Thursday, September 15, 2016

The Stories We Tell: Ways of Seeing

[How and why we tell stories - praxis, mappings, analysis, critiques, deconstruction, revisions, transformations and censorship)

Abram, David, et al. "How To Think About Science, Parts 1 - 24." Ideas (January 2, 2012)

Adler, Renata, et al. "David Foster Wallace, FTW: Life in the Internet Age." Open Source (August 25, 2016)

Alwan, Wes, et al. "Alexis de Tocqueville on Democracy in America." The Partially Examined Life #152 (November 21, 2016) ["Democracy is in peril! So said Tocqueville in 1835 and 1840 when Democracy is America was published, and so would he likely say now. Democracy is always just one demagogue away from stripping us of our liberties, though certain structural and cultural features can make that more or less likely. Tocqueville liked our spirit of volunteerism, our civic activeness, our energy and inventiveness and competitiveness, and the pervasiveness of religion (at the time) in American culture. But he didn't like our groupthink, our tendencies toward materialism and caring only about our own small circle (what he called "individualism"), our lack of philosophical curiosity, and was in favor of a strong separation between church and state. He thought that people in a democracy value equality over freedom, and that in the absence of a strong spiritual countervailing force, we'd spend more energy pursuing material comfort and so would be more likely to allow a tyrant who promises this to us to take control. He also feared the rise of a new aristocracy out of the business world, with bosses becoming the new de facto lords. Then again, he also feared a race war and thought for sure that if the South tried to secede, the federal government would be too weak to prevent this, so there's that."]

Archives of Individual Films Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

Archives of the Films, By Decade, The Do Not Have an Individual Post Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

Arnade, Chris, Jim O'Grady and Kai Wright. "Race, Class, and the United States of Anxiety." On the Media (October 19, 2016)

Ayres, Jackson. "The X-Men and the Legacy of AIDS." The Los Angeles Review of Books (September 21, 2016)

Bailey, Jason. "The Trippiest Movies Ever Made." (Posted on Vimeo: 2012)

Beauvoir, Simon de. The Second Sex. Trans. Constance Borde. Vintage, 2011.

Becker, Snowden. "Police Body Cameras and Evidentiary Videos." The Cinephiliacs #83 (August 14, 2016) ["While this show has often staked its interest in the kinds of audiovisual materials we come to praise as art, there are many different types of moving image materials out there. None feels more pertinent to our moment today than the discussions around the introduction of police body-worn cameras alongside the amateur videos that display evidence of police brutality toward members of the African American community. To address these topics is often to approach them from one of politics, but a surrounding series of questions deals with many of the same questions that cinema-minded people might find familiar: what can we learn from analyzing how they were made? What elements are manipulation are present? How will these videos be stored? What access should the public have? What is the emotional affect of viewing them?"]

Berger, John. Ways of Seeing. (1972 BBC Series based on Berger's landmark book on art and perspective: four 30 minute episodes)

Blyth, Mark, David Kaiser and Vanessa Williamson. "The French Sensation: Income Inequality in the United States, 1910 - 2010." Open Source (May 1, 2014) ["The hottest book everybody is talking about, that no one has read and no can get their hands on, is a giant, data-packed tome on income inequality covering three hundred years of history by the French economist Thomas Piketty. Is there a reason he’s getting the rock star treatment? Is it the symptoms that resonate (our drift into oligarchy), or is it the cure (a progressive tax on wealth)?"]

