Keyframe (June 7, 2012) ["A Pacific Film Archive series with two Věra Chytilová classics highlights an unforgettable era."]

Hudson, David. "Věra Chytilová, 1929 – 2014." Keyframe (March 12, 2014) ["Best known for DAISIES (1966), Chytilová was a major figure in Czech cinema."]

Hi, Mom (USA: Brian De Palma, 1970: 87 mins)

McNeil, Jeremiah, et al. "The Radical Comedies of Brian De Palma (1968-1980)." Illusion Travels By Streetcar #98 (April 7, 2016)

Husbands (USA: John Cassavetes, 1970: 131 mins)

Palmer, Landon. "6 Filmmaking Tips From John Cassavettes." Film School Rejects (August 13, 2014)

King: A Filmed Record ... From Montgomery to Memphis (USA: Sydney Lumet and Joseph L. Mankiewicz, 1970: 185 mins)

Kaplan, Richard. "The Memory and Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr." Film Wax Radio (January 19, 2015)

Le Cercle Rouge (France/Italy: Jean-Pierre Melville, 1970: 140 mins)

Lane, Anthony. "Jean-Pierre Melville's Cinema of Resistance." The New Yorker (May 1, 2017) ["His films are illuminated by what he saw when France was ruled by oppression and ordinary people had to decide what, or whom, they would obey."]

Multiple Maniacs (USA: John Waters, 1970: 91 mins)

Bradley, S.A. "Gag Reflex: The Cinema Crimes of John Waters." Hellbent for Horror #37 (April 7, 2017)

Myra Breckenridge (USA: Michael Sarne, 1970: 94 mins)

Kloman, Harry. "Myra Breckinridge & Myron: An Introduction." University of Pittsburgh: 2005.

The Nude Vampire (France: Jean Rollin, 1970: 88 mins)

Deighan, Samm and Kat Ellinger. "Lust for a Female Vampire: The Evolution of Lesbian Vampires in Cinema, Part 2." Daughters of Darkness #2 (March 28, 2017) ["Kat and Samm continue their three-part discussion of lesbian vampire films, this time with a focus on European cult directors like Jess Franco, Jean Rollin, and Walerian Borowczyk. They begin their discussion with the career of the prolific Jess Franco, who produced a number of films with lesbian vampire themes, namely Vampyros Lesbos (1971). This starred his first muse, Soledad Miranda, as the mysterious Countess Carody, who sunbathes by day but thirsts for blood at night. Franco also adapted Bram Stoker’s novel with the relatively traditional Count Dracula (1970), but continued to explore his own perverse variations on vampire mythology in Dracula’s Daughter (1972) and the explicit Female Vampire (1975), with his longtime partner Lina Romay. Also explored is the work of French director Jean Rollin, known for his dreamlike, often surreal vampire films such as The Rape of the Vampire (1968), The Nude Vampire (1970), The Shiver of the Vampires (1971), and Requiem for a Vampire (1973). While these films infrequently use overt depictions of lesbianism, they are generally concerned with pairs or groups of female vampires banded together against the world. In films like Fascination (1979), about blood-drinking socialites, and The Living Dead Girl (1982), the tragic tale of a love that survives beyond death, Rollin expanded on his early themes. The episode concludes with a discussion of a few films that touch upon the legend of historical murderer and alleged blood-drinker Elizabeth Bathory. Most importantly is Belgian film Daughters of Darkness (1971), the podcast’s namesake, which follows a newly married couple who encounter an elegant and possibly ageless woman at a seaside hotel."]

Patton (USA: Franklin J. Schaffner, 1970: 172 mins)

Lichtblau, Eric. "The Nazis Next Door: Eric Lichtblau on how the CIA & FBI Secretly Sheltered Nazi War Criminals." Democracy Now (October 31, 2014)

---. "Pt. 2: On The Nazis Next Door: How America Became a Safe Haven for Hitler’s Men." Democracy Now (October 31, 2014)

Puzzle of a Downfall Child (USA: Jerry Schatzberg, 1970: 105 mins)

Ackerman, Bill, et al. "Puzzle of a Downfall Child." The Projection Booth #309 (February 7, 2017)  ["Jerry Schatzberg's Puzzle of a Downfall Child (1970) stars Faye Dunaway as Lou Andreas Sand, a model who has been used up and discarded by the fashion industry. Her former photographer and lover, Aaron (Barry Primus) interviews Lou, allowing screenwriter Carole Eastman to take the audience back and forth in a fracture time structure, allowing us to see the pieces of the puzzle that is Lou."]

Barton-Fumo, Margaret, Molly Haskell and Violet Lucca. "Women in New Hollywood." Film Comment Podcast (February 7, 2017) ["Road-tripping crises of masculinity soundtracked by classic rock, Harvey Keitel making up for his sins in the streets—a laundry list of 1970s New Hollywood highlights can tend to lack a nuanced female presence. But the ’70s also gave us Wanda, Puzzle of a Downfall Child, Girlfriends, A Woman Under the Influence, and even Five Easy Pieces, all of which explore female identity in the era of second-wave feminism. This episode of the Film Comment podcast spirals outwards from From Reverence to Rape author Molly Haskell’s essay on Mike Mills’s 20th Century Women and accompanying interview with Annette Bening, in the January/February issue, taking a closer look at depictions of women in New Hollywood. Some of these were “neo-women’s films,” dealing with disillusioned housewives fleeing the domestic sphere; others took on female friendship without turning a blind eye to its messiness, a line that runs through Thelma and Louise, Frances Ha, and Broad City."]

Sometimes a Great Notion (USA: Paul Newman, 1970: 114 mins)

Bradley, S.A. "Killed by Death." Hellbent for Horror #33 (February 27, 2017)

The Vampire Lovers (UK/USA: Roy Ward Baker, 1970: 91 mins)

Deighan, Samm and Kat Ellinger. "Lust for a Female Vampire Lover: The Evolution of Lesbian Vampires in Cinema, Part 1." Daughters of Darkness #1 (March 12, 2016)  ["This first episode of three begins by examining the lesbian vampire from her origins in eighteenth century Gothic literature, particularly Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s unfinished poem “Christabel” (1797) and Irish writer Sheridan Le Fanu’s story “Carmilla” (1871), both of which explore themes of monstrosity, repressed sexuality, and female identity. “Carmilla” — the source material for the majority of lesbian vampire films — follows a lonely young woman named Laura, who makes a strange, seductive new friend, Carmilla, whose designs on Laura are decidedly sanguinary. Carl Theodor Dreyer’s surreal horror film Vampyr (1932) was the first to adapt “Carmilla,” however loosely, but was followed soon after by the more straightforward Universal horror film, Dracula’s Daughter (1936). The latter — with its depiction of an elegant, sympathetic female vampire reluctantly driven to act out her bloodlust out on female as well as male victims — was among the first to portray vampirism as a blend of madness, female hysteria, sexual dysfunction, and addiction. Dracula’s Daughter would influence subsequent adaptations of “Carmilla,” like Roger Vadim’s lush arthouse effort Blood and Roses (1960) and obscure Italian Gothic horror film Crypt of the Vampire (1964). The film co-starred Hammer star Christopher Lee, who spends much of the running time in an outrageous smoking jacket. Speaking of Hammer studios, the episode wraps up with a discussion of their Karnstein trilogy, a watershed moment for lesbian vampire cinema. Films like The Vampire Lovers (1970), Lust for a Vampire (1971), and Twins of Evil (1971) — as well as some of the studio’s outlier efforts like The Brides of Dracula (1960) or Countess Dracula (1971) — left a bloody mark on vampire films. With minimal violence and plenty of nudity from buxom starlets like Ingrid Pitt, these films generally depict aristocratic vampires preying on innocent young ladies in pastoral settings. A film like The Vampire Lovers was famous for its use of lesbianism and casual nudity, but is quite restrained compared to the films discussed in episode two by European directors like Jess Franco and Jean Rollin."]

Wanda (USA: Barbara Loden, 1970: 102 mins)

Barton-Fumo, Margaret, Molly Haskell and Violet Lucca. "Women in New Hollywood." Film Comment Podcast (February 7, 2017) ["Road-tripping crises of masculinity soundtracked by classic rock, Harvey Keitel making up for his sins in the streets—a laundry list of 1970s New Hollywood highlights can tend to lack a nuanced female presence. But the ’70s also gave us Wanda, Puzzle of a Downfall Child, Girlfriends, A Woman Under the Influence, and even Five Easy Pieces, all of which explore female identity in the era of second-wave feminism. This episode of the Film Comment podcast spirals outwards from From Reverence to Rape author Molly Haskell’s essay on Mike Mills’s 20th Century Women and accompanying interview with Annette Bening, in the January/February issue, taking a closer look at depictions of women in New Hollywood. Some of these were “neo-women’s films,” dealing with disillusioned housewives fleeing the domestic sphere; others took on female friendship without turning a blind eye to its messiness, a line that runs through Thelma and Louise, Frances Ha, and Broad City."]

Longworth, Karina. "Barbara Loden (Dead Blondes Episode 12)." You Must Remember This (April 17, 2017) ["Barbara Loden won a Tony Award for playing a character based on Marilyn Monroe in Arthur Miller’s After the Fall. Like Marilyn, Barbara was a beauty with no pedigree who fled a hopeless upbringing in search of the fulfillment of fame. Like Marilyn, Loden found some measure of security as the mistress (and eventual wife) of a powerful man, in Loden’s case Elia Kazan. But instead of satisfying her, her small taste of fame and her relationship with Kazan left Barbara Loden wanting more, which would lead her to write, direct and star in a groundbreaking independent movie of her own."]

Why Does Herr R. Run Amok? (West Germany: Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1970: 88 Mins)

Hoberman, J. "The Single Antidote to Thoughts of Suicide: Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s American friends." Moving Image Source (June 28, 2012)

1971

The Andromeda Strain (USA: Robert Wise, 1971: 131 mins)

Cox, Alex. "The Andromeda Strain." Moviedrome (August 13, 2014)

A Touch of Zen (Taiwan: King Hu, 1971: 200 mins)

Bordwell, David. "A Touch of Zen: Prowling, Scheming, Flying." Current (July 20, 2016)
Bananas (USA: Woody Allen, 1971: 82 mins)

D'anna, Becky, James Hancock and Jacob Rivera. "Woody." Wrong Reel #205 (November 2016) ["Wide ranging discussion of his comedies prefaced by some clear analysis of his personal controversies"]

The Beguiled (USA: Don Siegel, 1971: 105 mins)

King, Danny. "Clint, Caught in the Act: On The Beguiled, and Don Siegel's Leading Man." Bright Lights Film Journal #82 (November 2013)

Beware of a Holy Whore (West Germany/Italy: Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1971: 103 mins)

Hudson, David. "Fassbinder: Romantic Anarchist (Part 1).” Keyframe (May 16, 2014)

Big Jake (USA: George Sherman and John Wayne, 1971: 110 mins)

Freedman, Carl. "Post-Hetrosexuality: John Wayne and the Construction of American Masculinity." Film International 5.1 (2007) [Professor has a copy]

Blood on Satan's Claw (UK: Piers Haggard, 1971: 97 mins)

Kuersten, Erich. "CinemArchetype #5: The Human Sacrifice." Acidemic (February 28, 2012)

Countess Dracula (UK: Peter Sasdy, 1971: 93 mins)

