Monday, December 11, 2017

Racism/Apartheid/Caste (Ongoing Archive)






I am shocked that the NYTimes ran this powerful piece, but glad. This is a conversation we need to have. The author expresses what so many have been feeling - namely that peaceful protests have proven useless in recent years and so perhaps it makes sense to tell Baltimore officials to stop protecting the police or watch the city burn. I absolutely understand this sentiment and I've heard it expressed in various ways many times. There are a number of reasons why I disagree with violence as strategy, but in the short space here I'll just say one thing: As I see it, the reason nonviolent protests haven't yet achieved what many have hoped is NOT because the protests have been nonviolent, but rather because the problems and demands are often defined quite narrowly, and the tactics are typically reactive. There is a big difference between protesting when tragedies happen - marching in the streets with pastors asking for a few officers to be indicted - and building a nonviolent revolution against an unjust system. At its best, the Civil Rights Movement used nonviolence as a means of deliberately and strategically withdrawing all cooperation with a fundamentally unjust system. Think of the Montgomery Bus Boycott which nearly destroyed the bus system and rocked the city as a whole. Think of the Freedom Riders who refused to cooperate with or abide by segregation laws, throwing much of the South into an apoplectic state. And think of Dr. King, who at the end of his life said that the time had come to recognize the critical difference between a reform movement and a revolutionary movement, and urged advocates to work for a "radical restructuring of our society." At the time King was murdered, he was developing plans to bring a nonviolent army of poor people to Washington, DC and shut the nation's capitol down until Congress agreed to honor the basic human rights of all people to work for a living wage, live in decent housing, and obtain quality education. He wanted to paralyze the entire system of government and force a reckoning. In recent years much of that revolutionary spirit seems to have been lost or forgotten, particularly on MLK day when school children are taught the importance of nonviolence but not the importance of organized, nonviolent rebellion against injustice. Fortunately I see awakening today in so many young people - from Ferguson to Sanford to NYC to New Orleans to Chicago to Oakland to Baltimore and beyond - a fire and yearning for radical change that will not be satisfied by politics as usual or mere tinkering with the machine. We would not even be having this conversation today if it wasn't for the bold and courageous young people in Ferguson who inspired uprisings nationwide. Nonviolent protest forced a national conversation that politicians have tried to avoid for decades. We have more power than we realize, but we must use it strategically and proactively - not just sporadically and reactively. To this author I say: Don't burn Baltimore down. Shut it down. Let's use nonviolence as a strategic tool for revolutionary change, not as a polite response to predictable tragedy. -- Michelle Alexander on Facebook referring to the Baltimore Uprising and D. Watkins "In Baltimore, We Are All Freddie Gray": April 29, 2015)
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"2020AdWatch.com: A Searchable Database Tracking Xenophobic and Racist Political Ads." America's Voice (August 14, 2019)

Abdurrahman, Sarah. "My Detainment Story or: How I learned to Stop Feeling Safe in My Own Country and Hate Border Agents." On the Media (September 20, 2013)

Abu-Jamal, Mumia. "Mumia Abu Jamal Responds To Grand Jury Not Indicting Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson." Law and Disorder Radio (December 1, 2014)
---. "The United States Is Fast Becoming One of the Biggest Open-Air Prisons on Earth." Democracy Now (February 1, 2013)

Abu-Jamal, Mumia and Michael Parenti. "Created Unequal (Law, Money and Mumia Abu-Jamal)." Unwelcome Guests #6 (April 12, 2000)

Alexander, Michelle. "The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Jim Crow." We Are Many (September 12, 2012)

---. "Telling My Son About Ferguson." The New York Times (November 26, 2014)

Allen, Holly. "Scenes From Ferguson—and Beyond: Demonstrators react to a grand jury's decision not to indict Darren Wilson for killing Michael Brown." Slate (November 25, 2014)

Amend, Alex. "How the Myth of the 'Irish slaves' Became a Favorite Meme of Racists Online." Southern Poverty Law Center (April 19, 2016)