Branch, Ashanti, et al. "Man Up." To the Best of Our Knowledge (January 8, 2017) ["Be strong, be tough, don’t cry – boys are bombarded with messages about being a man and the “male code” beginning around five or six years old. By high school, it’s second nature. But it can also be toxic. Because boys in America today aren’t doing so well. Compared to girls, they’re more likely to get diagnosed with a behavior disorder, drop out of school, binge drink, commit a violent crime, even kill themselves. So is that what it means to “man up”? "]

Brookes, Chris, et al. "Vestigial Tales, Pt. 1." Ideas (August 11, 2016) ["Analysing stories is usually territory claimed by writers, critics, and university scholars. But recently, evolutionary psychologists have begun to look at the human propensity for storytelling from a scientific perspective. Why are we humans such suckers for a good story? Literary critics find the answer in story structure, characters, and plotlines. The literary Darwinists find the answer in evolution. Documentary-maker Chris Brookes looks at the evolutionary origins of human storytelling."]

Buddicom, Jacintha, et al. "The Orwell Tapes, Pt. 1." Ideas (December 1, 2016) ["He was a brilliant, eccentric, complicated man; a colonial policeman, a critic and journalist, a dishwasher, a fighter in the Spanish civil war, a teacher and a shopkeeper - and one of the most influential writers of our time. His name was Eric Blair, better known as George Orwell. Who was the man who gave us 'big brother', 'thoughtcrime', 'doublethink', whose name looms so large in this era of mass surveillance? Steve Wadhams delves into recordings he made with the people who knew Orwell from his earliest days to his final moments."]

Callaghan, Ann, Annie Sprinkle and Beth Stephens. We're All a Little Ecosexual." Outside (October 5, 2016)

Carlin, Dan. "A Bodyguard of Lies." Common Sense #309 (September 9, 2016)  ["Secrecy, hacking, information leaks, whistle-blowers, foreign-operative propaganda pushers, disinformation, election tampering and the search for any truth in cyberspace occupy Dan's thoughts in this show."]

Carlsson, Chris and Susan Rosenthal. "Nowtopia and DIY Activism (Power and Powerlessness #1).  Unwelcome Guests #424 (August 17, 20008)  ["Susan Rosenthal, a physician and psychotherapist who reached the conclusion after decades of research, observation and activism that social power is necessary for human health. We'll also hear, in a similar vein, an interview with writer and DIY activist Chris Carlsson about his new book "Nowtopia"."]

Chen, Adrian. "The Propaganda About Russian Propaganda." The New Yorker (December 1, 2016)

Chomsky, Noam. Understanding Power: The Indispensable Noam Chomsky. The New Press, 2002.

"Close Encounters of the Third Kind and the Search for Meaning." Pop Culture Case Study (November 9, 2016)

Cohen, Jeffrey Jerome. "Monster Culture (Seven Theses)." Monster Theory: Reading Culture. University of Minnesota Press, 1996: 3 - 25.

Colman, Dan. "High School Teacher & Holocaust Expert Suspended for Drawing Parallels Between Trump & Hitler’s Rhetoric." Open Culture (November 13, 2016)

Costa, Cassie Da, et al. "Mondo, Mondo." Film Comment (July 26, 2016) ["This month, at Anthology Film Archives, FILM COMMENT contributor Nick Pinkerton has programmed a variety of shockumentary-style works ranging from the notorious Mondo Cane(an Academy Award nominee, for Original Song) to Thierry Zéno’s Des Morts. Many of these films aim to shock and titillate, sometimes purporting to document actual deaths, but they become politically and culturally revealing texts. None of this problematic entertainment holds a candle, however, to the real-life horror that has become a fixture of 21st-century visual culture: recordings showing police brutality—grim evidence of actual violence that is used in calls for justice. In a wide-ranging discussion that moves from the cinema of taboo to the complexities of recordings of police violence, FC Digital Editor Violet Lucca spoke with Pinkerton, critic and programmer Ashley Clark, and New Yorker video producer (and former FC intern) Cassie da Costa."]