Deighan, Samm and Kat Ellinger. "Lust for a Female Vampire Lover: The Evolution of Lesbian Vampires in Cinema, Part 1." Daughters of Darkness #1 (March 12, 2016)  ["This first episode of three begins by examining the lesbian vampire from her origins in eighteenth century Gothic literature, particularly Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s unfinished poem “Christabel” (1797) and Irish writer Sheridan Le Fanu’s story “Carmilla” (1871), both of which explore themes of monstrosity, repressed sexuality, and female identity. “Carmilla” — the source material for the majority of lesbian vampire films — follows a lonely young woman named Laura, who makes a strange, seductive new friend, Carmilla, whose designs on Laura are decidedly sanguinary. Carl Theodor Dreyer’s surreal horror film Vampyr (1932) was the first to adapt “Carmilla,” however loosely, but was followed soon after by the more straightforward Universal horror film, Dracula’s Daughter (1936). The latter — with its depiction of an elegant, sympathetic female vampire reluctantly driven to act out her bloodlust out on female as well as male victims — was among the first to portray vampirism as a blend of madness, female hysteria, sexual dysfunction, and addiction. Dracula’s Daughter would influence subsequent adaptations of “Carmilla,” like Roger Vadim’s lush arthouse effort Blood and Roses (1960) and obscure Italian Gothic horror film Crypt of the Vampire (1964). The film co-starred Hammer star Christopher Lee, who spends much of the running time in an outrageous smoking jacket. Speaking of Hammer studios, the episode wraps up with a discussion of their Karnstein trilogy, a watershed moment for lesbian vampire cinema. Films like The Vampire Lovers (1970), Lust for a Vampire (1971), and Twins of Evil (1971) — as well as some of the studio’s outlier efforts like The Brides of Dracula (1960) or Countess Dracula (1971) — left a bloody mark on vampire films. With minimal violence and plenty of nudity from buxom starlets like Ingrid Pitt, these films generally depict aristocratic vampires preying on innocent young ladies in pastoral settings. A film like The Vampire Lovers was famous for its use of lesbianism and casual nudity, but is quite restrained compared to the films discussed in episode two by European directors like Jess Franco and Jean Rollin."]

Daughters of Darkness (Belgium/France/West Germany: Harry Kümel, 1971: 87 mins)

Deighan, Samm and Kat Ellinger. "Lust for a Female Vampire: The Evolution of Lesbian Vampires in Cinema, Part 2." Daughters of Darkness #2 (March 28, 2017) ["Kat and Samm continue their three-part discussion of lesbian vampire films, this time with a focus on European cult directors like Jess Franco, Jean Rollin, and Walerian Borowczyk. They begin their discussion with the career of the prolific Jess Franco, who produced a number of films with lesbian vampire themes, namely Vampyros Lesbos (1971). This starred his first muse, Soledad Miranda, as the mysterious Countess Carody, who sunbathes by day but thirsts for blood at night. Franco also adapted Bram Stoker’s novel with the relatively traditional Count Dracula (1970), but continued to explore his own perverse variations on vampire mythology in Dracula’s Daughter (1972) and the explicit Female Vampire (1975), with his longtime partner Lina Romay. Also explored is the work of French director Jean Rollin, known for his dreamlike, often surreal vampire films such as The Rape of the Vampire (1968), The Nude Vampire (1970), The Shiver of the Vampires (1971), and Requiem for a Vampire (1973). While these films infrequently use overt depictions of lesbianism, they are generally concerned with pairs or groups of female vampires banded together against the world. In films like Fascination (1979), about blood-drinking socialites, and The Living Dead Girl (1982), the tragic tale of a love that survives beyond death, Rollin expanded on his early themes. The episode concludes with a discussion of a few films that touch upon the legend of historical murderer and alleged blood-drinker Elizabeth Bathory. Most importantly is Belgian film Daughters of Darkness (1971), the podcast’s namesake, which follows a newly married couple who encounter an elegant and possibly ageless woman at a seaside hotel."]

The Decameron (Italy/France/West Germany: Pier Paolo Pasolini, 1971: 112 mins)

Iannone, Pasquale. "Five Ways to Know a Pasolini Film." BFI (November 3, 2015)

Sachs, Ben. "Forces of the past in Only Lovers Left Alive and Pasolini's Trilogy of Life." The Chicago Reader (April 30, 2014)


Dirty Harry (USA: Don Siegel, 1971: 102 mins)

Doherty, Thomas. "Portraits of a Serial Killer: A time-honored public enemy, from Dirty Harry to Zodiac." Moving Image Source (June 12, 2008)

Duel (USA: Steven Spielberg, 1971: 90 mins)

Digging Deeper. "Vehicles of Masculinity." (Posted on Youtube: October 26, 2015)

Fiddler on the Roof (USA: Norman Jewison, 1971: 181 mins)

Horowitz, Joy. "Too Jewish?: The Making of Fiddler on the Roof." Los Angeles Review of Books (October 30, 2014)

Fists of Fury (aka The Big Boss - Hong Kong: Wei Lo, 1971: 99 mins)

Hancock, James and Tony Stella. "The Legacy of the Dragon, Bruce Lee." Wrong Reel #245 (March 2017)

The French Connection (USA: William Friedkin, 1971: 104 mins)

LoBrutto, Vincent. "New York Filmmaking: The French Connection." Becoming Film Literate: The Art and Craft of Motion Pictures. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2005: 151-157. [BCTC Library: PN1994 L595 2005]

Goodbye Uncle Tom (Italy: Gualtiero Jacopetti and Franco Prosperi, 1971: 123 mins)

Clark, Ashley. "Alien abductions: 12 Years a Slave and the past as science fiction."  Sight and Sound (April 14, 2015)

Klute (USA: Alan J. Pakula, 1971: 114 mins)

Kuersten Erich. "CinemArchetype #6: The Intimidating Nymph." Acidemic (March 2, 2012)

Lust for a Vampire (UK: Jimmy Sangster, 1971: 91 mins)

Deighan, Samm and Kat Ellinger. "Lust for a Female Vampire Lover: The Evolution of Lesbian Vampires in Cinema, Part 1." Daughters of Darkness #1 (March 12, 2016)  ["This first episode of three begins by examining the lesbian vampire from her origins in eighteenth century Gothic literature, particularly Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s unfinished poem “Christabel” (1797) and Irish writer Sheridan Le Fanu’s story “Carmilla” (1871), both of which explore themes of monstrosity, repressed sexuality, and female identity. “Carmilla” — the source material for the majority of lesbian vampire films — follows a lonely young woman named Laura, who makes a strange, seductive new friend, Carmilla, whose designs on Laura are decidedly sanguinary. Carl Theodor Dreyer’s surreal horror film Vampyr (1932) was the first to adapt “Carmilla,” however loosely, but was followed soon after by the more straightforward Universal horror film, Dracula’s Daughter (1936). The latter — with its depiction of an elegant, sympathetic female vampire reluctantly driven to act out her bloodlust out on female as well as male victims — was among the first to portray vampirism as a blend of madness, female hysteria, sexual dysfunction, and addiction. Dracula’s Daughter would influence subsequent adaptations of “Carmilla,” like Roger Vadim’s lush arthouse effort Blood and Roses (1960) and obscure Italian Gothic horror film Crypt of the Vampire (1964). The film co-starred Hammer star Christopher Lee, who spends much of the running time in an outrageous smoking jacket. Speaking of Hammer studios, the episode wraps up with a discussion of their Karnstein trilogy, a watershed moment for lesbian vampire cinema. Films like The Vampire Lovers (1970), Lust for a Vampire (1971), and Twins of Evil (1971) — as well as some of the studio’s outlier efforts like The Brides of Dracula (1960) or Countess Dracula (1971) — left a bloody mark on vampire films. With minimal violence and plenty of nudity from buxom starlets like Ingrid Pitt, these films generally depict aristocratic vampires preying on innocent young ladies in pastoral settings. A film like The Vampire Lovers was famous for its use of lesbianism and casual nudity, but is quite restrained compared to the films discussed in episode two by European directors like Jess Franco and Jean Rollin."]

The Merchant of Four Seasons (West Germany: Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1971: 88 mins)

Hoberman, J. "The Single Antidote to Thoughts of Suicide: Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s American friends." Moving Image Source (June 28, 2012)

Mon Oncle Antoine (Canada: Claude Jutra, 1971: 104 mins)

Koresky, Michael and Casey Moore. "What's at the Heart of the Sadness of Christmas Movies? A Video Essay." Press Play (December 20, 2014)

Murmur of the Heart (France/Italy/West Germany: Louis Malle, 1971: 118 mins)

Sragow, Michael. "Murmur of the Heart: All in the Family." The Current (March 27, 2006)

Punishment Park (USA: Peter Watkins, 1971: 88 mins)

Kaufmann, Anthony. "It's Happening Here: Trump's America and Totalitarian Dystopias." Keyframe (November 17, 2016)

"Punishment Park." Masters of Cinema (March 27, 2013)

The Shiver of the Vampires (France: Jean Rollin, 1971: 95 mins) 

Deighan, Samm and Kat Ellinger. "Lust for a Female Vampire: The Evolution of Lesbian Vampires in Cinema, Part 2." Daughters of Darkness #2 (March 28, 2017) ["Kat and Samm continue their three-part discussion of lesbian vampire films, this time with a focus on European cult directors like Jess Franco, Jean Rollin, and Walerian Borowczyk. They begin their discussion with the career of the prolific Jess Franco, who produced a number of films with lesbian vampire themes, namely Vampyros Lesbos (1971). This starred his first muse, Soledad Miranda, as the mysterious Countess Carody, who sunbathes by day but thirsts for blood at night. Franco also adapted Bram Stoker’s novel with the relatively traditional Count Dracula (1970), but continued to explore his own perverse variations on vampire mythology in Dracula’s Daughter (1972) and the explicit Female Vampire (1975), with his longtime partner Lina Romay. Also explored is the work of French director Jean Rollin, known for his dreamlike, often surreal vampire films such as The Rape of the Vampire (1968), The Nude Vampire (1970), The Shiver of the Vampires (1971), and Requiem for a Vampire (1973). While these films infrequently use overt depictions of lesbianism, they are generally concerned with pairs or groups of female vampires banded together against the world. In films like Fascination (1979), about blood-drinking socialites, and The Living Dead Girl (1982), the tragic tale of a love that survives beyond death, Rollin expanded on his early themes. The episode concludes with a discussion of a few films that touch upon the legend of historical murderer and alleged blood-drinker Elizabeth Bathory. Most importantly is Belgian film Daughters of Darkness (1971), the podcast’s namesake, which follows a newly married couple who encounter an elegant and possibly ageless woman at a seaside hotel."]

