Thursday, October 11, 2018

Religion/Faith/Spirituality (Ongoing Archive)

"Access to healthcare is a spiritual issue, deeply rooted in a compassionate world view. Currently, in America, more than 40 million people are uninsured and millions more have insurance with such a high deductible that they cannot afford to use it. It is estimated that 22,000 Americans die prematurely every year because of a lack of access to healthcare. Why can't we cover everyone? Why do we spend twice as much as every other western democracy while getting less than France, Belgium, England, etc.? Why are politicians on both sides of the political spectrum seemingly in the pocket of healthcare insurance and pharmaceutical companies . . . and why are most churches silent about this travesty?"




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Abdurrahman, Sarah. "My Detainment Story or: How I learned to Stop Feeling Safe in My Own Country and Hate Border Agents." On the Media (September 20, 2013)

Ali, Wajahat, et al. "Fear, Inc.: The Roots of the Islamophobia Network in America." Center for American Progress (August 26, 2011)

Almendrala, Anna. "Crisis Pregnancy Centers Have Another Mission: Public School Sex Ed." Huffington Post (June 10, 2018) ["But they may have met their match in these Gen X parents, who are fighting back."]

Antler, Joyce. "The Forgotten Jewish Element of the Women's Liberation Movement." From the Square (March 27, 2018)

Baheyeldin, Khalid, et al. "The Book of Dune." Imaginary Worlds (July 12, 2017) ["Frank Herbert’s 1965 novel Dune and its sequels tackled a lot of big themes. The books are about ecology. They’re about journeys of self-realization through mind-altering substances. But religion is at the core of the series, since the main character Paul Atreides transforms from a teenage aristocrat into a messianic revolutionary leader of a nomadic desert tribe. And the real world religion that Frank Herbert borrows from the most is Islam. Khalid Baheyeldin, Salman Sayyid, and Sami Shah discuss why the book resonated deeply with them, despite the fact that Frank Herbert wasn’t Muslim. And Liel Liebowitz explains why the novel even spoke to him as an Israeli."]

Barber, William. "On Creating a Fusion Movement to Defeat Trump and Move Forward Together." Building Bridges (November 1, 2017) ["Dr. William Barber is the founder and president of Repairers of the Breach, an organization that seeks to build a progressive agenda rooted in a moral framework to counter the ultra-conservative constructs that try to dominate the public square. Rev. Barber one of the most influential, progressive religious figures in the country. Tens of thousands of men and women rose up in Chicago and cities from coast to coast to demanding that everyone in America have the right to organize and join a union and the Rev. William Barber said “I’m proud to stand with them, because their fight is central to the battle against poverty, racism, and inequality”. Earlier this year Rev. Barber announced an effort by faith and moral leaders to carry forward Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream of a Poor People’s Campaign, working across twenty-five states to alleviate the triad forces of poverty, militarism, and racism that Dr. King knew were poisoning our country then and still threaten us today."]

Barber, William. "Mississippi Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith Jokes About Hangings, But Her Policies Will Strangle the Poor." Democracy Now (November 26, 2018) ["Mississippi voters will head to the polls Tuesday in the state’s hotly contested runoff senate election, as incumbent Republican Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith faces off against Democrat Mike Espy. In a state that Donald Trump won by 20 percentage points two years ago, Espy is attempting to become Mississippi’s first African-American senator since Reconstruction. His opponent, incumbent Sen. Hyde-Smith, attended and graduated from an all-white segregationist high school and recently posed for photos with a Confederate Army cap and other Confederate artifacts. Earlier this month, a viral video showed Hyde-Smith praising a campaign supporter, saying, “If he invited me to a public hanging, I’d be on the front row.” Mississippi was once considered the lynching capital of the United States. We speak with Rev. Dr. William Barber, co-chair of the Poor People’s Campaign and president and senior lecturer of Repairers of the Breach. He recently traveled to Mississippi to get out the vote."]

Bass, Diana Butler. "Grateful." Princeton Theological Seminary Season #1 (2017) ["In this episode, Diana Butler Bass reimagines gratitude by examining two primary approaches: the self-help approach and the ethical approach. Acknowledging her inner ingrate, she critiques social systems of gratitude and turns to envision how we might become more grateful individuals and communities."]