Cromwell, David and David Edwards. "BBC Propaganda Watch: Tell-Tale Signs That Slip Through The Cracks." Media Lens (December 13, 2016)

Davis, Wade. "The Wayfinders: Why Ancient Knowledge Matters in the Modern World." (Posted on Vimeo: 2012)

Denniss, Richard and Julie Nelson. "It's the Economists, Stupid." Ideas (November 28, 2016) ["Interest rates. Unemployment. GDP. Markets. Austerity measures. Economists tell us what we, as societies, can and can't afford. But how do they decide? What values are at play? IDEAS producer Mary O'Connell speaks with two economists about how modern mantras on the economy limit our choices and shut down civic debate."]

Dickey, Colin. "Oliver and Sarah: The Story of the Winchesters." The Los Angeles Review of Books (September 28, 2015)

Dimaggio, Anthony. "Post-Fact Politics: Reviewing the History of Fake News and Propaganda." Counterpunch (December 6, 2016)

Edwards, David. "Fake News about 'Fake News': The Media Performance Pyramid." Media Lens (December 5, 2016)

---. "Filtering the Election." Media Lens (November 18, 2016)

Federici, Sylvia. Caliban and the Witch.  Autonomedia, 2004.

Forencich, Frank. "A New Warrior Activist." The Exuberant Animal (November 14, 2016)

Fox, Neil and Dario Linares. "Knowing Sounds: Podcasting as Academic Practice." The Cinematologists #32 (November 10, 2016) ["Knowing Sounds is an experimental podcast exploring the possibilities and outcomes of using the podcast medium as a creative practice underpinned by conceptual thought to produce and disseminate academic research. The podcast, which more specifically can be defined as an audio essay, is split into three sections. The first is an experimental collage of music, dialogue and sound effects from a selection of films which are interwoven with excerpts from audience members who attended The Cinematologists live screenings. It is designed to open up questions as to the potential for a sonic landscape to tap into the ‘cinematic imagination’ without the use of images. We thus play with aural engagement creating a space for the listener to actively negotiate the binary between the abstract emotions and intended rational meaning inferred through listening. The second section is a spoken analysis of the potential of podcasting as an academic form exploring how the mechanics sound production and dissemination in the digital age can challenge the powerful logocentric link between knowledge and writing. We also interrogate the structural formation that, paradoxically, has given rise to the ubiquity of podcasts in mainstream culture but has undermined its potential development. Furthermore, interweaving illustrative references, we analyse specific film podcasts and how they utilise a developing grammar of sonic writing to expand cultural discourse. The final section brings together other contributors to the journal of disrupted media practice who comment on their alternative methods of production and exhibition aimed at unsettling assumptions about the relationship between practice and theory."]

Fromm, Erich. The Anatomy of Human Destructiveness. Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1973.

---. The Sane Society. Routledge, 1991.

"From Tree to Shining Tree." Radiolab (July 30, 2016) ["A forest can feel like a place of great stillness and quiet. But if you dig a little deeper, there’s a hidden world beneath your feet as busy and complicated as a city at rush hour. In this story, a dog introduces us to a strange creature that burrows beneath forests, building an underground network where deals are made and lives are saved (and lost) in a complex web of friendships, rivalries, and business relations. It’s a network that scientists are only just beginning to untangle and map, and it’s not only turning our understanding of forests upside down, it’s leading some researchers to rethink what it means to be intelligent."]

Gaiman, Neil. "How Stories Last." The Long Now Foundation (June 9, 2015)

Gooley, Tristan. "The Lost Art of Natural Navigation." Radio West (November 23, 2016)  ["Nowadays, there are all kinds of devices to help us find our way through the world. But before all that stuff, before even cartography, humankind was navigating with nature as the guide. The adventurer Tristan Gooley is committed to recovering and teaching the lost arts natural navigation. Rocks, trees, grass, ducks, puddles, clouds, and the wind are all compass hands to him. Gooley joins us Wednesday to share what he’s learned about natural navigation and the joys of learning nature’s subtle signs. Tristan Gooley is the author of several books about natural navigation, including The Lost Art of Reading Nature’s Signs and his newest, How to Read Water. He is the only living person to have piloted small aircraft and sailed single-handedly across the Atlantic, and he’s a Fellow of the Royal Institute of Navigation and the Royal Geographical Society."]