The Third Part of the Night (Poland: Andrzej Zulawski, 1971: 105 mins)

The Ferroni Brigade. "Beginnings Are Useless: A Conversation with Andrzej Żuławski." Notebook (March 12, 2012)

Kwiatkowski, Al and Brad Strauss. "Andrzej Zulawski." Director's Club #126 (March 14, 2017)

THX 1138 (USA: George Lucas, 1971: 86 mins)

Lee, Kevin B. and Volker Pantenburg. "Motion Studies #7: Low Budget Eye Candy." Press Play (March 29, 2012)

Twins of Evil (UK: John Hough, 1971: 87 mins)

Deighan, Samm and Kat Ellinger. "Lust for a Female Vampire Lover: The Evolution of Lesbian Vampires in Cinema, Part 1." Daughters of Darkness #1 (March 12, 2016)  ["This first episode of three begins by examining the lesbian vampire from her origins in eighteenth century Gothic literature, particularly Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s unfinished poem “Christabel” (1797) and Irish writer Sheridan Le Fanu’s story “Carmilla” (1871), both of which explore themes of monstrosity, repressed sexuality, and female identity. “Carmilla” — the source material for the majority of lesbian vampire films — follows a lonely young woman named Laura, who makes a strange, seductive new friend, Carmilla, whose designs on Laura are decidedly sanguinary. Carl Theodor Dreyer’s surreal horror film Vampyr (1932) was the first to adapt “Carmilla,” however loosely, but was followed soon after by the more straightforward Universal horror film, Dracula’s Daughter (1936). The latter — with its depiction of an elegant, sympathetic female vampire reluctantly driven to act out her bloodlust out on female as well as male victims — was among the first to portray vampirism as a blend of madness, female hysteria, sexual dysfunction, and addiction. Dracula’s Daughter would influence subsequent adaptations of “Carmilla,” like Roger Vadim’s lush arthouse effort Blood and Roses (1960) and obscure Italian Gothic horror film Crypt of the Vampire (1964). The film co-starred Hammer star Christopher Lee, who spends much of the running time in an outrageous smoking jacket. Speaking of Hammer studios, the episode wraps up with a discussion of their Karnstein trilogy, a watershed moment for lesbian vampire cinema. Films like The Vampire Lovers (1970), Lust for a Vampire (1971), and Twins of Evil (1971) — as well as some of the studio’s outlier efforts like The Brides of Dracula (1960) or Countess Dracula (1971) — left a bloody mark on vampire films. With minimal violence and plenty of nudity from buxom starlets like Ingrid Pitt, these films generally depict aristocratic vampires preying on innocent young ladies in pastoral settings. A film like The Vampire Lovers was famous for its use of lesbianism and casual nudity, but is quite restrained compared to the films discussed in episode two by European directors like Jess Franco and Jean Rollin."]

Two-Lane Blacktop (USA: Monte Hellman, 1971: 102 mins)

Phipps, Keith. "The restless dreams and lonely highways of Two-Lane Blacktop." The Dissolve (May 26, 2015)

"Two Lane Blacktop." Masters of Cinema #4 (May 23, 2013)

Vampyros Lesbos (West Germany/Spain: Jess Franco, 1971: 89 mins)

Deighan, Samm and Kat Ellinger. "Lust for a Female Vampire: The Evolution of Lesbian Vampires in Cinema, Part 2." Daughters of Darkness #2 (March 28, 2017) ["Kat and Samm continue their three-part discussion of lesbian vampire films, this time with a focus on European cult directors like Jess Franco, Jean Rollin, and Walerian Borowczyk. They begin their discussion with the career of the prolific Jess Franco, who produced a number of films with lesbian vampire themes, namely Vampyros Lesbos (1971). This starred his first muse, Soledad Miranda, as the mysterious Countess Carody, who sunbathes by day but thirsts for blood at night. Franco also adapted Bram Stoker’s novel with the relatively traditional Count Dracula (1970), but continued to explore his own perverse variations on vampire mythology in Dracula’s Daughter (1972) and the explicit Female Vampire (1975), with his longtime partner Lina Romay. Also explored is the work of French director Jean Rollin, known for his dreamlike, often surreal vampire films such as The Rape of the Vampire (1968), The Nude Vampire (1970), The Shiver of the Vampires (1971), and Requiem for a Vampire (1973). While these films infrequently use overt depictions of lesbianism, they are generally concerned with pairs or groups of female vampires banded together against the world. In films like Fascination (1979), about blood-drinking socialites, and The Living Dead Girl (1982), the tragic tale of a love that survives beyond death, Rollin expanded on his early themes. The episode concludes with a discussion of a few films that touch upon the legend of historical murderer and alleged blood-drinker Elizabeth Bathory. Most importantly is Belgian film Daughters of Darkness (1971), the podcast’s namesake, which follows a newly married couple who encounter an elegant and possibly ageless woman at a seaside hotel."]

Wake in Fright (Australia/USA: Ted Kotcheff, 1971: 108 mins)

Buckley, Anthoney, et al. "Wake in Fright." The Projection Booth #271 (May 17, 2016) ["Based on the novel by Kenneth Cook, Ted Kotcheff'sWake in Fright stars Gary Bond as a teacher in the Outback who loses all his money and goes on a wild, bloody holiday."]

Willie Wonka and the Chocolate Factory (USA: Mel Stuart, 1971: 100 mins)

Wilder, Gene. "On the Truth." (Posted on Youtube: May 6, 2014)


1972

The Age of Medici (Italy: Roberto Rossellini, 1972-1973: 255 mins)

Gallagher, Tag. "Eclipse Series 14: Rossellini’s History Films—Renaissance and Enlightenment." Current (December 25, 2008)

Behind the Green Door (USA: Artie Mitchell and Jim Mitchell, 1972: 72 mins)

Hudson, David. "Sex in the Movies." Green Cine (2005)

The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant (West Germany: Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1972: 124 mins)

Hudson, David. "Fassbinder: Romantic Anarchist (Part 1).” Keyframe (May 16, 2014)

Blaise Pascal (Italy: Roberto Rossellini, 1972: 135 mins)

Gallagher, Tag. "Eclipse Series 14: Rossellini’s History Films—Renaissance and Enlightenment." Current (December 25, 2008)

Cabaret (USA: Bob Fosse, 1972: 124 mins)

Anderson, Barry, et al. "The Bob Fosse Experience (1968 - 1983)." Illusion Travels by Streetcar #138 (February 1, 2017)





Caliber 9 (Italy: Fernando di Leo, 1972: 88 mins)

Axmaker, Sean. "Fernando Di Leo, in the Shadow of THE GODFATHER." Keyframe (March 12, 2014) ["There is no loyalty, and really no family—there is just money and power and violence: Fernando Di Leo’s pulp fiction dismantlings."]

The Candidate (USA: Michael Ritchie, 1972: 110 mins)

McChesney, Robert W. and John Nichols. "The Bull Market: Political Advertising." Monthly Review (April 1, 2012)

The Canterbury Tales (Italy/France: Pier Paolo Pasolini, 1972: 112 mins)

Iannone, Pasquale. "Five Ways to Know a Pasolini Film." BFI (November 3, 2015)

Deep Throat (USA: Gerard Damiano, 1972: 61 mins)

Hudson, David. "Sex in the Movies." Green Cine (2005)

The Devil (Poland: Andrzej Zulawski, 1972: 119 mins)

The Ferroni Brigade. "Beginnings Are Useless: A Conversation with Andrzej Żuławski." Notebook (March 12, 2012)

Kwiatkowski, Al and Brad Strauss. "Andrzej Zulawski." Director's Club #126 (March 14, 2017)

The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie (France: Luis Buñuel, 1972: 102 mins)

Scott, A.O. "Critics' Picks: The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie." The New York Times (April 28, 2009)

Dracula's Daughter (France/Portugal: Jess Franco, 1972: 87 mins)

Deighan, Samm and Kat Ellinger. "Lust for a Female Vampire: The Evolution of Lesbian Vampires in Cinema, Part 2." Daughters of Darkness #2 (March 28, 2017) ["Kat and Samm continue their three-part discussion of lesbian vampire films, this time with a focus on European cult directors like Jess Franco, Jean Rollin, and Walerian Borowczyk. They begin their discussion with the career of the prolific Jess Franco, who produced a number of films with lesbian vampire themes, namely Vampyros Lesbos (1971). This starred his first muse, Soledad Miranda, as the mysterious Countess Carody, who sunbathes by day but thirsts for blood at night. Franco also adapted Bram Stoker’s novel with the relatively traditional Count Dracula (1970), but continued to explore his own perverse variations on vampire mythology in Dracula’s Daughter (1972) and the explicit Female Vampire (1975), with his longtime partner Lina Romay. Also explored is the work of French director Jean Rollin, known for his dreamlike, often surreal vampire films such as The Rape of the Vampire (1968), The Nude Vampire (1970), The Shiver of the Vampires (1971), and Requiem for a Vampire (1973). While these films infrequently use overt depictions of lesbianism, they are generally concerned with pairs or groups of female vampires banded together against the world. In films like Fascination (1979), about blood-drinking socialites, and The Living Dead Girl (1982), the tragic tale of a love that survives beyond death, Rollin expanded on his early themes. The episode concludes with a discussion of a few films that touch upon the legend of historical murderer and alleged blood-drinker Elizabeth Bathory. Most importantly is Belgian film Daughters of Darkness (1971), the podcast’s namesake, which follows a newly married couple who encounter an elegant and possibly ageless woman at a seaside hotel."]

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex * But Were Afraid to Ask (USA: Woody Allen, 1972: 88 mins)

D'anna, Becky, James Hancock and Jacob Rivera. "Woody." Wrong Reel #205 (November 2016) ["Wide ranging discussion of his comedies prefaced by some clear analysis of his personal controversies"]

"Female Prisoner #701: Scorpion." (Japan: Shun'ya Itô, 1972: 87 mins)

Bell, Nicholas and Erik McClanahan. "Female Prisoner Scorpion." The Playlist (August 26, 2016)

Get To Know Your Rabbit (USA: Brian De Palma, 1972: 91 mins)

McNeil, Jeremiah, et al. "The Radical Comedies of Brian De Palma (1968-1980)." Illusion Travels By Streetcar #98 (April 7, 2016)

Hotel Monterey (Belgium/USA: Chantal Ackerman, 1972: 65 mins)

Berrett, Trevor, David Blakeslee and Lady P. "Chantal Ackerman in the Seventies." #42 (April 29, 2016) ["Over the past four decades, Belgian director Chantal Akerman (Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles) has created one of cinema’s most distinctive bodies of work—formally daring, often autobiographical films about people and places, time and space. In this collection, we present the early films that put her on the map: intensely personal, modernist investigations of cities, history, family, and sexuality, made in the 1970s in the United States and Europe and strongly influenced by the New York experimental film scene. Bold and iconoclastic, these five films pushed boundaries in their day and continue to have a profound influence on filmmakers all over the world."]

Images (UK/USA: Robert Altman, 1972: 101 mins)

Langill, Molly. "‘Mad Women’ in Robert Altman’s 3 Women and Images." Offscreen 18.8 (August 2014)



Tafoya, Scout. "The Post-Punk Cinema Manifesto." Keyframe (September 10, 2015)

The Italian Connection (Italy/West Germany: Fernando di Leo, 1972: 95 mins)

Axmaker, Sean. "Fernando Di Leo, in the Shadow of THE GODFATHER." Keyframe (March 12, 2014) ["There is no loyalty, and really no family—there is just money and power and violence: Fernando Di Leo’s pulp fiction dismantlings."]

The Last House on the Left (USA: Wes Craven, 1972: 84 mins)



Last Tango in Paris (France/Italy: Bernardo Bertolucci, 1972: 136 mins)

Anderson, Ariston. "Last Tango in Paris Cinematographer: Nothing Happened During the Shooting.'" The Hollywood Reporter (December 6, 2016)

Hudson, David. "Sex in the Movies." Green Cine (2005)

Le Chambre (Belgium: Chantal Ackerman, 1972: 11 mins)

Berrett, Trevor, David Blakeslee and Lady P. "Chantal Ackerman in the Seventies." #42 (April 29, 2016) ["Over the past four decades, Belgian director Chantal Akerman (Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles) has created one of cinema’s most distinctive bodies of work—formally daring, often autobiographical films about people and places, time and space. In this collection, we present the early films that put her on the map: intensely personal, modernist investigations of cities, history, family, and sexuality, made in the 1970s in the United States and Europe and strongly influenced by the New York experimental film scene. Bold and iconoclastic, these five films pushed boundaries in their day and continue to have a profound influence on filmmakers all over the world."]

Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart at the River Styx (Japan: Kenji Misumi, 1972: 81 mins)

Kohagen, Axel, Geoff Todd and Mike White. "The Lone Wolf and Cub Saga." The Projection Booth #303 (December 31, 2016) ["The Lone Wolf & Cub Films (also known as the Babycart Films, the Kozure Okami Films, the Shogun Assassin series and more) are six movies released from 1972-1974 starring Tomisaburo Wakayama as Ogami Itto, the Shogun's decapitator. After he's framed by the villainous Yagyu clan, he travels the countryside with his young son in a tricked-out baby cart as an assassin and son for hire. Adapted from the manga by author Kazuo Koike, the films are both gorgeously contemplative and gory bloodbaths. Geoff Todd and Axel Kohagen join Mike to discuss the original manga, the television adaptations, the 1989 follow-up film, the 1992 reboot, and a handful of influences that the films have had on American popular culture."]

Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart in Peril  (Japan: Buichi Saitô, 1972: 81 mins)

Kohagen, Axel, Geoff Todd and Mike White. "The Lone Wolf and Cub Saga." The Projection Booth #303 (December 31, 2016) ["The Lone Wolf & Cub Films (also known as the Babycart Films, the Kozure Okami Films, the Shogun Assassin series and more) are six movies released from 1972-1974 starring Tomisaburo Wakayama as Ogami Itto, the Shogun's decapitator. After he's framed by the villainous Yagyu clan, he travels the countryside with his young son in a tricked-out baby cart as an assassin and son for hire. Adapted from the manga by author Kazuo Koike, the films are both gorgeously contemplative and gory bloodbaths. Geoff Todd and Axel Kohagen join Mike to discuss the original manga, the television adaptations, the 1989 follow-up film, the 1992 reboot, and a handful of influences that the films have had on American popular culture."]

Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart to Hades  (Japan: Kenji Misumi, 1972: 89 mins)

Kohagen, Axel, Geoff Todd and Mike White. "The Lone Wolf and Cub Saga." The Projection Booth #303 (December 31, 2016) ["The Lone Wolf & Cub Films (also known as the Babycart Films, the Kozure Okami Films, the Shogun Assassin series and more) are six movies released from 1972-1974 starring Tomisaburo Wakayama as Ogami Itto, the Shogun's decapitator. After he's framed by the villainous Yagyu clan, he travels the countryside with his young son in a tricked-out baby cart as an assassin and son for hire. Adapted from the manga by author Kazuo Koike, the films are both gorgeously contemplative and gory bloodbaths. Geoff Todd and Axel Kohagen join Mike to discuss the original manga, the television adaptations, the 1989 follow-up film, the 1992 reboot, and a handful of influences that the films have had on American popular culture."]

Lone Wolf and Cub: Sword of Vengeance (Japan: Kenji Misumi, 1972: 83 mins)

Kohagen, Axel, Geoff Todd and Mike White. "The Lone Wolf and Cub Saga." The Projection Booth #303 (December 31, 2016) ["The Lone Wolf & Cub Films (also known as the Babycart Films, the Kozure Okami Films, the Shogun Assassin series and more) are six movies released from 1972-1974 starring Tomisaburo Wakayama as Ogami Itto, the Shogun's decapitator. After he's framed by the villainous Yagyu clan, he travels the countryside with his young son in a tricked-out baby cart as an assassin and son for hire. Adapted from the manga by author Kazuo Koike, the films are both gorgeously contemplative and gory bloodbaths. Geoff Todd and Axel Kohagen join Mike to discuss the original manga, the television adaptations, the 1989 follow-up film, the 1992 reboot, and a handful of influences that the films have had on American popular culture."]

Prime Cut (USA: Michael Ritchie, 1972: 88 mins)

Ashley, Cameron. "Prime Cut." The Projection Booth #110 (April 16, 2013)

State of Siege (France/Italy/West Germany: Costa-Gravas, 1972: 120 mins)




Sun Seekers (East Germany: Konrad Wolf, 1972: 116 mins) [It was banned by the government for 14 years]

Brockmann, Stephen. "Sonnensucher (1958) or Searching for the Socialist Sun." A Critical History of German Film Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2010: 234-245. [Professor has copy of the book]

Super Fly (USA: Gordon Parks Jr., 1972: 93 mins)

Guerrero, Ed. "The Spectacle of Black Violence as Cinema." Cinematic Sociology: Social Life in Film. Los Angeles, CA: Sage, 2013: 89-103. [In BCTC Library PN1995.9 S6 C543 2013]

Tout va Bien." (France/Italy: Jean-Luc Godard and Jean-Pierre Gorin, 1972: 95 mins)

Brody, Richard. "An Exile in Paradise." The New Yorker (November 20, 2000)

Un Flic (France/Italy: Jean-Pierre Melville, 1972: 98 mins)

Lane, Anthony. "Jean-Pierre Melville's Cinema of Resistance." The New Yorker (May 1, 2017) ["His films are illuminated by what he saw when France was ruled by oppression and ordinary people had to decide what, or whom, they would obey."]

The Valley (Obscured by Clouds) (France: Barbet Schroeder, 1072: 106 mins)

Bickerton, Emille. "La vallée/The Valley (Obscured by Clouds): extracts from the BFI booklet." Michael Gothard Archive (From Emilie Bickerton's “A Short History of Cahiers de Cinema": 2009)

1973

Amarcord (Italy/France: Federico Fellini, 1973: 123 mins)

Wertz, Peter. "Amarcord (1973)." Wertz of Wisdom (March 10, 2014)

The Baby (USA: Ted Post, 1973: 84 mins)

McDonagh, Maitland. "Parental Misguidance: Journeyman Ted Post Hit the Dysfuntional-Family Mother Lode with The Baby." Film Comment (November/December 2013) [Professor has a copy]

The Boss (Italy: Fernando di Leo, 1973: 100 mins)

Axmaker, Sean. "Fernando Di Leo, in the Shadow of THE GODFATHER." Keyframe (March 12, 2014) ["There is no loyalty, and really no family—there is just money and power and violence: Fernando Di Leo’s pulp fiction dismantlings."]

Breezy (USA: Clint Eastwood, 1973: 102 mins)

Kuersten, Erich. "An American Rohmer: Clint Eastwood's Breezy." Acidemic #6 (2010)

The Crazies (USA: George A. Romero, 1973: 104 mins)

Bateman, Conor. "Containing the Madness: George A. Romero's Crazies." Keyframe (Posted on Vimeo: November 2015)

Day for Night (France/Italy: Francois Truffaut, 1973: 115 mins)

Hurne, Mark and Aaron West. "Day for Night and François Truffaut 1968-1975." Criterion Close-Up #4 (August 30, 2015)

The Devil in Miss Jones (USA: Gerard Damiano, 1973: 67 mins)

Hudson, David. "Sex in the Movies." Green Cine (2005)

Don't Look Now (UK/Italy: Nicolas Roeg, 1973: 110 mins)

Kuersten, Erich. "CinemArchetype #5: The Human Sacrifice." Acidemic (February 28, 2012)

Enter the Dragon (Hong Kong/USA: Robert Clouse, 1973: 102 mins)

Hancock, James and Tony Stella. "The Legacy of the Dragon, Bruce Lee." Wrong Reel #245 (March 2017)

The Exorcist (USA: William Peter Blatty, 1973: 122 mins)

Dietz, Eileen. "The Exorcist." I Was There Too (March 4, 2015) ["Things get spooky this week as Eileen Dietz, the face of the demon Pazuzu aka Captain Howdy joins Matt to chat about being in the most famous horror movie of all time, The Exorcist. Eileen tells us the differences between the roles of Pazuzu & Captain Howdy, channeling wild animals for her improvised audition, her process with all the prosthetics, particularly with the puking apparatus, and her book Exorcising My Demons."]

Fantastic Planet (France/Czechoslavakia: René Laloux, 1973: 72 mins)

"Fantastic Planet." Masters of Cinema #5 (May 30, 2013)

The Friends of Eddie Coyle (USA: Peter Yates, 1973: 102 mins)

Flynn, Nick, Rick Marinick and Anna Mundow. "Boston Noir." Radio Open Source (December 8, 2014)

Ganja and Hess (USA: Bill Gunn, 1973: 110 mins)

Harvey, Dennis. "From GANJA AND HESS to Spike Lee’s DA SWEET BLOOD OF JESUS—and Back Again." Keyframe (February 9, 2015)

Lady Snowblood (Japan: Toshiya Fujita, 1973: 97 mins)

Hampton, Howard. "The Complete Lady Snowblood: Flowers of Carnage." Current (January 5, 2016)

Kinsella, Sharon. "Men Imagining a Girl Revolution." CMS Colloquium Podcast (December 11, 2006)

The Last Detail (USA: Hal Ashby, 1973: 104 mins)

Fitch, Alex, Dario Linares and Christina Newland. "The Last Detail." The Cinematologists #27 (June 1, 2016)

O'Brien, Adam. "Regional Horizons in The Last Detail." Movie #4 (2013)

The Legend of Paul and Paula (East Germany: Heiner Carow, 1973: 105 mins)

Brockmann, Stephen. "Die Legende von Paul und Paula (1973) or East Germany in the 70s." A Critical History of German Film Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2010: 258-273. [Professor has copy of the book]

Lone Wolf and Cub: Baby Cart in the Land of Demons (Japan: Kenji Misumi, 1973: 89 mins)

Kohagen, Axel, Geoff Todd and Mike White. "The Lone Wolf and Cub Saga." The Projection Booth #303 (December 31, 2016) ["The Lone Wolf & Cub Films (also known as the Babycart Films, the Kozure Okami Films, the Shogun Assassin series and more) are six movies released from 1972-1974 starring Tomisaburo Wakayama as Ogami Itto, the Shogun's decapitator. After he's framed by the villainous Yagyu clan, he travels the countryside with his young son in a tricked-out baby cart as an assassin and son for hire. Adapted from the manga by author Kazuo Koike, the films are both gorgeously contemplative and gory bloodbaths. Geoff Todd and Axel Kohagen join Mike to discuss the original manga, the television adaptations, the 1989 follow-up film, the 1992 reboot, and a handful of influences that the films have had on American popular culture."]

The Long Goodbye (USA: Robert Altman, 1973: 112 mins)

Adams, Sam, et al. "The Long Goodbye." Cinephiliacs #38 (May 11, 2014)

Love and Anarchy (Italy:  Lina Wertmüller, 1973: 120 mins)

Weston, Hillary. "Grotesque Poetry: A Conversation with Lina Wertmüller." Current (April 12, 2017)

Papillon (USA/France: Franklin J. Schaffner, 1973: 151 mins)

Cohen, Andrew. "40 Years Later, the Cruelty of Papillon is a Reality in U.S. Prisons: Two generations after the famous film about solitary confinement first appeared, it's still relevant to the deplorable treatment of inmates in America's prisons today." The Atlantic (December 16, 2013)

Requiem for a Vampire (France: Jean Rollin, 1973: 95 mins)

Deighan, Samm and Kat Ellinger. "Lust for a Female Vampire: The Evolution of Lesbian Vampires in Cinema, Part 2." Daughters of Darkness #2 (March 28, 2017) ["Kat and Samm continue their three-part discussion of lesbian vampire films, this time with a focus on European cult directors like Jess Franco, Jean Rollin, and Walerian Borowczyk. They begin their discussion with the career of the prolific Jess Franco, who produced a number of films with lesbian vampire themes, namely Vampyros Lesbos (1971). This starred his first muse, Soledad Miranda, as the mysterious Countess Carody, who sunbathes by day but thirsts for blood at night. Franco also adapted Bram Stoker’s novel with the relatively traditional Count Dracula (1970), but continued to explore his own perverse variations on vampire mythology in Dracula’s Daughter (1972) and the explicit Female Vampire (1975), with his longtime partner Lina Romay. Also explored is the work of French director Jean Rollin, known for his dreamlike, often surreal vampire films such as The Rape of the Vampire (1968), The Nude Vampire (1970), The Shiver of the Vampires (1971), and Requiem for a Vampire (1973). While these films infrequently use overt depictions of lesbianism, they are generally concerned with pairs or groups of female vampires banded together against the world. In films like Fascination (1979), about blood-drinking socialites, and The Living Dead Girl (1982), the tragic tale of a love that survives beyond death, Rollin expanded on his early themes. The episode concludes with a discussion of a few films that touch upon the legend of historical murderer and alleged blood-drinker Elizabeth Bathory. Most importantly is Belgian film Daughters of Darkness (1971), the podcast’s namesake, which follows a newly married couple who encounter an elegant and possibly ageless woman at a seaside hotel."]