Bayoumi, Moustafa and Glenn Greenwald. "Islamophobia and Surveillance in the Trump Era." We Are Many (September 26, 2017)

Being (American Public Media: "On Being is a spacious conversation — and an evolving media space — about the big questions at the center of human life, from the boldest new science of the human brain to the most ancient traditions of the human spirit. ... Krista [Tippett] envisioned a program that would draw out the intellectual and spiritual content of religion that should nourish our common life, but that is often obscured precisely when religion enters the news. Our sustained growth as a show has also been nurtured by a cultural shift that seeks conversation, shared life, and problem-solving within and across religious traditions and across categories of belief and non-belief. On Being has both responded and contributed to a growing acknowledgement that there are basic questions of meaning that pertain to the entire human experience. The particular dramas and dynamics of the 21st century — ecological, political, cultural, technological, and economic — are bringing this into relief.")

Beydoun, Khaled A. "What is Islamophobia?" American Islamophobia: Understanding the Roots and Rise of Fear. University of California Press, 2018: 1-22.

Billet, Alexander. "Pussy Riot for the 99 percent: on the growing campaign to free jailed Russian feminist punk rock collective Pussy Riot." Socialist Worker (July 30, 2012: reposted on Dialogic with relevant videos)




Blaine, Barbara and Pam Spees. "New Vatican Rules On Handling Priest Sexual Abuse Cases." Law and Disorder Radio (February 25, 2013)

Boggs, Grace Lee. "Becoming Detroit: Grace Lee Boggs on Reimagining Work, Food, and Community." On Being (July 18, 2013)

Bothwell, Cecil. "Billy Graham and the Gospel of Fear." Counterpunch (February 21, 2018)

Botton, Alain de. "Wants a Religion for Atheists: Introducing Atheism 2.0." Open Culture (January 26, 2012)

Boyle, Greg. "The Calling of Delight: Gangs, Service, Kinship." On Being (February 26, 2013)

Brown, Alex. "Black Excellence: Honoring Kwanza Through Science Fiction." TOR (December 5, 2017)

The Burning Times (Canada: Donna Read, 1990: 56 mins) ["This documentary takes an in-depth look at the witch hunts that swept Europe just a few hundred years ago. False accusations and trials led to massive torture and burnings at the stake and ultimately to the destruction of an organic way of life. The film questions whether the widespread violence against women and the neglect of our environment today can be traced back to those times. Part two of a series of three films on women and spirituality, which includes Goddess Remembered and Full Circle."]

Carrier, Scott. "Prisoner of Zion." Radio West (August 31, 2011)

Carroll, James, et al. "The Moral Crisis Faced by Christianity." Ideas (May 6, 2019) ["Christianity is the world's largest religion. One third of humanity identifies as Christian. Christian rituals and symbols have a special power even among non-believers in western countries — witness the outpouring of shock and sorrow over the fire that ravaged Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris. The moral codes of Christianity are intrinsic to western societies and form the foundation of the ethics and mores of hundreds of millions of people. And yet, some of Christianity's most daunting challenges have derived from the moral failures of its biggest institutions and the failures of Christians to follow their religion's core teachings. The object of worship may be divine, but the church and the worshippers are very human. Some of the crises facing contemporary Christianity are obvious, such as the ever-widening revelations of sexual abuse perpetrated by Catholic clergy and the role of bishops in covering it up. Some are less obvious, such as the embrace of anti-immigrant, xenophobic political movements in countries with large Christian majorities. On this month's edition of The Enright Files, conversations about the moral authority of the Church — and the struggles of Christians to live up to the principles of their faith — in the face of anxious, angry times and the Church's own crimes."]

Claiborne, Shane. A Monastic Revolution On Being (July 1, 2010)

Cockburn, Alexander and Jeffrey St. Clair. "The Preacher and Vietnam: When Billy Graham Urged Nixon to Kill One Million People." Counterpunch (September 27, 2017)

Crandall, Chris, Erin Kearns and Muniba Saleem. "The Weight of Our Words." Hidden Brain (April 13, 2018) ["... we look at the language we use around race and religion, and what it says about the culture we live in."]

Curley, Melissa Anne-Marie. "Dead Men Don’t Lie: Sacred Texts in Jim Jarmusch’s Dead Man and Ghost Dog: Way of the Samurai." Journal Of Religion & Film 12.2 (October 2008)

Davidson, Richard. "Investigating Healthy Minds." On Being (2012) ["Once upon a time we assumed the brain stops developing when we're young. Neuroscientist Richard Davidson helped overturn this idea by studying the brains of meditating Buddhist monks. Now he's working on conditions like ADHD and autism. He focuses not on fixing what is wrong, but on rewiring our minds with life-enriching behaviors." Introductory statement by Krista Tippett: "Transformation is Compatible with the Heart of Science."]

DebGod. "Pussy Riot Is On Trial Today." Skepchick (July 30, 2012)

Diaz, Junot. "Radical Hope is Our Best Weapon." On Being (September 14, 2017) ["'From the bottom will the genius come that makes our ability to live with each other possible. I believe that with all my heart.' These are the words of the Pulitzer Prize-winning Dominican-American writer Junot Díaz. His hope is fiercely reality-based, a product of centuries lodged in his body of African-Caribbean suffering, survival, and genius."]