Gottlieb, Anthony. "On Pierre Bayle." Philosophy Bites (December 2, 2016) ["Pierre Bayle was one of the most famous and respected philosophers of his day, but few today know much about him. Anthony Gottlieb, author of a recent book about the early Enlightenment, The Dream of Enlightenment, argues that Bayle should be better known, particularly for his views on religious toleration, scepticism, and the secular state."]

Greenwald, Glenn. "Anonymous Leaks to the WashPost About the CIA’s Russia Beliefs Are No Substitute for Evidence." The Intercept (December 10, 2016)

---. "Russia Hysteria Infects WashPost Again: False Story About Hacking U.S. Electric Grid." The Intercept (December 31, 2016)

---. "WashPost Is Richly Rewarded for False News About Russia Threat While Public Is Deceived." The Intercept (January 4, 2017)

Gross-Loh, Christine. "A Better Way to Teach History." The Atlantic (February 8, 2016) ["One professor is borrowing a method from Harvard Business School to engage students and inspire better decision-making skills."]

Hamilton, James T. "The Economics of Investigative Journalism." The Source (October 26, 2016)  ["In journalism, there are five W's: who, what, when, where and the most important - who is paying for this? How does the market transform muckraking information into a sustainable news product? What happens when editors and publishers don't see the economic value of the big scoop?"]

Hanlon, Aaron R. "Are Ph.D Students Irrational?" The Los Angeles Review of Books (August 24, 2016)

Historical Thinking Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

Hooper, Niels. "Black Against Empire and Banned Books Week." University of California Press Blog (September 26, 2016)

Hughes, William. "CMAs erase Beyoncé and Dixie Chicks from its social media accounts." A.V. Club (November 4, 2016)

"Introduction to the Podcast and Australia Cinema." The Last New Wave (July 30, 2016)

Isenberg, Nancy. "'White Trash' and Class in America." On the Media (June 22, 2016) ["As the media have watched the ascent of Donald Trump with disbelief-going-on-horror, pundits have returned frequently to the question of who exactly his supporters are. Terms like "angry" and "white working class" are mentioned frequently, but the National Review several months ago put it the most pointedly and viciously. In an article lambasting Trump supporters, Kevin Williamson characterized them as lazy drug addicts, compared them to animals, and even suggested that they deserved to die. Though he did not say it directly, the implication was clear: these people were white trash. We took that opportunity to take a deeper look at the idea of "white trash," with the help of writer and professor Nancy Isenberg, author of the forthcoming book, White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America. Isenberg described to Brooke how the notion of "white trash" has been around for a long time, belying the idea that America is a "classless" society. White Trash comes out this week, and we're re-running our conversation in honor of it."]

Johnson, Grace Sanders. "Why Haiti Needs New Narratives: An Interview With Gina Athena Ulysse." AAIHS (November 6, 2016) ["On October 4, 2016, Hurricane Matthew roared through Haiti’s southwest peninsula taking with it homes, centuries-old structures, and over 800 lives. In the storm’s wake, media outlets observed the undeniable damage of this specific natural event by projecting recycled, dehumanizing, and ahistorical narratives of Haiti to the world. InWhy Haiti Needs New Narratives: A Post-Quake Chronicle, Haitian-born feminist anthropologist Gina Athena Ulysse writes: “if there is one thing we know for certain, it is that without destruction, sensationalism, and violence, there is no Haiti story.” Ulysse’s trilingual collection of essays is a balm to wounds that are reopened each time the black republic is (mis)represented. The book is a timely reminder of the need to critically interrogate the historical implications of this current moment."]