Spigland, Ethan. "Requiem for a Dreamer: Jean Rollin." Acidemic #6 (2010)

Scream Blacula Scream (USA: Bob Kelljan, 1973: 96 mins)

Cross, Jon and Doug Tilley. "Scream Blacula Scream." The After Movie Diner #211 (February 8, 2017)

Serpico (USA: Sidney Lumet, 1973: 130 mins)

"Dig deeper into Sidney Lumet’s Serpico." Cinephilia and Beyond (2014)

Serpico, Frank. "The Police Are Still Out of Control: I should know." Politico (October 23, 2014)

Sleeper (USA: Woody Allen, 1973: 89 mins)

D'anna, Becky, James Hancock and Jacob Rivera. "Woody." Wrong Reel #205 (November 2016) ["Wide ranging discussion of his comedies prefaced by some clear analysis of his personal controversies"]

The Wicker Man (UK: Robin Hardy, 1973: 88 mins)

Farrow, Robert. "The Wicker Man: Games of truth, anthropology, and the death of ‘man’." Metaphilm (June 20, 2005)

Kuersten, Erich. "CinemArchetype #5: The Human Sacrifice." Acidemic (February 28, 2012)

World on a Wire (Germany: Werner Rainer Fassbinder, 1973: 205 mins)

Celluloid Liberation Front. "World on a Wire: Reality is Colder than Fiction." Senses of Cinema #56 (2010)

Tafoya, Scout. "The Post-Punk Cinema Manifesto." Keyframe (September 10, 2015)

Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars (UK: D.A. Pennebaker, 1973: 90 mins)

Pennebaker, D.A. "Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars." On Film (December 7, 2014)


1974

Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore (USA: Martin Scorsese, 1974: 112 mins)

Carvajal, Nelson and Max Winter. "Video Essay: Women in the Works of Martin Scorsese." Press Play (February 7, 2014)

Blazing Saddles (USA: Mel Brooks, 1974: 93 mins)

Hancock, James and Bill Scurry. "A Salute to the Great Mel Brooks." Wrong Reel #243 (March 2017)

The Cars That Ate Paris (Australia: Peter Weir, 1974: 91 mins)

Buckingham, Ben, et al. "The Cars That Ate Paris (1974)." The Projection Booth #311 (February 21, 2017) ["Peter Weir's The Cars That Ate Paris (1974) stars Terry Camilleri as Arthur Waldo, a meek man whose brother dies in a car accident outside of Paris, Australia -- a town whose economy relies on scavenging on the wrecks they create."]

Tafoya, Scout. "The Post-Punk Cinema Manifesto." Keyframe (September 10, 2015)

Cartesius (Italy/France: Roberto Rossellini, 1974: 150 mins)

Gallagher, Tag. "Eclipse Series 14: Rossellini’s History Films—Renaissance and Enlightenment." Current (December 25, 2008)

Celine and Julie Go Boating (France: Jacques Rivette: 1974: 193 mins)

Drain, Heather, et al. "Celine and Julie Go Boating." The Projection Booth #277 (June 28, 2016) ["Jacques Rivette's Celine and Julie Go Boating (1974) tells a story of friendship, adventure, and magic between two women (Juliet Berto and Dominique Labourier) in Paris."]

Chinatown (USA: Roman Polanski, 1974: 130 mins)

Kuersten, Erich. "The Primal Father (CinemArchetypes #8)." Acidemic (March 19, 2012)

Merrick, Amy. "Living In: Chinatown." Design Sponge (April 12, 2011)

The Conversation (USA: Francis Ford Coppola, 1974: 113 mins)

MacDowell, James. "John Cazale: Stepped Over." Alternate Takes (June 12, 2012)

Tafoya, Scout. "The Post-Punk Cinema Manifesto." Keyframe (September 10, 2015)

Edvard Munch (Sweden/Norway: Peter Watkins, 1974: 210 mins)

Greene, Robert. "Edvard Munch." The Cinephiliacs #24 (August 11, 2013)

The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser (West Germany: Werner Hauser, 1974: 110 mins)

Wölk, Ekkehard. "In Search of Bruno S.: A Berlin photographer finds, befriends and remembers the uniquely passionate person and puzzle that was Bruno Schleinstein." Keyframe (June 10, 2014)

Female Trouble (USA: John Waters, 1974: 89 mins)

Bradley, S.A. "Gag Reflex: The Cinema Crimes of John Waters." Hellbent for Horror #37 (April 7, 2017)

"John Waters." Close Up #5 (November 2014) ["On the occasion of our comprehensive John Waters retrospective in September, Eugene Hernandez sat down with the director at his New York apartment to talk about his career and influences. For this episode, we're happy to present that conversation as well as one between film critic J. Hoberman and the director after a screening of his 1974 film, 'Female Trouble.'"]

Going Places (France: Bertrand Blier, 1974: 117 mins)

Lévy, Kalyane. "Going Places." The Cinephiliacs #80 (May 29, 2016)

Je Tu Il Elle (France/Belgium: Chantal Ackerman, 1974: 86 mins)

Berrett, Trevor, David Blakeslee and Lady P. "Chantal Ackerman in the Seventies." #42 (April 29, 2016) ["Over the past four decades, Belgian director Chantal Akerman (Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles) has created one of cinema’s most distinctive bodies of work—formally daring, often autobiographical films about people and places, time and space. In this collection, we present the early films that put her on the map: intensely personal, modernist investigations of cities, history, family, and sexuality, made in the 1970s in the United States and Europe and strongly influenced by the New York experimental film scene. Bold and iconoclastic, these five films pushed boundaries in their day and continue to have a profound influence on filmmakers all over the world."]

Lacombe, Lucien (France/West Germany/Italy: Louis Malle, 1974: 138 mins)

Kael, Pauline. "Lacombe, Lucien" (1974) The Current (March 27, 2006)

Lady Snowblood 2: Love Song of Vengeance (Japan: Toshiya Fujita, 1974: 89 mins)

Hampton, Howard. "The Complete Lady Snowblood: Flowers of Carnage." Current (January 5, 2016)

Lenny (USA: Bob Fosse, 1974: 111 mins)

Anderson, Barry, et al. "The Bob Fosse Experience (1968 - 1983)." Illusion Travels by Streetcar #138 (February 1, 2017)







Little Malcolm and His Struggle Against the Eunuchs (UK: Stuart Cooper, 1974: 109 mins)

Sayed, Yusef. "Little Malcolm and His Big Brother." Keyframe (April 4, 2017)

Lone Wolf and Cub: White Heaven in Hell (Japan: Yoshiyuki Kuroda, 1974: 83 mins)

Kohagen, Axel, Geoff Todd and Mike White. "The Lone Wolf and Cub Saga." The Projection Booth #303 (December 31, 2016) ["The Lone Wolf & Cub Films (also known as the Babycart Films, the Kozure Okami Films, the Shogun Assassin series and more) are six movies released from 1972-1974 starring Tomisaburo Wakayama as Ogami Itto, the Shogun's decapitator. After he's framed by the villainous Yagyu clan, he travels the countryside with his young son in a tricked-out baby cart as an assassin and son for hire. Adapted from the manga by author Kazuo Koike, the films are both gorgeously contemplative and gory bloodbaths. Geoff Todd and Axel Kohagen join Mike to discuss the original manga, the television adaptations, the 1989 follow-up film, the 1992 reboot, and a handful of influences that the films have had on American popular culture."]

Phantom of the Paradise (USA: Brian De Palma, 1974: 92 mins)

Leatherwood, Roger. "The Phantom Archivist and The Phantom Archives: The Amateur Online Archive of Brian De Palma's Phantom of the Paradise (1974)." Bright Lights Film Journal #80 (May 2013)

The Swan Archives (Ongoing online archive for materials related to Phantom of the Paradise)

Shoot First, Die Later (Italy/France: Fernando Di Leo, 1974: 94 mins)

Axmaker, Sean. "Fernando Di Leo’s Anti-Mob Movies: Is There Such a Thing as a Happy Ending Built on the Corpses of the Losers?" Keyframe (March 13, 2014)

The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (USA: Joe Sargent, 1974: 104 mins)

Roizman, Owen and Rodney Taylor. "The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (1974)."  American Cinematographer Podcast #8 (No Date)

Thieves Like Us (USA: Robert Altman, 1974: 123 mins)

Lewis, Zach. "Thieves Like Us shows Robert Altman’s relationship with the American South." Sound on Sight (January 31, 2014)

Thunderbolt and Lightfoot (USA: Michael Cimino, 1974: 115 mins)

Brody, Richard. "Postscript: Michael Cimino, 1939-2016." The New Yorker (July 12, 2016)

The Yakuza (USA/Japan: Sydney Pollack, 1974: 123 mins)

Adelstein, Jake. "The Hardest Men In Town: Yakuza Chronicles of Sin, Sex and Violence (Japan Society Yakuza Film Festival Day One): The Yakuza." Japan Subculture Research Center (March 10, 2011)

Young Frankenstein (USA: Mel Brooks, 1974: 106 mins)

Hancock, James and Bill Scurry. "A Salute to the Great Mel Brooks." Wrong Reel #243 (March 2017)

Zardoz (Ireland/USA: John Boorman, 1974: 105 mins)

Landekic, Lola. "Pablo Ferro: A Career Retrospective, Part 2." Art of the Title (April 15, 2014)


1975


The Battle of Chile: Part 1 (Venezuela/France/Cuba: Patricio Guzmán, 1975: 191 mins)

McNeil, Jeremiah, Brian Risselada and Tom Sutpen. "Patricio Guzmán's Battle (1975-1997)." Illusion Travels by Streetcar (January 14, 2016)

Black Moon (France: Louis Malle, 1975: 100 mins)

Vincendeau, Ginette. "Black Moon: Louis in Wonderland." Criterion (June 28, 2011)

Bug (USA: Jeannot Szwarc, 1975: 99 mins)

Heumann, Joseph and Robin Murray. "“As beautiful as a butterfly”?: Monstrous cockroach nature and the horror film." Jump Cut #56 (Winter 2014/2015)

Death Race 2000 (USA: Paul Bartel, 1975: 80 mins)

Spiegelman, Adam. "Death Race: 2000." The Projection Booth (July 2, 2013) ["Celebrate your independence with this most American of our national sports, the Death Race! We're joined this week by Adam Spiegelman of the Proudly Resents and Dream Tweet podcasts to talk about this 1975 Paul Bartel film about a murderous cross-continental road race."]