Dunning, Brian. "Animal Predictors: Psychic, Sensitive, or Silly?" Skeptoid (April 29, 2014)

---. "New Age Energy: An examination of energy, as New Agers use the term." Skeptoid #1 (October 3, 2006)

Ea, Prince. "Choose Your Friends with Caution." (Video: July 7, 2018)

Eckholm, Erik. "An Iowa Stop in a Broad Effort to Revitalize the Religious Right." The New York Times (April 3, 2011)

Eisen, Arnold. "The Opposite of Good is Indifference." On Being (September 21, 2017) ["'In a free society, some are guilty, but all are responsible.' A mystic, a 20th-century religious intellectual, a social change agent, Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel marched alongside Martin Luther King, Jr., famously saying afterwards that he felt his legs were praying. Heschel’s poetic theological writings are still read and widely studied today. His faith was as much about 'radical amazement' as it was about certainty. And he embodied the passionate social engagement of the prophets, drawing on wisdom at once provocative and nourishing."]

Eisenbrandt, Matt. "'Assassination of a Saint': Salvadoran Archbishop Óscar Romero Is Canonized as Murder Remains Unsolved." Democracy Now (October 15, 2018) ["As Pope Francis names Salvadoran Archbishop Óscar Romero a saint, we continue our interview with Matt Eisenbrandt, a human rights lawyer and the author of “Assassination of a Saint: The Plot to Murder Óscar Romero and the Quest to Bring His Killers to Justice.” Romero was a champion for the poor and oppressed who was murdered by a U.S.-backed right-wing death squad in 1980 at the beginning of the brutal U.S.-backed military campaign in El Salvador. Eisenbrandt served on the trial team that brought the only court verdict ever reached for Romero’s murder."]

---. "Vatican Canonizes Salvadoran Archbishop Óscar Romero, Who Was Killed by a U.S.-Backed Death Squad." Democracy Now (October 15, 2018) ["Pope Francis has named Salvadoran Archbishop Óscar Romero a saint. Romero was a champion for the poor and oppressed who was murdered by a U.S.-backed right-wing death squad in 1980 at the beginning of the brutal U.S.-backed military campaign in El Salvador. Wearing the blood-stained rope belt that Romero wore when he was assassinated, Pope Francis praised Romero for disregarding his own life “to be close to the poor and to his people.” We speak with Matt Eisenbrandt, a human rights lawyer and the author of “Assassination of a Saint: The Plot to Murder Óscar Romero and the Quest to Bring His Killers to Justice.” Eisenbrandt served on the trial team that brought the only court verdict ever reached for Romero’s murder."]

Eisenstein, Charles. The Ascent of Humanity. (Panathea Productions, 2007)

Elba, Mariam. "How Islamophobia was Ingrained in America's Legal System Long Before the War on Terror." The Intercept (May 6, 2018)

Ewing, Heidi and Rachel Grady. "One of Us." Film School Radio (October 15, 2017) ["In their new documentary ONE OF US, acclaimed observational filmmakers Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady (JESUS CAMP, DETROPIA) take a deep and moving look at the lives of three individuals who have chosen to leave the hugely insular world of Hasidic Judaism.The film follows Etty, a mother of seven, as she decides to leave a violent marriage and divorce her husband; Ari, a teenager on the verge of manhood who is struggling with addiction and the effects of childhood abuse; and Luzer, an actor who, despite having found success in the secular world, still wrestles with his decision eight years earlier to leave the Hasidic community. Produced over three years, ONE OF US offers unique and intimate access to the lives of all three as they deal not only with questions of their beliefs but also with the consequences of leaving the only community they have ever known. With their trademark sensitivity and keen interest in the nature of faith, Ewing and Grady chronicle these journeys towards personal freedom that comes at a very high cost. Co-directors Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady join us for a conversation on their emotionally wrenching look into a world of dogmatism, ostracism and community."]

Friends Committee on National Legislation ["The Friends Committee on National Legislation (FCNL) fields the largest team of registered peace lobbyists in Washington, DC. Founded in 1943 by members of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers), FCNL staff and volunteers work with a nationwide network of tens of thousands of people from many different races, religions, and cultures to advocate social and economic justice, peace, and good government. FCNL is nonpartisan. FCNL is also the oldest registered ecumenical lobby in Washington, DC. The organization's legislative priorities and policies are set by a General Committee made up of some 220 Quakers from around the country. FCNL's multi-issue advocacy connects historic Quaker testimonies on peace, equality, simplicity, and truth with peace and social justice issues which the United States government is or should be addressing. We take the long term view of the world we seek, and the specific policies and legislative priorities we advocate. In our day-to-day lobbying work, we work to identify specific, practical steps individuals can take to persuade the federal government to advance our country toward our longer-term objectives."]