Johnson, Kij. "Spinning Lovecraft Into a Feminist Dream Quest." Geek's Guide to the Galaxy (August 19, 2016)

Joseph, Peniel. "The Radical Democracy of the Movement for Black Lives." AAIHS (September 18, 2016) [Black Lives Matter has cast a strobe-light on contemporary myths of racial progress, arguing correctly that the criminal justice system represents a gateway to a panoramic system of racial and class and gender and sexuality oppression.”]

Kayyali, Dia. "Getting Started with Digital Security: Tips and Resources for Activists." Witness (November 2016)

Kilpatrick, Connor. "Everybody Hates Cornel West." Jacobin #23 (November 2016)

Koski, Genevieve and Tasha Robinson. "Elections, Entertainment and Empathy." The Next Picture Show (November 15, 2015)

Kovalik, Dan. "America in Vietnam: The Enduring Myth of the Noble Cause." Counterpunch (September 14, 2016)

Lanza, Robert. "Biocentrism: Rethinking Time, Space, Consciousness, and the Illusion of Death." Ideas (October 4, 2016) ["Dr. Lanza provides a compelling argument for consciousness as the basis for the universe, rather than consciousness simply being its by-product."]

Lear, Norman. "Just Another Version of You: The Life, Art and Activism of Legendary TV Producer Norman Lear." Democracy Now (October 25, 2016) ["Ninety-four-year-old legendary TV producer and longtime political activist Norman Lear has led a remarkable life. He helped revolutionize sitcom television with a string of hit shows including "All in the Family," "Sanford and Son," "The Jeffersons," "Good Times" and "Maude." In 1999, President Clinton awarded him the National Medal of Arts, saying, "Norman Lear has held up a mirror to American society and changed the way we look at it." Norman Lear is also a longtime activist, earning him a place on Richard Nixon’s enemies list and the scorn of the Christian right. His life, art and social activism is the subject of the new "American Masters" documentary, "Norman Lear: Just Another Version of You," which premieres tonight on PBS. We spoke with Norman Lear in studio last week."]

Lee, Kevin B. "Oliver Stone on How to Make History: Why authenticity is an unexpected through-line in this divisive director’s career." Keyframe (September 15, 2016)

Le Guin, Ursula K. "Speech at National Book Awards: 'Books aren't just commodities'." The Guardian (November 20, 2014)

"Logical Fallacies." Purdue Online Writing Lab (ND)

Mandelbaum, Randel F. "The 9 Best Reactions to the House Science Committee’s Breitbart Tweet." Scientific American (December 2, 2016)

Mattson, Stephen. "Social Justice is a Christian Tradition - Not a Liberal Agenda." Sojourners (August 11, 2015)

"Media Consolidation: The Illusion of Choice (Infographic)." Frugal Dad (November 22, 2011)

Minto, Robert. "A Smuggling Operation: John Berger's Theory of Art." Los Angeles Review of Books (January 2, 2017)

Monbiot, George. "Frightened by Donald Trump? You don’t know the half of it." The Guardian (November 30, 2016)

---. "Neoliberalism is Creating Loneliness. That's What's Wrenching Society Apart." The Guardian (October 12, 2016) ["Epidemics of mental illness are crushing the minds and bodies of millions. It’s time to ask where we are heading and why.]

Murphy, Sue. "Gender Inequality In Film, Here's How It Really Looks." Her (2013)

Nicholas, James Michael. "New Film Takes A Hard Look At Masculinity And Homophobia In America." Huffington Post (September 22, 2016)

Perlstein, Rick, et al. "Ghosts." On the Media (November 25, 2016) ["A special hour on memory, both historical and personal, and how what we remember shapes our world."]

Peabody, Fred. "All Governments Lie: Truth, Deception, and the Spirit of I.F. Stone." Film School (November 4, 2016) ["ALL GOVERNMENTS LIE: Truth, Deception, and the Spirit of I.F. Stone is a timely documentary for audiences who are increasingly seeking alternatives to news media owned by large corporations. News events and journalistic trailblazers stretching over many decades are linked together to tell this important story. This film will resonate with audiences in the US and worldwide, as news media ownership increasingly falls into the hands of a few giant corporations."]

