Saturday, December 6, 2014

Torture: Peace and Conflict Studies Archive

"20 key findings about CIA interrogations." The Washington Post (December 9, 2014) ["Almost 13 years after the CIA established secret prisons to hold and interrogate detainees, the Senate Intelligence Committee released a report on the CIA’s programs listing 20 key findings."]

"60 Words." Radiolab (April 18, 2014) ["This hour we pull apart one sentence, written in the hours after September 11th, 2001, that has led to the longest war in U.S. history. We examine how just 60 words of legal language have blurred the line between war and peace. In the hours after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, a lawyer sat down in front of a computer and started writing a legal justification for taking action against those responsible. The language that he drafted and that President George W. Bush signed into law - called the Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) - has at its heart one single sentence, 60 words long. Over the last decade, those 60 words have become the legal foundation for the "war on terror." In this collaboration with BuzzFeed, reporter Gregory Johnsen tells us the story of how this has come to be one of the most important, confusing, troubling sentences of the past 12 years. We go into the meetings that took place in the chaotic days just after 9/11, speak with Congresswoman Barbara Lee and former Congressman Ron Dellums about the vote on the AUMF. We hear from former White House and State Department lawyers John Bellinger & Harold Koh. We learn how this legal language unleashed Guantanamo, Navy Seal raids and drone strikes. And we speak with journalist Daniel Klaidman, legal expert Benjamin Wittes and Virginia Senator Tim Kaine about how these words came to be interpreted, and what they mean for the future of war and peace."]

Bauer, Shane. "A Hunger Strike Against Solitary Confinement: Shane Bauer on Inhuman Prisons from California to Iran." Democracy Now (July 12, 2013)

Beinart, Peter. "Torture Is Who We Are: A country, like a person, is what it does." The Atlantic (December 11, 2014)

Boykoff, Jules and Kristian Williams. "Police Power and the Suppression of Dissent." Writers Talking (February 24, 2009)

Brody, Reed. "'These Are Crimes': New Calls to Prosecute Bush Admin as Senate Report Reveals Brutal CIA Torture." Democracy Now (December 10, 2014)

Chomsky, Noam. "The Torture Memos: Torture has been routine practice from the early days of the Republic." Z Magazine (June 2009)

Conroy, John. "A Torture Story Without End." On the Media (July 9, 2010)

Crabapple, Molly. "George Bush's Paintings Aren't Funny: But they are fascinating." Politico (April 13, 2014)

Davidson, Amy. "The Torture Report: Inhumane Scenes From the C.I.A.’s Prisons." The New Yorker (December 9, 2014)

Falconer, Bruce. "The Torture Colony." The American Scholar (September 1, 2008) ["In a remote part of Chile, an evil German evangelist built a" dystopia "whose members helped the Pinochet regime perform its foulest deeds."]

Fisk, Robert. "On the CIA 'Torture Report': Once again language is distorted in order to hide US state wrongdoing." The Independent (December 14, 2014)

"Getting Away With Torture: The Bush Administration and Mistreatment of Detainees." Human Rights Watch (July 12, 2011)

Gosztola, Kevin. "Podcast: Chicago Police & Why the US Needs a Domestic Law Specifically Criminalizing Torture." The Dissenter (December 7, 2014)

Greenwald, Glenn. "Obama's justice department grants final immunity to Bush's CIA torturers." The Guardian (August 31, 2012)

---."Torture crimes officially, permanently shielded." Salon (July 1, 2011)

---. "U.S. Justice v. The World." Salon (February 18, 2011)

Greenwald, Glenn and Peter Maass. "Meet Alfreda Bikowsky, The Senior Officer at the Center of the CIA's Torture Scandals." The Intercept (December 19, 2014)

Hajjar, Lisa. "Omar Suleiman, the CIA’s Man in Cairo and Egypt’s Torturer-in-Chief." Democracy Now (February 11, 2011)

Horton, Scott. "The Torture Doctors." Harpers (November 4, 2013) [An expert panel concludes that the Pentagon and the CIA ordered physicians to violate the Hippocratic Oath.]

Jones, Andrew Jerell. "Prison Dispatches from the War on Terror: Ex-Cia Officer John Kiriakou Speaks." The Intercept (January 19, 2015)

Kebriaei, Pardiss. "Will Guantánamo Ever Close? U.S. Frees More Prisoners, But Dozens Remain Behind Bars." Democracy Now (December 24, 2014)

Kearns, Michael. "CIA Psychologist's Notes Reveal True Purpose Behind Bush's Torture Program." (March 22, 2011)

Kiriakou, John and Jesselyn Raddack. "Ex-CIA Agent, Whistleblower John Kiriakou Sentenced to Prison While Torturers He Exposed Walk Free." Democracy Now (January 30, 2013)

---. "Whistleblower John Kiriakou: For Embracing Torture, John Brennan a "Terrible Choice to Lead the CIA"." Democracy Now (January 30, 2013)

Leigh, David, James Ball, Ian Cobain and Jason Burke. "Guantánamo leaks lift lid on world's most controversial prison • Innocent people interrogated for years on slimmest pretexts • Children, elderly and mentally ill among those wrongfully held • 172 prisoners remain, some with no prospect of trial or release • Interactive guide to all 779 detainees." The Guardian (April 25, 2011)

Manningham-Buller, Eliza. "Securing Freedom." Reith Lectures (2011)

Mayer, Jane, et al. "24: Torture and Televised." Center on Law and Security (2010)

McCoy, Alfred and Steven Reisner. "After Duo Created CIA Torture Methods, Did World’s Largest Group of Psychologists Enable Abuses?" Democracy Now (December 16, 2014)