Gatto, John Taylor. "Bianca, You Animal, Shut Up!" Unwelcome Guests #631 (November 24, 2012)

---. "The Neglected Genius of American Spirituality" Unwelcome Guests #631 (November 24, 2012)

Gawande, Atul. "What Matters in the End?" On Being (October 26, 2017) ["What does a good day look like? This is the question that transformed Atul Gawande's practice of medicine. He's a citizen physician on the frontiers of human agency and meaning in light of what modern medicine makes possible. In his writing in The New Yorker, and in his book Being Mortal, he's opening a new conversation about what dying has to do with living."]

Gillepsie, Alex, Philip Horne and Sandra Jovchelovitch. "Literary Festival 2014: More Tales from the Two James(es)." The London School of Economics and Political Science (February 23, 2014) ["... readings from the work of William and Henry James to explore the links between psychology and fiction."]

Gleiser, Marcelo and Marilynne Robinson. "On the Mystery We Are." On Being (January 2, 2014)

Goddess Remembered (Canada: Donna Read, 1989: 55 mins) ["This documentary is a salute to 35,000 years of the goddess-worshipping religions of the ancient past. The film features Merlin Stone, Carol Christ, Luisah Teish and Jean Bolen, all of whom link the loss of goddess-centric societies with today's environmental crisis. This is the first part of a 3-part series that includes The Burning Times and Full Circle."]

Good, Dierdre and Karen King. "Mary Magdalene." Radio West (June 13, 2019) ["The Gospel of Mary, written in the name of Mary Magdalene, didn’t make it into the Biblical canon. The image of a powerful woman who was a spiritual leader among Christ’s disciples may have seemed risky to early members of the faith. But what the gospel taught was even more threatening. It challenged the basis of authority, the nature of sin, and it spoke of an inner journey to spirituality. The scholars Dierdre Good and Karen King join us talk about the facts and myths surrounding Mary Magdalene."]

Gottschalk, Peter. "American Heretics: Catholics, Jews, Muslims and the History of Religious Intolerance." After Words (November 22, 2013) ["Peter Gottschalk talks about his book, American Heretics: Catholics, Jews, Muslims and the History of Religious Intolerance, in which he argues that religious intolerance has been strong in America since the middle of the nineteenth century."]

Hall, Anna. "In the Shadow of 'Citizens United.'" Sojourners (January 27, 2014)

Hanh, Thich Nhat. The Miracle of Mindfulness: An Introduction to the Practice of Mindfulness. Trans. by Mobi Ho. Boston: Beacon Press, 1987.

Hecht, Jennifer Michael. "A History of Doubt." Being (May 3, 2007)

Hedges, Chris. "The Death of the Liberal Class." (Video of presentation at The Sanctuary for Independent Media: October 17, 2010)

Hedges, Chris and Hamza Yusuf. "Does God Love War? (A Dialog on Religion and the State)." Unwelcome Guests #306 (May 14, 2006)

Hennessey, Martha and Carmen Trotta.  "Kings Bay Plowshares: Meet Two of the Seven Activists Who Secretly Entered a Nuclear Submarine Base." Democracy Now (July 24, 2018) ["We look at the resistance against nuclear weapons here in the United States. On April 4, 2018—the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King’s assassination—seven Catholic Plowshares activists secretly entered Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay in Georgia, one of the largest nuclear submarine bases in the world. They were armed with just hammers, crime scene tape, baby bottles containing their own blood, and an indictment charging the U.S. government for crimes against peace. Their goal was to symbolically disarm the nuclear weapons at the base, which is home to at least six nuclear ballistic missile submarines. Each submarine carries 20 Trident thermonuclear weapons. The activists said they were following the prophet Isaiah’s command to “beat swords into plowshares.” It was the latest of 100 similar anti-nuclear Plowshares actions around the world beginning in 1980 in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. The first Plowshares action in 1980 was led by the late Daniel Berrigan and Phil Berrigan. Phil’s wife, Liz McAlister, was one of seven arrested at the April 4 action. McAlister and two other activists, Jesuit priest Stephen Kelly and Mark Colville, remain locked up in pretrial confinement in Brunswick, Georgia. Four others—Patrick O’Neill, Carmen Trotta, Martha Hennessy and Clare Grady—are under house arrest. All seven could face years in prison, if convicted. We speak with Martha Hennessy and Carmen Trotta. Hennessy is the granddaughter of Dorothy Day, the founder of the Catholic Worker movement. Carmen Trotta helps run the St. Joseph Catholic Worker House in New York."]