Pinter, Harold. "Art, Truth and Politics." Nobel Prize in Literature 2005 (Acceptance Speech)

"Platform." The Movement for Black Lives (ND)

Prasad, Sonali, et al. "Obama's Dirty Secret: The Fossil Fuel Projects the US Littered Around the World." The Guardian (December 1, 2016)

Puschak, Evan. "Donald Trump: Magician-In-Chief." (Posted on Youtube: November 30, 2016)

Richardson, Vanessa and Carter Roy. "Socrates." Remarkable Lives, Tragic Deaths #22 (December 13, 2016) ["Socrates was a Greek philosopher who is credited as one of the founders of Western Philosophy. He was born circa 470 BC in Athens, Greece. We know of his life through the writings of his students, including Plato and Xenophon. His "Socratic method," laid the groundwork for Western systems of logic and philosophy. Socrates was sentenced to death by hemlock poisoning in 399 BC."]

Richter, Brent. "Culture warrior - How anthropology can save the world." North Shore News (September 10, 2016) [Wade Davis: "“The great revelation of anthropology was that the world that you’re born into is just one model of reality, the consequence of one set of choices your cultural lineage made, however successfully,” Davis said. “The other peoples of the world remind us there are other ways of thinking, other ways of being, other ways of orienting yourself in social, physical, even spiritual space.”]

Rickford, Russell. "Managed Democracy And The Illusion Of Politics." AAIHS (October 23, 2016)

Robinson, Ken. "Changing Education Paradigms." RSA Animate (2010)

Rosenberg, Marshall. "Nonviolent Communication." Against the Grain (December 6, 2016)

---. Speaking Peace: Connecting with Others Through Nonviolent Communication. (Audiobook posted Daily Motion: original publication March 20, 2015)

Rothman, Joshua. "How To Restore Your Faith in Democracy." The New Yorker (November 11, 2016) ["In dark times, it’s tempting to give up on politics. The philosopher Charles Taylor explains why we shouldn’t."]

Schoenbrun, Dan. "All Movies are Political Movies. We Need to Do Better." Filmmaker (November 9, 2016)

Spong, John Shelby. "Biblical Literalism." Radio West (September 2, 2016)  ["Retired Episcopal Bishop John Shelby Spong presents a provocative idea in his latest book. Reading the Bible literally, he says, is heresy. He bases his argument on a close reading of the Gospel of Matthew, which he argues was written by Jews for Jews. Spong says the gospel was not written as a literal account of Christ’s life, but rather as an interpretative portrait of God’s love. Spong joins us Friday to talk about biblical literalism and his uniquely progressive approach to Christianity. John Shelby Spong is the retired Episcopal Bishop of Newark. He has lectured at more than 500 universities, colleges, and theological seminaries around the world. He is the author 25 books, including his newest, Biblical Literalism: A Gentile Heresy.]

Stock, Kathleen. "On Fiction and the Emotions." Philosophy Bites (November 12, 2016)

The Stories We Tell: Quote File Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

Stravers, Jon, et al. "The Mississippi." To the Best of Our Knowledge (July 31, 2016)  ["The Mississippi River is an American icon. It's a body of water that’s been shaped as much by cultural processes as by environmental ones. From the state lines it draws to its role in literature and the arts, it’s a river that flows deep in the American psyche. This episode is about the boundaries and horizons of the Mississippi — its deep geologic past, its history as a route to freedom, and its meaning today. "]

Swanson, David. "The CIA Never Ever Lies." Counterpunch (December 12, 2016)

Taibbi, Matt. "The 'Washington Post' 'Blacklist' Story Is Shameful and Disgusting." Rolling Stone (November 29, 2016)

"Teaching The New Jim Crow." Teaching Tolerance (ND)

"Telling a Life." To the Best of Our Knowledge (October 23, 2016)  ["How do you tell the story of your life? Do you focus on meaning, accomplishment and hope - or on failure and loss? Psychologists say telling a good life story can make you happier. But do we also create an inauthentic version of ourselves if we turn everything into a narrative? We explore the idea of life stories, and hear why poet and singer Patti Smith chose to "write about nothing" when writing about her own life."]