"AMERICA'S FRONT PAGES OF FERGUSON AFTERMATH (PHOTOS)." The Daily Beast (November 25, 2014)

"Anaheim: A Tale of Two Cities." Faultlines (December 12, 2012)

Ariel, Dan. "Labeling Antifa A Terrorist Group Latest Attempt To Usher In Fascism." It's Going Down (July 24, 2019) ["... addresses a recent attempt by a few GOP politicians to label “antifa” as a domestic terrorist organization." Michael Benton: Not only are republicans providing cover for the violent actions of white supremacist/nationalist groups, they are also trying to label as terrorists & criminalize the people, like those involved in the antifa movement (we have Mark Bray's history of the antifa movement in BCTC's library), that defend communities targeted for violence by white supremacist hate groups. Ask yourself how many people have been killed by people operating in antifa movement activities? None that I can find (which in the massive propaganda campaign seeking to demonize them you would think that there would be some claims along those lines) How many people have been killed by those espousing white supremacist/nationalist ideologies in the 21st Century? Let's make it easy, how many have they killed in the last week? Why is the former attacked/condemned/demonized by our politicians (including Democrats) and why are the violence/hatred of the latter protected/minimalized by Republicans. Amy Goodman yesterday reported: "Last month, FBI Director Christopher Wray told members of the Senate Judiciary Committee that crime driven by racism and white supremacy is on the rise compared to the previous year and that his agency recorded around a hundred arrests for domestic terrorism in the past nine months." Christopher Wray stated: "A majority of the domestic terrorism cases that we have investigated are motivated by some version of what you might call white supremacist violence." Also, former FBI supervisor Dave Gomez told The Washington Post, quote, “There’s some reluctance among agents to bring forth an investigation that targets what the president perceives as his base. It’s a no-win situation for the FBI agent or supervisor,” he said.]

Aronoff, Kate. "Understanding the Ferguson Riots as a Symptom of Violence." Truthout (August 20, 2014)

Arrowood, Emily. "Here Are The Conservative Pundits Branding Black Lives Matter A 'Hate Group'." Media Matters (September 2, 2015)

Baker-White, Emily. "Police Attitudes in Plain View." Criminal Injustice #106 (September 3, 2019) ["Many people make their social media posts public. Everyone can see them, like a signed billboard visible anywhere in the world. So, what should we think when we learn that *some* police officers, in some departments, have been posting racist messages or memes endorsing violence, visible to anyone on the Internet? "]

Baldwin, James, et al. "I Am Not Your Negro." Making Contact (November 8, 2017) ["Master filmmaker Raoul Peck envisions the book James Baldwin never finished, Remember This House. The result is a radical, up-to-the-minute examination of race in America, using Baldwin’s original words and flood of rich archival material. I Am Not Your Negro is a journey into black history that connects the past of the Civil Rights movement to the present of #BlackLivesMatter. It is a film that questions black representation in Hollywood and beyond. And, ultimately, by confronting the deeper connections between the lives and assassination of Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr., Baldwin and Peck have produced a work that challenges the very definition of what America stands for."]

Bandele, Asha and Patrisse Khan-Cullors. "'When They Call You a Terrorist': The Life of Black Lives Matter Co-Founder Patrisse Khan-Cullors." Democracy Now (January 16, 2018) ["We turn now to a powerful new book, released today, that tells the story of one woman as she fights back against the impacts of social and racial injustice in America on her family. That woman is Patrisse Khan-Cullors, co-founder of Black Lives Matter. The book, titled “When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir,” is both an account of survival, strength and resilience, and a call to action to change the culture that declares innocent black life expendable. Patrisse’s story follows her childhood in Los Angeles in the late 1990s and early 2000s, as her mother worked three jobs, struggling to earn a living wage. And it puts a human face on the way mass incarceration and the war on drugs hurt young black men, including her relatives and friends. Patrisse’s father was a victim of the drug war. He died at the age of 50. Her brother spent years in prison for nonviolent crimes stemming from his battles against mental illness. He was once even charged with terrorism after being involved in a car accident. The police would target Patrisse, too—raiding her house without just cause. In 2013, after George Zimmerman was acquitted for the killing of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, Patrisse co-founded Black Lives Matter along with Alicia Garza and Opal Tometi. The movement began online but soon spread across the country. "]