Herstik, Gabriela, Sophie Saint Thomas and Katie West. "Witchcraft, Ritual and Power." Breaking the Glass Slipper 2.22 (October 26, 2017)

Hiltermann, Joost. "Bahrain: A New Sectarian Conflict?" The New York Review of Books (May 8, 2012)

Holt-Giménez, Eric. "A Foodie's Guide to Capitalism." The Distillery (Season 1 - ND) ["People are not going hungry because of food scarcity but because of inequality. Introducing global food systems and how they impact farmers and consumers, Eric Holt-Giménez unpacks the intersections of class, gender, and race from the unique vantage point of the food economy."]

Honey, Michael and James Lawson. "He Gave His Life in the Labor Struggle: MLK’s Forgotten Radical Message for Economic Justice." Democracy Now (April 3, 2018) ["Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated 50 years ago this week while in Memphis, where he was supporting striking sanitation workers and building support for his Poor People’s Campaign. We look at King’s long history of fighting for economic justice, with the Rev. James Lawson and historian Michael Honey, author of the new book “To the Promised Land: Martin Luther King and the Fight for Economic Justice.”"]

"Identity Unmasked." Intelligence Report #167 (Summer 2019) ["Using fake names and fictional avatars, wannabe killers and hatemongers exude courage and commitment to their hateful causes. Until the world learns their real names. Until someone exposes their plans. In the anonymity provided by chat rooms, angry, prejudiced hate-filled people express lethal intentions and develop plots to harm or marginalize people because of their faith, ethnicity or sexual orientation. In this issue of the Intelligence Report, we unmask people who are brave in the dark and expose the impact of fighting hate with light."]

Isay, David. "The Everyday Art of Listening." On Being (April 17, 2014)

Jaschik, Scott. "Church and Tenure." Inside Higher Ed (May 5, 2014) ["The Kentucky Supreme Court has issued two unanimous decisions that strengthen the rights of tenured professors at religious institutions."]


Kahn, Emcee Ayesha, et al. "Combating Islamophobia in the Media." Needs No Introduction (April 11, 2016)

Kan, Elianna. "Buy High, Sell Cheap: An Interview with Alejandro Jodorowsky." The Paris Review (March 8, 2018)

King, Martin Luther, Jr. "Letter From a Birmingham Jail." African Studies Center of University of Pennsylvania (April 16, 1963)

Kingston, Maxine Hong. "Warrior of Peace." LARB (March 23, 2018) ["The great author reflects on a lifetime of writing, an unorthodox career, and her current work as a teacher and healer, which couldn’t be more relevant for our troubled times."]

Knust, Jennifer, Scott Lewis and Delphine Lourtau. "The First Stone: Jesus, The Accused, and Us." Ideas (April 18, 2019) ["Sean Foley asks: what does the story say to us about some of our deepest dilemmas?"]

Lamb, Robert and Joe McCormick. "Bicameralism, Part 1: The Voice of God." Stuff to Blow Your Mind (September 26, 2017) ["In 1976, psychologist Julian Jaynes presented the world with a stunning new take on the history of human consciousness. His book “The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind” hypothesized that ancient humans heard hallucinated voices in place of conscious thought, and presented archaeological, literary, historical and religious evidence to support this highly controversial view. Join Robert and Joe as they dissect bicameralism and discuss the evidence, the criticisms and more in this two-parter."]

---. "Bicameralism, Part 2: The Silent Pantheon." Stuff To Blow Your Mind (September 28, 2017)

Lane, Penny. "Hail Satan?" Radio West (May 10, 2019) [MB - I was interested in seeing this documentary and after listening to this discussion with the director Penny Lane I'm thinking it could be a great opportunity in my Peace Studies' courses for discussing the problems with authoritarian impulses and rigid/controlling dogmas of traditional/mainstream religions (or any dominant/controlling ideology/worldview).]

Lawson, James. "MLK’s Final Days: The Rev. James Lawson Remembers King’s Assassination & Support for Memphis Strike." Democracy Now (April 3, 2018) ["Fifty years ago today in Memphis, Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his final sermon, “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop.” Less than 24 hours later, King was assassinated at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee. He was just 39 years old. King was in Memphis to support striking sanitation workers. We speak to Rev. James Lawson, who invited King to come to Memphis to support the strike. At the time, Lawson was the pastor of Centenary Methodist Church in Memphis. King called Rev. Lawson “the leading theorist and strategist of nonviolence in the world.”']