Toobin, Jeffrey. "American Heiress." Radio West (September 8, 2016) ["Jeffrey Toobin, who’s written a book about the 1974 kidnapping of Patty Hearst. Hearst was 19 and heir to her family’s fortune when the “Symbionese Liberation Army” took her, and it soon seemed that she had adopted their incoherent, revolutionary cause. We’ll explore the controversy over Hearst’s involvement in their crimes, the atmosphere that gave birth to the SLA, and why Toobin says the story sheds light on a time when America was on the brink of a nervous breakdown."]

Tragos, Tracy Droz. "Abortion: Stories Women Tell." Film School (August 11, 2016)  ["In 1973 the U.S. Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade recognized the right of every woman in the United States to have an abortion. Since 2011, over half the states in the nation have significantly restricted access to abortions. In 2016, abortion remains one of the most divisive issues in America, especially in Missouri, where only one abortion clinic remains open, patients and their doctors must navigate a 72-hour waiting period, and each year sees more restrictions. Awarding-winning director and Missouri native Tracy Droz Tragos sheds new light on the contentious issue with a focus not on the debate, but rather on the women themselves – those struggling with unplanned pregnancies, the providers who show up at clinics to give medical care, as well as the activists on both sides of the issue hoping to sway decisions and lives. Tragos’ illuminating documentary Abortion: Stories Women Tell offers an intimate window into the lives of these women through their personal stories. Some are heartbreaking and tender some are bleak and frightening; some women, on both sides of the issue, find the choice easy to make due to their own circumstances and beliefs, while others simply inform us of the strength and capacity of women to overcome and persevere through complicated and unexpected circumstances. Director and producer Tracy Droz Tragos joins us for a conversation on one of the most contentious and intractable issues facing women and her beautifully balanced, heart wrenching and moving documentary."]

"Umberto Eco Makes a List of the 14 Common Features of Fascism." Open Culture (November 22, 2016)

Whitney, Mike. "The Corporate Media’s Assault on Free Speech: an Interview with Jeffrey St. Clair." Counterpunch (December 13, 2016)

Williams, Roger Ross. "Life, Animated." The Treatment (July 6, 2016) ["Roger Ross Williams has made a career of giving a voice to the voiceless. In his documentary Life, Animated, an adaptation of Ron Suskind’s book of the same name, he highlights Owen, an autistic child who identifies with and ultimately finds his own voice through animated Disney movies. Today, Roger discusses his long time struggle for representing the underdogs as well as what he learned, not only about raising a child with autism, but about the world of Disney."]

Yancy, George. "I Am a Dangerous Professor." The New York Times (November 30, 2016)

Yates, Michael. "Vietnam: The War That Won't Go Away." Counterpunch (December 5, 2016)

Young, Alden, "Braveheart for Black People: A Review of Birth of a Nation." AAIHS (October 25, 2016)

Young, Iris Marion. On Female Body Experience: Throwing Like a Girl and Other Essays. Oxford University Press, 2005.

Zinn, Howard. Audio version of Zinn reading his Introduction to A People's History of the United States: Highlights from the Twentieth Century  (Posted on Soundcloud: 2015) ["Since its original landmark publication in 1980, Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States has been chronicling American history from the bottom up, throwing out the official version of history taught in schools–with its emphasis on great men in high places–to focus on the street, the home, and the workplace."]

---. A People's History of the United States, 1492 - the Present. Harper-Perennial, 2015.

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