---. "Mississippi Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith Jokes About Hangings, But Her Policies Will Strangle the Poor." Democracy Now (November 26, 2018) ["Mississippi voters will head to the polls Tuesday in the state’s hotly contested runoff senate election, as incumbent Republican Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith faces off against Democrat Mike Espy. In a state that Donald Trump won by 20 percentage points two years ago, Espy is attempting to become Mississippi’s first African-American senator since Reconstruction. His opponent, incumbent Sen. Hyde-Smith, attended and graduated from an all-white segregationist high school and recently posed for photos with a Confederate Army cap and other Confederate artifacts. Earlier this month, a viral video showed Hyde-Smith praising a campaign supporter, saying, “If he invited me to a public hanging, I’d be on the front row.” Mississippi was once considered the lynching capital of the United States. We speak with Rev. Dr. William Barber, co-chair of the Poor People’s Campaign and president and senior lecturer of Repairers of the Breach. He recently traveled to Mississippi to get out the vote."]

---. "Racist Gerrymandering Created a GOP Stronghold in the South. We Must Fight Back." Democracy Now (June 10, 2019) ["Longtime civil rights leader Rev. Dr. William Barber joins us to respond to his conviction Thursday for trespassing during a 2017 protest against gerrymandering and attacks on healthcare at the North Carolina Legislature. Barber had refused to leave the General Assembly as ordered, after he organized a sit-in at the legislative building when Republican leaders refused to meet with him about concerns with voter ID requirements and redistricting plans that would weaken the power of the black vote. “We must start connecting systemic racism, most seen through systemic voter suppression and gerrymandering, poverty, the lack of healthcare, environmental devastation and the war economy,” says Barber, the former president of the North Carolina NAACP and a leader of the national Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival. This Wednesday he will join faith leaders and religious groups in Washington, D.C., for a march to the White House to protest the Trump administration’s attacks on the nation’s most vulnerable communities, and next week he hosts the three-day Poor People’s Campaign Moral Action Congress in Washington, D.C., that will draw hundreds of people from across the country for a presidential forum, where both Republican and Democratic candidates will speak."]

Barghouti, Mustafa. "Is There Room for Gandhi in Palestine?" Open Source (April 30, 2010)

Barnes, Mandela. "Ferguson, NYC, Milwaukee: Protests Erupt as Officer Cleared in Killing of Unarmed Dontre Hamilton." Democracy Now (December 24, 2014)

Barnes, Rhae Lynn. "Historian: Americans Must Face Violent History of Blackface Amid Virginia Gov. Racist Photo Scandal." Democracy Now (February 4, 2019) ["We discuss the history behind calls for Democratic Virginia Governor Ralph Northam to resign after a photo surfaced on his 1984 Eastern Virginia Medical School yearbook page showing a man wearing blackface posing next to a man wearing a Ku Klux Klan outfit. The yearbook also features an image of a white man in a wig, dress and black face. The photo’s caption reads, “'Baby Love,' who ever thought Diana Ross would make it to Medical School!” Another photo in the yearbook shows three men in blackface. We are joined by Rhae Lynn Barnes, assistant professor of American cultural history at Princeton University and author of the forthcoming book “Darkology: When the American Dream Wore Blackface.” Her new article for The Washington Post is headlined “The troubling history behind Ralph Northam’s blackface Klan photo.”" Also: Part 1 - "Virginia Legislative Black Caucus: Governor Northam Must Resign over Blackface Yearbook Photo." and Part 2: "As Virginia Governor Waffles on Blackface Yearbook Photo, NAACP Leader Calls His Apology “Invalid”."]