---. "'Psychological Torture is Enshrined in U.S. Law': Complicity in Abuses Began Long Before Bush." Democracy Now (December 16, 2014)

McGovern, Ray. "Excusing Torture, Again." Common Dreams (January 9, 2013)

"Mexico/US: Obama Should Press Peña Nieto on Justice." Human Rights Watch (January 5, 2015)

Murphy, Cullen. "God's Jury." Radio West (February 23, 2012)

Newman, Zak. "What's the Difference Between Force Feeding and Waterboarding?" Blog of Rights (March 24, 2014)

Onesto, Li. "California's Pelican Bay Prison Hunger Strike: "We Are Human Beings!" Global Research (July 18, 2011)

Open Society Justice Initiative. Globalizing Torture: CIA Secret Detention and Extraordinary Rendition. Open Society Foundations (February 2013)

Pierce, Charles P. "The CIA & NYPD: Perilous Insubordination in Our Democracy." The Politics Blog (December 22, 2014)

Pitter, Laura. "After Obama Shuns Probe, Bipartisan Panel Finds "Indisputable" Evidence U.S. Tortured Under Bush." Democracy Now (April 17, 2013)

Posner, Sarah. "Christians More Supportive of Torture Than Non-Religious Americans." Religion Dispatches (December 16, 2014)

Rahma, Mahmound Abu. "Under Siege: A Report from Gaza." Building Bridges (July 22, 2014) ["It is essential that U.S. citizens understand that this conflict should not continue to be viewed as a symmetrical one anymore and while they largely do not hear about it there are vicious violations of international law against Palestinians every day; including closures/blockades, settlement activities (population transfer on our land) displacement, killings, detention and torture."]

Ratner, Michael. "Ten Years after 9/11: War, Operation American Condor (Guantanamo) , Civil Liberties and Hope." Law and Disorder Radio (July 25, 2011)

Raymond, Nathaniel. "Weaponizing Health Workers: How Medical Professionals Were a Top Instrument in U.S. Torture Program." Democracy Now (December 23, 2014)

Risso, Cristina. "War Crimes of General Stanley McChrystal." Project Censored (2010)

Senate Torture Report Human Rights Watch (ongoing Archive)

Shaheed, Hakeem, et al. "Survivors of Solitary Confinement." Making Contact (June 3, 2009)

Soldz, Stephen. "Independent Investigation of APA Ties with Torturers Under Bush Administration." Law and Disorder Radio (November 24, 2014)

Taibbi, Matt. "'Zero Dark Thirty' Is bin Laden's Last Victory." Rolling Stone (Reposted on Reader Supported News: January 17, 2012)

Taxi to the Dark Side (USA: Alex Gibney, 2007: 106 mins)

Taylor, Flint. "Jon Burge, Former Chicago Police Commander Sentenced to 4 ½ Years." Law and Disorder Radio (January 31, 2011)

Taylor, Laurie. "The other side of the street: Laurie Taylor interviews Stan Cohen." New Humanist New Humanist 119.4 (July 2004)

"The Torture Architects [Infographic]." ACLU (December 8, 2014)

"US: Release Torture Report." Human Rights Watch (December 6, 2014)

Wilkerson, Lawrence. "Bush & Cheney Should Be Charged with War Crimes Says Col. Wilkerson, Former Aide to Colin Powell." Democracy Now (December 23, 2014)

---. "Ex-Bush Official: U.S. Tortured Prisoners to Produce False Intel that Built Case for Iraq War." Democracy Now (December 23, 2014)

Wohlstetter, Philip on Zero Dark Thirty: "How does a film think? Recall the famous experiment of Lev Kuleshov. Start with the shot of an actor’s face. Vary the shots adjacent to it: a coffin, a plate of soup, a seductive woman lying on a divan. The actor’s expression will be read, alternately, as sadness, hunger, or lust. For the audience, juxtaposition creates meaning. A film is an arrangement of moments, shorter or longer, but every narrative moment is brought into relief by a significant before-moment and a significant after-moment that frames it. Let’s look at the first torture sequence in Zero Dark Thirty to see how this meaning-effect works. Significant before-moment: the powerful opening sequence, dark screen, the terrified voice of a woman trapped in the World Trade Center on 9/11, realizing there’s no help coming, she’s going to die. Central narrative moment: a detainee is water-boarded in the next scene, forced to crawl in a dog collar, hung up naked by the arms, etc. After-moment: the face of Maya, wincing as she watches the torture. I’m cheating on this last. Obviously it’s a reaction shot within a scene, but in terms of meaning, it provides a bookend to the torture moment just as surely as the 9/11 sequence bookends it from the other side. To see the truth of this, imagine an opening with the before and after moments removed. We would be watching a brutal torture scene with no comment whatsoever—that is to say, we’d be in a neo-realist film that lets us observe and come to our own conclusions, that avoids (ideally) telling us what to feel. Instead, the torture moment is framed as a reaction to 9/11, an over-reaction maybe but understandable in context and perhaps in the end—we have to entertain this possibility—excusable. Now let’s look at the work of Maya’s reaction shot (remembering that it’s precisely the reaction shot, a way to locate the audience member in the movie by offering him/her a surrogate who reacts to events the way we would given the chance—it’s precisely this key device of classic Hollywood Film that Neo-Realism rejected because it lulled us so easily into unthinking). Maya winces. We would too, humanists and democrats that we are. But she stays in the room, gritting her teeth, going against her nature. Sometimes, the film whispers, you have to make hard choices, to take hard measures—a celluloid lesson in ‘dirty hands’ moral philosophy."





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