Dersu Uzala (Soviet Union/Japan: Akira Kurosawa, 1975: 144 mins)

Hogg, Trevor. "Epic Dreamer: An Akira Kurosawa Profile." Flickering Myth (March 24, 2010)

Dog Day Afternoon (USA: Sidney Lumet, 1975: 125 mins)

Hart, David and Ben Zuk. "Dog Day Afternoon and Perspective Taking." Pop Culture Case Study (August 18, 2016)

MacDowell, James. "John Cazale: Stepped Over." Alternate Takes (June 12, 2012)

Escape to Witch Mountain (USA: John Hough, 1975: 97 mins)

Fitch, Alex and Lily Savy-Gorman. "John Hough on Escape Mountain." Reality Check (September 12, 2011)

Female Vampire (France/Belgium: Jess Franco, 1975: 72 mins)

Deighan, Samm and Kat Ellinger. "Lust for a Female Vampire: The Evolution of Lesbian Vampires in Cinema, Part 2." Daughters of Darkness #2 (March 28, 2017) ["Kat and Samm continue their three-part discussion of lesbian vampire films, this time with a focus on European cult directors like Jess Franco, Jean Rollin, and Walerian Borowczyk. They begin their discussion with the career of the prolific Jess Franco, who produced a number of films with lesbian vampire themes, namely Vampyros Lesbos (1971). This starred his first muse, Soledad Miranda, as the mysterious Countess Carody, who sunbathes by day but thirsts for blood at night. Franco also adapted Bram Stoker’s novel with the relatively traditional Count Dracula (1970), but continued to explore his own perverse variations on vampire mythology in Dracula’s Daughter (1972) and the explicit Female Vampire (1975), with his longtime partner Lina Romay. Also explored is the work of French director Jean Rollin, known for his dreamlike, often surreal vampire films such as The Rape of the Vampire (1968), The Nude Vampire (1970), The Shiver of the Vampires (1971), and Requiem for a Vampire (1973). While these films infrequently use overt depictions of lesbianism, they are generally concerned with pairs or groups of female vampires banded together against the world. In films like Fascination (1979), about blood-drinking socialites, and The Living Dead Girl (1982), the tragic tale of a love that survives beyond death, Rollin expanded on his early themes. The episode concludes with a discussion of a few films that touch upon the legend of historical murderer and alleged blood-drinker Elizabeth Bathory. Most importantly is Belgian film Daughters of Darkness (1971), the podcast’s namesake, which follows a newly married couple who encounter an elegant and possibly ageless woman at a seaside hotel."]

Fox and His Friends (West Germany: Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1975: 123 mins)

Browne, Colin. Fox and His Friends Senses of Cinema #59 (2011)

Hoberman, J. "The Single Antidote to Thoughts of Suicide: Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s American friends." Moving Image Source (June 28, 2012)

Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (Belgium/France: Chantal Ackerman, 1975: 201 mins)

Directors: Chantal Ackerman They Shoot Pictures Don't They (Ongoing Archive)

Jeanne Dielman, 23 Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (1975) Critics Round Up (Ongoing Archive)

Thornham, Sue. "‘A Hatred So Intense…’ We Need to Talk about Kevin, Postfeminism and Women’s Cinema." Sequence 2.1 (2013)

Kidnap Syndicate (Italy: Fernando Di Leo, 1975: 97 mins)

Axmaker, Sean. "Fernando Di Leo’s Anti-Mob Movies: Is There Such a Thing as a Happy Ending Built on the Corpses of the Losers?" Keyframe (March 13, 2014)

Love and Death (France/USA: Woody Allen, 1975: 85 mins)

D'anna, Becky, James Hancock and Jacob Rivera. "Woody." Wrong Reel #205 (November 2016) ["Wide ranging discussion of his comedies prefaced by some clear analysis of his personal controversies"]

Gordon, Keith. Love and Death Projection Booth (January 22, 2013)

Manila in the Claws of Light (Philippines: Lino Brocka, 1975: 125 mins)

"Manila in the Claws of Light." Critics Round Up (Ongoing Archive)

Monty Python and the Holy Grail (UK: Terry Gilliam and Terry Jones, 1975: 91 mins)

Gilbert, Jessica, et al. "Monty Python and the Holy Grail." Flixwise #30 (March 21, 2017)

Moses und Aron (Austria/France/West Germany/Italy: Danièle Huillet and Jean-Marie Straub, 1975: 107 mins)

McNeil, Jeremiah. "Jean-Marie Straub and Danièle Huillet - Moses und Aron." The Cinematic Mind of Jeremiah McNeil (June 10, 2014)

The Most Important Thing: Love (France/Italy/West Germany: Andrzej Zulawski, 1975: 109 mins)

Kwiatkowski, Al and Brad Strauss. "Andrzej Zulawski." Director's Club #126 (March 14, 2017)

Nashville (USA: Robert Altman, 1975: 159 mins)

Brook, David. "Blu Ray Review: Nashville." Row Three (June 5, 2014)

LoBrutto, Vincent. "Multiplot, Multicharacter Narrative: Nashville." Becoming Film Literate: The Art and Craft of Motion Pictures. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2005: 209-214. [BCTC Library: PN1994 L595 2005]

One Flew Over the Cuckoo Nest (USA: Milos Forman, 1975: 131 mins)

Buckler, Dana. "One Flew Over the Cuckoo Nest (1975)." How Is This Movie? (March 6, 2017)

Kuersten, Erich. "CinemArchetype #4: The Hanged Man." Acidemic  (February 12, 2012)

Overlord (UK: Stuart Cooper, 1975: 83 mins)

"Overlord's Archival War Footage." The Current (May 15, 2014)

The Rocky Horror Picture Show (USA: Jim Sharman, 1975: 100 mins)


Singer, Olivia. "Lessons We Can Learn From The Rocky Horror Picture Show." AnOther (October 30, 2015)

Rollerball (UK/USA: Norman Jewison, 1975: 125 mins)

Llinares, Dario and Neil Fox. "The Thing; The Fly; Rollerball; (Sci-Fi Special Part 1)." The Cinematologists #7 (June 4, 2015) ["The Fly, Demon Seed, The Thing and Rollerball are all discussed in the context of what the science fiction as a key cinema genre. Neil and Dario touch upon the tropes of hard v soft sic-fi, artificial intelligence, the fear of technology, metaphors of alien invasion and control of reproduction, along with many other of the fundamental elements of the sic-fi genre."]

Seven Beauties (Italy: Lina Wertmüller, 1975: 115 mins)

Weston, Hillary. "Grotesque Poetry: A Conversation with Lina Wertmüller." Current (April 12, 2017)

Shampoo (USA: Hal Ashby, 1975: 109 mins)

Hancock, James and Bill Teck. "Warren Beatty and the New Hollywood." Wrong Reel #265 (May 2017)

Smile (USA: Michael Ritchie, 1975: 113 mins)

Borden, Carol, et al. "Smile." The Projection Booth #267 (April 19, 2016) ["Get on your sash and listen to the discussion of Michael Ritchie's Smile, a send-up of beauty pageants and small-town America from 1975."]

Three Days of the Condor (USA: Sydney Pollack, 1975: 117 mins)

Thoret, Jean-Baptiste. "The Seventies Reloaded: (What does the cinema think about when it dreams of Baudrillard?)." Senses of Cinema #59 (2011)

1976

1900 (Italy/France/West Germany: Bernardo Bertolucci, 1976: 317 mins)

Kimmel, Michael. "Sitting in the Dark with Max: Classical Sociological Theory Through Film." Cinematic Sociology: Social Life in Film. Los Angeles, CA: Sage, 2013: 27-41. [In BCTC Library PN1995.9 S6 C543 2013]

Allegro non Troppo (Italy: Bruno Bozzetto, 1976: 75 mins)

Smalley, G. "Allegro non Troppo (1976)." 366 Weird Movies (August 28, 2013)

All the President's Men (USA: Alan J. Pakula, 1976: 138 mins)

"All The President's Men / Spotlight (Pt. 1)." and "All The President's Men / Spotlight (Pt. 2)." The Next Picture Show #1/2 (11/10/2015 and 11/12/2015)

Assault on Precinct 13 (USA: John Carpenter, 1976: 91 mins)

El Goro. "Assault on Precinct 13 (1976) and The Fog (1980)." Talk Without Rhythm #374 (June 18, 2017)

The Battle of Chile: Part 2 (Cuba/Chile/France: Patricio Guzmán, 1976: 88 mins)

McNeil, Jeremiah, Brian Risselada and Tom Sutpen. "Patricio Guzmán's Battle (1975-1997)." Illusion Travels by Streetcar (January 14, 2016)

Bruce's Deadly Fingers (Hong Kong: Joseph Velasco, 1976: 91 mins)

Lee, Kevin B. "Bruce Lee, Before and After the Dragon." Keyframe (July 18, 2013) ["From orphan child star to kung fu clones: on the 40th anniversary of Bruce Lee’s death, a look at the bizarre bookends of his legendary career."]

Burnt Offerings (USA/Italy: Dan Curtis, 1976: 116 mins)

Bradley, S.A. "Killed by Death." Hellbent for Horror #33 (February 27, 2017)

Charlie's Angels (ABC: Ivan Goff and Ben Roberts, 1976 - 1981)

Kuersten, Erich. "CinemArchetype #3: The Animus." Acidemic (February 1, 2012)

The Dragon Lives (Hong Kong: See-Yuen Ng, 1976: 90 mins)

Lee, Kevin B. "Bruce Lee, Before and After the Dragon." Keyframe (July 18, 2013) ["From orphan child star to kung fu clones: on the 40th anniversary of Bruce Lee’s death, a look at the bizarre bookends of his legendary career."]

Eaten Alive (USA: Tobe Hooper, 1976: 91 mins)

Cribbs, John, et al. "Geeking Out About Tobe Hooper." Wrong Reel #247 (March 2017)

The Front (USA: Martin Ritt, 1976: 95 mins)

Anthony, West and Daniel Tiger. "The Front." Cinema Gadfly #20 (June 2016)

Helter Skelter (USA: Tom Gries, 1976: 119 mins)

Kuersten, Erich. "The Primal Father (CinemArchetypes #8)." Acidemic (March 19, 2012)

The Killing of a Chinese Bookie (USA: John Cassavettes, 1976: 135 mins)

Palmer, Landon. "6 Filmmaking Tips From John Cassavettes." Film School Rejects (August 13, 2014)

The Last Tycoon (USA: Elia Kazan, 1976: 123 mins)

Bordwell, David. "How to tell a movie story: Mr. Stahr will see you now." Observations on Film Art (January 5, 2014)

The Man Who Fell to Earth (UK: Nicolas Roeg, 1976: 139 mins)

Doyle, Sean and Violet Lucca. "The Soundtracks of The Man Who Fell to Earth." (Posted on Vimeo: September 22, 2015)

Rosenbaum, Jonathan. "The Man Who Fell to Earth." Monthly Film Bulletin #507 (April 1976)

Massacre at Central High (USA: Rene Daalder, 1976: 87 mins)

Carradine, Robert, et al. "Massacre at Central High." The Projection Booth #285 (August 23, 2016) ["Rene Daalder's Massacre at Central High is the story of David (Derrel Maury), a new kid at school, who falls in with his old friend Mark (Andrew Stevens), where he finds that the so-called cool kids are running the school with an iron fist. Mark is seemingly the level-headed one amongst the quartet of bullies who intimidate everyone else. As Spoony says, the scene around here is a real bummer. The episode includes interviews with Derrel Maury, Robert Carradine, Andrew Stevens, Rex Sikes, and Jeffrey Winner. Doug Tilley and Heather Drain join Mike to discuss this fascinating take on Lord of the Flies."]