"The Lectures of Joseph Campbell." Spotify (Playlist) ["Joseph John Campbell was an American mythologist who worked in comparative mythology and comparative religion. His work covers many aspects of the human experience."]

Lederach, John Paul. "The Art of Peace." On Being (July 8, 2010)

MacCulloch, Diarmaid. "Christianity - The First 3,000 Years." Radio West (November 29, 2010)

Macy, Joanna. "A Wild Love for the World." On Being (November 1, 2012)

Marcotte, Amanda. "Christian Intruders: New Law Will Force Women to Listen to Religious Lectures Before Getting an Abortion." AlterNet (March 23, 2011)

Marshall, Robert. "The Dark Legacy of Carlos Castaneda." Salon (April 4, 2007)

Marvin, Carolyn and David W. Ingle. Blood Sacrifice and the Nation: Totem Rituals and the American Flag. Cambridge University Press, 1999. [excerpt, first ten pages]

McElwee, Sean and Abigail Salvatore. "New Atheism’s big mistake: Debating creationists solves nothing: Fundamentalism isn't really about the Bible; it's about politics. So attacking religion doesn't fix the problem." Salon (February 1, 2014)

McFerrin, Bobby. "Catching Song." On Being (February 27, 2014)

Measom, Tyler. "Through the Lens: An Honest Liar." Radio West (April 28, 2014) [Documentary on The Amazing Randi]

Murphy, Ian. "Militant Atheist for Congress." Equal Time for Free Thought (April 2, 2011)

Nakahodo, Neil, Sarah Smith and Shelly Yang. "The Spirit of Fear." McClatchy (December 9, 2018) ["Hundreds of sex abuse allegations found in fundamental Baptist churches across U.S."]

Nesteroff, Kliph. "A History Of Christian Archie Comics." (June 7, 2010)

Newman, Ben. "The Canon Revisited." Imaginary Worlds (December 27, 2017) ["The Last Jedi may be the most controversial film in the Star Wars series. While the movie has been critically acclaimed, many Star Wars fans have argued that the film violated canon in a number of ways, especially how it depicted Luke Skywalker. This week, I revisit my 2014 episode “The Canon,” and I have a follow-up conversation with Rabbi Ben Newman about the state of the Star Wars canon. Until now, Ben and I had been on the same page about the new films, but like many fans, we found ourselves at odds when evaluating The Last Jedi."]

Ng, Edwin. "The (Zen) Buddhist Heart of I ♥ Huckabees." Journal of Religion and Film 14.1 (April 2010)

Nightingale, Andrea. "Epicurus and Epicureanism." Entitled Opinions (November 8, 2005)

Nisa, Eva. "'They Are Us': : New Zealand Mourns After Mosque Attacks Killed 50 Including Refugees & Immigrants." Democracy Now (March 19, 2019) ["Burials are beginning in New Zealand as the country mourns the loss of 50 Muslim worshipers gunned down in two mosques in Christchurch by a white supremacist Friday. It was the deadliest attack in New Zealand’s history. The worshipers killed in the Christchurch massacre came from around the world. Most of them were immigrants, or refugees who had come to New Zealand seeking safety. Six Pakistanis, four Jordanians, four Egyptians and at least three Bangladeshis are among the dead. The Palestinian Authority’s foreign ministry said that six of the victims were of Palestinian origin. We speak with Eva Nisa, a lecturer in religious studies at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand. Her recent article for Middle East Eye is titled “New Zealand has been a home to Muslims for centuries, and will remain so.”"]

Norton, Blake and Sophie Novack. "Texas Woman: I Was Forced to Consent to Bury Fetal Remains After Miscarriage in 'Horrific' Ordeal." Democracy Now (April 25, 2018) ["Last week, a U.S. appeals court declared unconstitutional an Indiana law signed by then-Governor, now Vice President, Mike Pence, that requires fetuses to be buried or cremated. This comes as Texas passed a law last year saying all fetal remains had to be buried or cremated, and also banned donation of that tissue for research purposes. In January, U.S. District Judge David Alan Ezra temporarily halted the fetal remains law, but Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton has vowed to continue fighting for it. For more, we speak with Blake Norton, who had a miscarriage in 2015 at the Seton Medical Center in Austin, Texas, and was forced to choose whether she would let the hospital bury the remains in a shared grave, or arrange for a “private burial” at her own expense. We’re also joined by Texas Observer reporter Sophie Novack, whose cover story about Blake Norton is headlined 'Indoctrinated: A Catholic hospital in Austin forces patients who miscarry to consent to fetal burials. For one woman, that made a painful loss even worse—and she worries it could soon become routine across Texas.'"]