Mikey and Nicky (USA: Elaine May, 1976: 159 mins)

Ogundare, Tope. "Male Love Through Female Eyes - Five films about men, each directed by a woman. What do we learn?" Keyframe (March 24, 2016)

Mr. Klein (France/Italy: Joseph Losey, 1976: 123 mins)

Barker, Jennifer Lynne. The Aesthetics of Antifascist Film: Radical Projection. Routledge, 2013. [Get through interlibrary loan]

Network (USA: Sidney Lumet, 1976: 121 mins)

"Film Script: Network (1976)." Cutting on the Action (February 16, 2014)

Newland, Christina Marie. "Satirical Excess and Empty Vessels: Martin Scorsese's The King of Comedy." Bright Lights Film Journal #80 (May 2013)

The Omen (UK/USA: Richard Donner, 1976: 111 mins)

Brigden, Charles and James Hancock. "Exploring the Sound of Fear." Wrong Reel #252 (April 2017)

The Opening of Misty Beethoven (USA: Radley Metzger, 1976: 85 mins)

Hart, Veronica and Steven Morowitz. "The Opening of Misty Beethoven." The Projection Booth #111 (April 23, 2013) ["Radley Metzger's The Opening of Misty Beethoven, a re-telling of Pygmalion, was made at the height of porno chic. We're joined by Steven Morowitz of Distribpix, the company behind the new restoration of the film, and Veronica Hart, director of the musical version of Misty Beethoven."]

Hudson, David. "Sex in the Movies." Green Cine (2005)

The Outlaw Josey Wales (USA: Clint Eastwood, 1976: 135 mins)

Cheney, Matthew. "Outlaw: Josey Wales." Audiovisualcy (September 2012)

El Goro. "High Plains Drifter (1973) and The Outlaw Josey Wales (1976)." Talk Without Rhythm #366 (April 16, 2017)

Rulers of the City (Italy/West Germany: Fernando Di Leo, 1976: 85 mins)

Axmaker, Sean. "Fernando Di Leo’s Anti-Mob Movies: Is There Such a Thing as a Happy Ending Built on the Corpses of the Losers?" Keyframe (March 13, 2014)

The Shootist (USA: Don Siegel, 1976: 100 mins)

Freedman, Carl. "Post-Hetrosexuality: John Wayne and the Construction of American Masculinity." Film International 5.1 (2007) [Professor has a copy]

1977

3 Women (USA: Robert Altman, 1977: 124 mins)

Langill, Molly. "‘Mad Women’ in Robert Altman’s 3 Women and Images." Offscreen 18.8 (August 2014)

Smalley, G. "3 Women (1977)." 366 Weird Movies (February 19, 2014)

A Grin Without a Cat (France: Chris Marker, 1977: 240 mins)

Carvajal, Nelson. "Reflexive Memories: The Images of the Cine-Essay." (Posted on Vimeo: 2014)

Alambrista! (USA: Robert M. Young, 1977: 110 mins)

Devens, Arik and Anthony West. "Alambrista!" Cinema Gadfly (May 2016)

West, Aaron. Alambrista! Criterion Short Cuts #1 (October 13, 2015)

The American Friend (West Germany/France: Wim Wenders, 1977: 125 mins)

Martin, Adrian. "The Misleading Man: Dennis Hopper." Film International 5.1 (2007). [Professor has copy for students]

Annie Hall (USA: Woody Allen, 1977: 93 mins)

Daesler, Graham. "Cutter's Way: The Mysterious Art of Film Editing." Bright Lights Film Journals #78 (2012)

D'anna, Becky, James Hancock and Jacob Rivera. "Woody." Wrong Reel #205 (November 2016) ["Wide ranging discussion of his comedies prefaced by some clear analysis of his personal controversies"]

LoBrutto, Vincent. "Transformation of the American Comedy: Annie Hall." Becoming Film Literate: The Art and Craft of Motion Pictures. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2005: 7-13. [BCTC Library: PN1994 L595 2005]

The Ascent (Soviet Union: Larisa Sheptiko, 1977: 111 mins)

Blakeslee, David and Robert Nishimura. "Larisa Shepitko." The Eclipse Viewer #3 (September 24, 2012)

Risselada, Brian and Josh Ryan. "Larisa Sheptiko." Syndromes and Cinema #8 (March 29, 2014)

Audrey Rose (USA: Robert Wise, 1977: 113 mins)

Johnson, Steve. "Hollywood Daedalus: The Robert Wise of Audrey Rose." Bright Lights Film Journal (April 25, 2014)

Camouflage (Poland: Krzysztof Zanussi, 1977: 106 mins)

Bittencourt, Ella. "Martin Scorsese Presents: Masterpieces of Polish Cinema - Krzysztof Zanussi's Camouflage." Slant (February 1, 2014)

Damnation Alley (USA: Jack Smight, 1977: 91 mins)

Heumann, Joseph and Robin Murray. "“As beautiful as a butterfly”?: Monstrous cockroach nature and the horror film." Jump Cut #56 (Winter 2014/2015)

Death Game (USA: Peter Traynor, 1977: 91 mins)

Traynor, Dyan, et al. "Special Report: Death Game Redux." The Projection Booth (May 22, 2016)

Demon Seed (USA: Donald Cammell, 1977: 94 mins)

Ackerman, Bill, et al. "Demon Seed." The Projection Booth #257 (February 9, 2016)

Llinares, Dario and Neil Fox. "The Thing; The Fly; Rollerball; (Sci-Fi Special Part 1)." The Cinematologists #7 (June 4, 2015) ["The Fly, Demon Seed, The Thing and Rollerball are all discussed in the context of what the science fiction as a key cinema genre. Neil and Dario touch upon the tropes of hard v soft sic-fi, artificial intelligence, the fear of technology, metaphors of alien invasion and control of reproduction, along with many other of the fundamental elements of the sic-fi genre."]

Desperate Living (USA: John Waters, 1977: 90 mins)

Bradley, S.A. "Gag Reflex: The Cinema Crimes of John Waters." Hellbent for Horror #37 (April 7, 2017)

Fraternity Row (USA: Thomas J. Tobin, 1977: 100 mins)

Fetters, Ashley. "Pop Culture's War on Fraternities: Animal House and its many descendants didn’t glorify the Greek system—they mocked it." The Atlantic (February 28, 2014)

Handle With Care aka Citizen's Band (USA: Jonathan Demme, 1977: 98 mins)

Landekic, Lola. "Pablo Ferro: A Career Retrospective, Part 2." Art of the Title (April 15, 2014)

House (Japan: Nobuhiko Ôbayashi, 1977: 88 mins)

Rodriguez, Miguel, Rob St. Mary and Mike White. "House." The Projection Booth #279 (July 12, 2016) ["Nobuhiko Obayashi's House (1977) is a surrealistic ghost tale from Japan that explores the dangers of domesticity and loss."]

Martin (USA: George Romero, 1977: 95 mins)

Mayo, Mike and Edward G. Pettit. "Martin." The Projection Booth (April 9, 2013) ["George Romero's Martin is a remarkable vampire film made at the high point of Romero's career."]

News From Home (France/Belgium/West Germany: Chantal Ackerman, 1977: 85 mins)

Berrett, Trevor, David Blakeslee and Lady P. "Chantal Ackerman in the Seventies." #42 (April 29, 2016) ["Over the past four decades, Belgian director Chantal Akerman (Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles) has created one of cinema’s most distinctive bodies of work—formally daring, often autobiographical films about people and places, time and space. In this collection, we present the early films that put her on the map: intensely personal, modernist investigations of cities, history, family, and sexuality, made in the 1970s in the United States and Europe and strongly influenced by the New York experimental film scene. Bold and iconoclastic, these five films pushed boundaries in their day and continue to have a profound influence on filmmakers all over the world."]

Opening Night (USA: John Cassavetes, 1977: 144 mins)

Palmer, Landon. "6 Filmmaking Tips From John Cassavettes." Film School Rejects (August 13, 2014)

Our Hitler: A Film From Germany (West Germany/France/UK: Hans-Jürgen Syberberg, 1977: 442 mins)

Barker, Jennifer Lynne. The Aesthetics of Antifascist Film: Radical Projection. Routledge, 2013. [Get through interlibrary loan]

Pumping Iron (USA: George Butler and Robert Fiore, 1977: 85 mins)

Hancock, James and Orest Ludwig. "Talking Pumping Iron." Wrong Reel #211 (December 2016)

Rabid (Canada: David Cronenberg, 1977: 91 mins)

Hancock, James and Martin Kessler. "Canuxploitation." Flixwise (May 30, 2017)

Tafoya, Scout. "The Post-Punk Cinema Manifesto." Keyframe (September 10, 2015)

Sorcerer (USA: William Friedkin, 1977: 121 mins)

Tafoya, Scout. "The Unloved - Sorcerer." (Posted on Vimeo: 2014)

Stroszek (West Germany: Werner Herzog, 1977: 115 mins)

Wölk, Ekkehard. "In Search of Bruno S.: A Berlin photographer finds, befriends and remembers the uniquely passionate person and puzzle that was Bruno Schleinstein." Keyframe (June 10, 2014)

Suspiria (Italy: Dario Argento, 1977: 92 mins)

Brigden, Charles and James Hancock. "Exploring the Sound of Fear." Wrong Reel #252 (April 2017)

Koski, Genevieve, et al. "The Neon Demon/Suspiria, Pt. 1." The Next Picture Show #35 (July 12, 2016) ["Nicholas Winding Refn’s new THE NEON DEMON inspired us to look back at another tale of female rivalry that plays out in lurid colors and more than a little violence: Dario Argento’s classic 1977 horror movie SUSPIRIA. In this half, we explore the specific, lurid style in which Argento works, and consider how it functions as both cinema and horror. "]

---. "The Neon Demon/Suspiria, Pt. 2." The Next Picture Show #36 (July 14, 2016) ["We move our conversation of Dario Argento's 1977 film SUSPIRIA to Nicholas Winding Refn’s THE NEON DEMON, which works as a contemporary companion piece. In this half, we talk over the two films' respective uses of color, violence, and female competition."]


1978

Animal House (USA: John Landis, 1978: 109 mins)

Fetters, Ashley. "Pop Culture's War on Fraternities: Animal House and its many descendants didn’t glorify the Greek system—they mocked it." The Atlantic (February 28, 2014)

Big Wednesday (USA: John Milius, 1978: 129 mins)

Engle, John. "August and Everything After: A Half-Century of Surfing in Cinema." Bright Lights Film Journal #80 (May 2013)


Blue Collar (USA: Paul Schrader, 1978: 114 mins)

Hamilton, John R. "Paul Schrader." Senses of Cinema #56 (2010)

Coming Home (USA: Hal Ashby, 1978: 127 mins)

Kinder, Bill. "When Soldiers Come Home in the Movies: The post-war experience as told in tropes." Keyframe (November 11, 2015)

Dawn of the Dead (Italy/USA: George Romero, 1978: 127 mins)




The Demon (Japan: Yoshitarô Nomura, 1978: 110 mins)

Jacoby, Alexander. "Journeys into night: the police thrillers of Yoshitaro Nomura." Sight and Sound (March 27, 2014) ["Investigating post-war Japan with Shochiku’s career exponent of sleek, subtle genre cinema."]

Empire of Passion (Japan/France: Nagisa Ôshima, 1978: 105 mins)

Parkinson, David. "Oshima's Passions/" Movie Mail (February 27, 2013)

Fingers (USA: James Toback, 1978: 90 mins)

Toback, James. "Fingers." Pinewood Dialogues (June 23, 1996) ["Ever since his directorial debut Fingers, a film that, like its concert-pianist/hit-man hero, is torn between high culture and low life, James Toback has divided audiences. His champions admire his unique mixture of pulp and art, while some, like an audience member heard in this discussion, are appalled by his approach to violence and sexuality. Toback lives up to his reputation for storytelling and entertaining indiscretion as he talks about his career and about the mixed critical response to Fingers, which was remade in 2005 by French director Jacques Audiard as The Beat That My Heart Skipped."]