Nuland, Sherwin. "The Biology of Spirit." On Being (March 6, 2014)["Dr. Sherwin Nuland died this week at the age of 83. He became well-known through his first book, How We Die, which won the National Book Award in 1994. But pondering death was for him a way of wondering at life. He reflected on the meaning of life by way of scrupulous and elegant detail about human physiology."]

Page, Blake. "Why I Don’t Want to Be a West Point Graduate." Huffington Post (December 3, 2012)

Parramore, Lynn Stuart. "God’s Racket: Why It’s High Time to Shut Down the Vatican Bank." AlterNet (February 25, 2013)

Paul, Gregory and Paul Zuckerman. "Why Do Americans Still Dislike Atheists." Washington Post (February 18, 2011)

Pinn, Anthony. "Humanism, Theology, and the Black Community." Mindscape (July 12, 2018) ["According to atheism, God does not exist. But religions have traditionally done much more than simply proclaim God’s existence: they have provided communities, promoted the arts, handed down moral guidance, and so on. Can atheism, or perhaps humanism, replicate these roles? Anthony Pinn grew up as a devout Methodist, but became a humanist when he felt that religion wasn’t really helping the communities that he cared about. Today he is a professor of religion who works to bring together atheism and the black community. We talk about humanism, identity politics, and the way forward."]

Pope John XXIII. "Pacem in Terris." Vatican: The Holy See (April 11, 1963)

Potter, Gary. "Fundamental Violence: Protestant Fundamentalism and Violent Crime." Uprooting Criminology (November 11, 2013)

The Power of Nightmares (United Kingdom: Adam Curtis, 2004)

Raven, Chantelle. "Empowering Yourself with Archetypes." Eliyah Tantric School (July 31, 2018)

Remen, Rachel Naomi. "Listening Generously: The Healing Stories of Rachel Naomi Remen." On Being (July 29, 2010)

Ricard, Matthieu. "Happiness as Human Flourishing." On Being (2017) ["A French-born Tibetan Buddhist monk and a central figure in the Dalai Lama's dialogue with scientists, Matthieu Ricard was dubbed "The Happiest Man in the World" after his brain was imaged. But he resists this label. In his writing and in his life, he explores happiness not as a pleasurable feeling but as a way of being that gives you the resources to deal with the ups and downs of life and that encompasses many emotional states, including sadness. We take in Matthieu Ricard's practical teachings for cultivating inner strength, joy, and direction." Krista Tippett's introduction "Compassion is a Skill to be Developed."]

Robbins, Tim. "Actor, Director Tim Robbins Takes Up Historic Vietnam War Protest in Production of The Trial of the Catonsville Nine." Democracy Now (August 27, 2009)

Rohr, Richard. "Growing Up Men." On Being (June 13, 2019) ["Men of all ages say Richard Rohr has given them a new way into spiritual depth and religious thought through his writing and retreats. This conversation with the Franciscan spiritual teacher delves into the expansive scope of his ideas: from male formation and what he calls “father hunger” to why contemplation is as magnetic to people now, including millennials, as it’s ever been. Richard Rohr is a Franciscan writer, teacher, and the founder of the Center for Action and Contemplation in Albuquerque, New Mexico. His many books include Falling UpwardDivine Dance, and most recently, The Universal Christ: How a Forgotten Reality Can Change Everything We See, Hope For, and Believe."]

Rucker, Erica. "Religion Creep." LEO Weekly (January 17, 2018)

Sanford, Matthew. "The Body's Grace." On Being (May 3, 2012)

Scahill, Jeremy and Samer Muscati. "On Blackwater Founder Erik Prince’s Private Army of “Christian Crusaders” in the UAE." Democracy Now (May 18, 2011)

Sharlet, Jeff. "Norwegian Shooting Suspect’s Views Echo Xenophobia of Right-Wing Extremists in U.S., Europe." Democracy Now (July 27, 2011)

Shaw, John. "The problem of the poor: faith, science and poverty in 19th century Britain." The National Archives Podcast Series (September 28, 2006)

Sheehan, Thomas. "On the Historical Jesus." Entitled Opinions (January 31, 2006)

Sloan, Scott. "Hands On Originals T-shirt company accused of discrimination." Lexington Herald-Leader (March 26, 2012)

"Survivor tries to make sense of aftermath of Norway attacks as trial continues." Public Radio International (May 7, 2012)

Sutton, Matthew, et al. "Apocalypse Now." Throughline (June 13, 2019) ["Evangelicals have played an important role in modern day American politics - from supporting President Trump to helping elect Jimmy Carter back in 1976. How and when did this religious group become so intertwined with today's political issues? In this episode, what it means to be an evangelical today and how it has changed over time."]

Tabachnick, Rachel. "The Evangelicals Engaged In Spiritual Warfare." Fresh Air (August 24, 2011)

Taub. Ben. "Guantanamo's Darkest Secret." The New Yorker  (April 15, 2019) ["The U.S. military prison’s leadership considered Mohamedou Salahi to be its highest-value detainee. But his guard suspected otherwise."]

Torre, Miguel de la. "Dumping Satan: It’s Time to Let Go." Religion Dispatches (October 26, 2011)

Vaneigem, Raoul. "The Resistance to Christianity. The Heresies at the Origins of the 18th Century." (1993: archived on the Anarchist Library)

Waldron, Travis. "Kentucky Church Unanimously Votes To Stop Signing Marriage Licenses Until Gay Marriage Is Legalized." Think Progress (April 21, 2011)

Walsh, David. "Why has The Passion of the Christ evoked such a popular response in America?" World Socialist Web Site (March 5, 2004)

Weatherford, Jack. "Genghis Khan's Surprising Legacy." Radio West (March 2, 2018) ["What’s the first thing that comes to mind when you hear the name Genghis Khan? Conquest, right? The terrifying Mongol hordes. But Genghis Khan’s legacy wasn’t built entirely on the battlefield. Motivated by fear and love, he was remarkably fair to the people he subjugated, going so far as to grant them religious freedom. Anthropologist Jack Weatherford has chronicled Genghis’s life and ideas, and he joins us to discuss their place in American political life and what they can teach us today."]

Wilder, Forrest. "Rick Perry's Army of God." Texas Observer (August 3, 2011)

Wilder, Forrest and Anthea Butler. "Rick Perry and Conservative Christian Politics." Radio West (August 19, 2011)

Williams, Duncan Ryuken. "Thus Have I Heard: An American Sutra." Tricycle (Spring 2019) ["With the outbreak of World War II, Japanese Americans were incarcerated by the thousands. Out of the crucible of the camps, a uniquely American Buddhism was born."]

Wilson, Lana. The Departure Film School (October 15, 2017) ["THE DEPARTURE, Lana Wilson’s (After Tiller) poetic and deeply moving look at a former punk-turned-Buddhist priest in Japan who has made a career out of helping suicidal people find reasons to live. One of the discoveries of the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival and featured at some of the world’s top documentary festivals, THE DEPARTURE follows a 44-year-old Tokyo native, Ittetsu Nemoto loves riding his motorcycle and dancing all night in clubs. But he’s also a Rinzai Zen priest, who lives with his wife, mother and baby son at a temple in the remote countryside of Gifu prefecture, Japan. There, over the last ten years, he has become famous for his work in combating suicide. But this work has come increasingly at the cost of his own family and health, as he refuses to draw lines between the people he counsels and himself. With astonishing access and artistry, Wilson’s camera captures Nemoto at a crossroads, when his growing self-destructive tendencies lead him to confront the same question his patients ask him: what makes life worth living? Director Lana Wilson (After Tiller) joins us for a conversation about death, love, priorities and family."]

Wolchover, Natalie. "A New Physics Theory of Life" Quanta (January 22, 2014)

Young, Lloyd. "Ramadan Begins." The Big Picture (August 3, 2011)

Zornberg, Avivah. "The Transformation of Pharaoh, Moses, and God." On Being (April 10, 2014) ["With a master of midrash as our guide, we walk through the Exodus story at the heart of Passover. It's not the simple narrative you've watched at the movies or learned in Sunday school. Neither Moses or Pharaoh, nor the oppressed Israelites or even God, are as they seem. As Avivah Zornberg reveals, Exodus is a cargo of hidden stories — telling the messy, strange, redemptive truth of us as we are, and life as it is."]




The genuine heart of sadness comes from feeling that your nonexistent heart is full. You would like to spill your heart's blood, give your heart to others. For the warrior, this experience of sad and tender heart is what gives birth to fearlessness. Conventionally, being fearless means that you are not afraid or that, if someone hits you, you will hit him back. However, we are not talking about street-fighter level of fearlessness. Real fearlessness is the product of tenderness. It comes from letting the world tickle your heart, your raw and beautiful heart. You are willing to open up, without resistance or shyness, and face the world. You are willing to share your heart with others. (32)
... But then, as you experience this sadness more and more, you realize that human beings should be tender and open. So you no longer need to feel shy or embarrassed about being gentle. In fact your softness begins to become passionate. You would like to extend yourself to others and communicate with them. When tenderness evolves in that direction, then you can truly appreciate the world around you. (36) -- Trungpa, Chögyam. Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior. Shambhala, 2007.










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