Germany in Autmn (West Germany: 11 Directors, 1978: 123 mins)

Brockmann, Stephen. "Deutschland im Herbst (1978) or Film and Politics." A Critical History of German Film Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2010: 342- 355. [Professor has copy of the book]

Girlfriends (USA: Claudia Weill, 1978: 86 mins)

Barton-Fumo, Margaret, Molly Haskell and Violet Lucca. "Women in New Hollywood." Film Comment Podcast (February 7, 2017) ["Road-tripping crises of masculinity soundtracked by classic rock, Harvey Keitel making up for his sins in the streets—a laundry list of 1970s New Hollywood highlights can tend to lack a nuanced female presence. But the ’70s also gave us Wanda, Puzzle of a Downfall Child, Girlfriends, A Woman Under the Influence, and even Five Easy Pieces, all of which explore female identity in the era of second-wave feminism. This episode of the Film Comment podcast spirals outwards from From Reverence to Rape author Molly Haskell’s essay on Mike Mills’s 20th Century Women and accompanying interview with Annette Bening, in the January/February issue, taking a closer look at depictions of women in New Hollywood. Some of these were “neo-women’s films,” dealing with disillusioned housewives fleeing the domestic sphere; others took on female friendship without turning a blind eye to its messiness, a line that runs through Thelma and Louise, Frances Ha, and Broad City."]

Grease (USA: Randal Kleiser, 1978: 110 mins)

Donnelly, Jamie and Barry Pearl. "Grease." I Was There Too #38 (June 8, 2016)

The Image of Bruce Lee (Hong Kong: Chuan Yang, 1978: 91 mins)

Lee, Kevin B. "Bruce Lee, Before and After the Dragon." Keyframe (July 18, 2013) ["From orphan child star to kung fu clones: on the 40th anniversary of Bruce Lee’s death, a look at the bizarre bookends of his legendary career."]

In a Year with 13 Moons (West Germany: Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1978: 124 mins)

Harkins-Cross, Rebecca. "Searching for the Self in Fassbinder’s In a Year with Thirteen Moons." Senses of Cinema #59 (2011)

Invasion of the Body Snatchers (USA: Philip Kaufman, 1978: 115 mins)



Jenkins, Jamie, Mark Mcgee and Mike White. "Invasion of the Body Snatchers." The Projection Booth #130 (September 3, 2013) ["From the deep reaches of space the pods arrive, ready to take over the human race, erasing our humanity and turning us into walking vegetables. We're looking at the four versions of Invasion of the Body Snatchers (and a few other films)."]

Killer of Sheep (USA: Charles Burnett, 1978: 83 mins)

"Charles Burnett, Pt. 1." Moving Image Source (January 7, 1995) ["The pioneering African-American director Charles Burnett was a film student at UCLA when he made Killer of Sheep (1977), a powerful independent film that combines blues-inspired lyricism and neo-realism in its drama of an inner-city slaughterhouse worker and his family. Killer of Sheep, now regarded as a landmark in American independent cinema, was part of a small group of films that became known as "The L.A. Rebellion." During a retrospective of his films at the Museum of the Moving Image, he introduced a screening of Killer of Sheep and then participated in a wide-ranging discussion moderated by culture critic Greg Tate."]


Koko: A Talking Gorilla (France: Barbet Schroeder, 1978: 85 mins)

Chiullan, Moises, et al. "Barbet Schroeder's Koko: A Talking Gorilla." Criterion Cast #129 (August 11, 2012) ["In 1977, acclaimed director Barbet Schroeder and cinematographer Nestor Almendros entered the universe of the world’s most famous primate to create the captivating documentary Koko: A Talking Gorilla. The film introduces us to Koko soon after she was brought from the San Francisco Zoo to Stanford University by Dr. Penny Patterson for a controversial experiment’”she would be taught the basics of human communication through American Sign Language. An entertaining, troubling, and still relevant documentary, Koko: A Talking Gorilla sheds light on the ongoing ethical and philosophical debates over the individual rights of animals and brings us face-to-face with an amazing gorilla caught in the middle."]

Les rendez-vous d'Anna (France/Belgium/West Germany: Chantal Ackerman, 1978: 120 mins)

Berrett, Trevor, David Blakeslee and Lady P. "Chantal Ackerman in the Seventies." #42 (April 29, 2016) ["Over the past four decades, Belgian director Chantal Akerman (Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles) has created one of cinema’s most distinctive bodies of work—formally daring, often autobiographical films about people and places, time and space. In this collection, we present the early films that put her on the map: intensely personal, modernist investigations of cities, history, family, and sexuality, made in the 1970s in the United States and Europe and strongly influenced by the New York experimental film scene. Bold and iconoclastic, these five films pushed boundaries in their day and continue to have a profound influence on filmmakers all over the world."]

Superman (USA/UK: Richard Donner, 1978: 143 mins)


Claverie, Ezra. "The Hollywood superhero as brand manager: An allegory of intellectual property." Jump Cut #57 (Fall 2016)


1979


1941 (USA: Steven Spielberg, 1979: 118 mins)

Reichert, Jeff. "This Ain't No Party, This Ain't No Disco, This Ain't No Foolin Around: 1941." Reverse Shot (June 16, 2013)

The Amityville Horror (USA: Stuart Rosenberg, 1979: 117 mins)


Buckler, Dana. "The Amityville Horror." How Is This Movie? (February 6, 2017)

The Battle of Chile: Part 3 (Chile/Cuba/Venezuela: Patricio Guzmán, 1979: 191 mins)

McNeil, Jeremiah, Brian Risselada and Tom Sutpen. "Patricio Guzmán's Battle (1975-1997)." Illusion Travels by Streetcar (January 14, 2016)

The Black Stallion (USA: Carroll Ballard, 1979: 118 mins)

Koski, Genevieve, et al. "Pete's Dragon / The Black Stallion Pt. 1." The Next Picture Show #41 (August 23, 2016)  ["The director of the new Disney live-action remake PETE’S DRAGON, David Lowery, recently cited as inspiration Carroll Ballard’s 1979 film THE BLACK STALLION, noting the older film’s careful merging of art and the mainstream. Following Lowery’s example, we look back this week at THE BLACK STALLION’s wondrous beauty and split structure, and try to ascertain what makes the film unique among films aimed at children."]

---. "Pete's Dragon / The Black Stallion, Pt. 2." The Next Picture Show #42 (August 25, 2016) ["Continuing the legacy of Carroll Ballard's THE BLACK STALLION, David Lowery's new Disney live-action remake of PETE'S DRAGON treats kids' films, kid audiences, and the emotional lives of children with respect and intelligence. In this half of the discussion, we talk over the two films' use of stories within stories, cinematography, child actors, and our relationship with animals and the natural world"]

The Brood (Canada: David Cronenberg, 1979: 92 mins)

Hancock, James and Martin Kessler. "Canuxploitation." Flixwise (May 30, 2017)

Caligula (Italy: Tinto Brass, 1979: 156 mins)

Hudson, David. "Sex in the Movies." Green Cine (2005)

Camera Buff (Poland: Krzysztof Kieslowski, 1979: 117 mins)

Cummings, Doug. "Great Directors: Krzysztof Kieslowski." Senses of Cinema #27 (2003)

Chilly Scenes of Winter (USA: Joan Micklin Silver, 1979: 92 mins)

Ackerman, Bill, et al. "Chilly Scenes of Winter (1979)." The Projection Booth #310 (February 14, 2017) ["In Joan Micklin Silver's Chilly Scenes of Winter (1979) John Heard plays Charles, a lovelorn man who pines for Laura (Mary Beth Hurt), who's taking a break from her relationship with Ox (Mark Metcalf). Produced by Metcalf, Amy Robinson, and Griffin Dunne, the film was initially released as Head Over Heels with a ridiculous advertising campaign that didn't capture the true spirit of the movie. Fortunately, the film was given another chance with a new ending and its proper title."]

Fascination (France: Jean Rollin, 1979: 80 mins)

Deighan, Samm and Kat Ellinger. "Lust for a Female Vampire: The Evolution of Lesbian Vampires in Cinema, Part 2." Daughters of Darkness #2 (March 28, 2017) ["Kat and Samm continue their three-part discussion of lesbian vampire films, this time with a focus on European cult directors like Jess Franco, Jean Rollin, and Walerian Borowczyk. They begin their discussion with the career of the prolific Jess Franco, who produced a number of films with lesbian vampire themes, namely Vampyros Lesbos (1971). This starred his first muse, Soledad Miranda, as the mysterious Countess Carody, who sunbathes by day but thirsts for blood at night. Franco also adapted Bram Stoker’s novel with the relatively traditional Count Dracula (1970), but continued to explore his own perverse variations on vampire mythology in Dracula’s Daughter (1972) and the explicit Female Vampire (1975), with his longtime partner Lina Romay. Also explored is the work of French director Jean Rollin, known for his dreamlike, often surreal vampire films such as The Rape of the Vampire (1968), The Nude Vampire (1970), The Shiver of the Vampires (1971), and Requiem for a Vampire (1973). While these films infrequently use overt depictions of lesbianism, they are generally concerned with pairs or groups of female vampires banded together against the world. In films like Fascination (1979), about blood-drinking socialites, and The Living Dead Girl (1982), the tragic tale of a love that survives beyond death, Rollin expanded on his early themes. The episode concludes with a discussion of a few films that touch upon the legend of historical murderer and alleged blood-drinker Elizabeth Bathory. Most importantly is Belgian film Daughters of Darkness (1971), the podcast’s namesake, which follows a newly married couple who encounter an elegant and possibly ageless woman at a seaside hotel."]

Hardcore (USA: Paul Schrader, 1979: 109 mins)

Hamilton, John R. "Paul Schrader." Senses of Cinema #56 (2010)

Life of Brian (UK: Terry Jones, 1979: 94 mins)

Marsh, James, et al. "Terry Jones' Monty Python's Life of Brian." CriterionCast #121 (April 5, 2012)

Mad Max (Australia: George Miller, 1979: 88 mins)

Mad Max Saga." Balder and Dash (May 11, 2015)

Manhattan (USA: Woody Allen, 1979: 96 mins)

D'anna, Becky, James Hancock and Jacob Rivera. "Woody." Wrong Reel #205 (November 2016) ["Wide ranging discussion of his comedies prefaced by some clear analysis of his personal controversies"]

Phantasm (USA: Don Coscarelli, 1979: 88 mins)

Bradley, S.A. "Killed by Death." Hellbent for Horror #33 (February 27, 2017)

Quintet (USA: Robert Altman, 1979: 118 mins)

Tafoya, Scout. "The Post-Punk Cinema Manifesto." Keyframe (September 10, 2015)

The Third Generation (West Germany: Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1979: 105 mins)

Hoberman, J. "The Single Antidote to Thoughts of Suicide: Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s American friends." Moving Image Source (June 28, 2012)

O'Donoghue, Darragh. "The Third Generation." Senses of Cinema #59 (2011)

The Tin Drum (West Germany/France/Poland/Yugoslavia: Volker Schlöndorff, 1979: 142 mins)

Brockmann, Stephen. "Die Blechtrommel (1979) or Coming to Terms with the Nazi Past." A Critical History of German Film Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2010: 370-381. [Professor has copy of the book]

Winter Kills (USA: William Richert, 1979: 97 mins)

Kiang, Jessica. "50th Anniversary: 8 JFK Assassination Films That Revisit History." The Playlist (November 20, 2013)

Woyzeck (West Germany: Werner Herzog, 1979: 82 mins)

Fritsche, Tom. "Woyzeck, When the Stars Align." Keyframe (May 1, 2014)

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