Barry, Dante and Alicia Garza. "'Not One More Darren Wilson, Not One More Mike Brown': National Protests Continue Ferguson Struggle." Democracy Now (December 1, 2014)

Bastone, William. "Was Key Grand Jury Witness in Michael Brown Case a Racist, Mentally Ill, Lying Ex-Felon?" Democracy Now (December 17, 2014)

Beckett, Lois. "How to Report on Gun Violence in America." On the Media (September 6, 2019) ["In August, 53 people died in mass shootings in the United States. Following the shootings in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio, Washington Post columnist Margaret Sullivan wrote, “When a mass shooting happens, even when it happens twice in a 24-hour period — even when the death toll soars into the dozens — we reflexively spring into action. We describe the horror of what happened, we profile the shooter, we tell about the victims’ lives, we get reaction from public officials. It’s difficult, gut-wrenching work for journalists on the scene. And then there’s the next one. And the next one. If journalism is supposed to be a positive force in society — and we know it can be — this is doing no good.” Lois Beckett is a senior reporter for The Guardian and has covered gun violence for seven years. She says that mainstream coverage of the issue is flawed because it's focused mainly on one type of tragedy. She explains to Brooke how better coverage would mean focusing on the root causes of gun violence."]

Beinart, Peter. "Trump Shut Programs to Counter Violent Extremism." The Atlantic (October 29, 2018)

Belew, Kathleen. "Understanding the White Power Movement." On the Media (March 22, 2019) ["When events like Christchurch happen, the elements may indeed be obvious: Guns. Sociopathy. Alienation. But the obvious is also reductive, and risks obscuring larger forces at play. The same goes with the vocabulary of race violence: White nationalist. White identity. Alt-right. White supremacy. White power. They’re used interchangeably, which further clouds the picture. Christchurch, says University of Chicago professor Kathleen Belew, is the latest manifestation not just of resentment and paranoia, or even radical racism, but of a clearly defined revolutionary movement: the white power movement. Belew is author of Bring the War Home: The White Power Movement and Paramilitary America, which describes the history of the white power movement that consolidated after the Vietnam War. She argues that if society is to wage an effective response to the white power threat, we need to work to understand it."]

Bell, Lawrence and Jesse Jackson. "National Guard Deployed as Baltimore Erupts After Years of Police Violence, Economic Neglect." Democracy Now (April 28, 2015)

Bell, Lawrence, Eddie Conway and Dominique Stevenson. "'Running While Black': Protests Swell over Death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore Police Custody." Democracy Now (April 23, 2015)


Berman, Taylor. "Obama: "There’s No Excuse for the Kind of Violence We Saw Yesterday"Gawker (April 28, 2015) [MB: His comments start at the one hour point and you should listen to point 6 were he discusses "structural racism" in America]

Berger, Dan, et al. "Prison Abolition Syllabus." Black Perspectives (November 20, 2016)

Berkow, Ira. "Stealing Home: A Tribute to Jackie Robinson." Ideas (April 15, 2019) ["The National Baseball Hall of Fame quotes trailblazer Jackie Robinson: "a life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives." Robinson's life had a huge impact, especially when he broke down the colour barrier in Major League Baseball and American society. His rookie season still stands as one of the most politically profound events in the history of organized sport."]

Beydoun, Khaled A. "What is Islamophobia?" American Islamophobia: Understanding the Roots and Rise of Fear. University of California Press, 2018: 1-22.

Biggers, Jeff. "Chained Ethnic Studies Students Take Over School Board in Tucson." Common Dreams (April 27, 2011)

"Black Lives Matter: Ferguson Erupts After Grand Jury Clears Officer in Michael Brown Killing."Democracy Now (November 25, 2014)

Blackmon, Douglas A. Slavery By Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black People in America from the Civil War to WWII. NY: Doubleday, 2008.

Blackmon, Douglas A., et al. "Mass Incarceration." Throughline (August 15, 2019) ["The United States imprisons more people than any other country in the world, and a disproportionate number of those prisoners are Black. What are the origins of the U.S. criminal justice system and how did racism shape it? From the creation of the first penitentiaries in the 1800s, to the "tough-on-crime" prosecutors of the 1990s, how America created a culture of mass incarceration."]

"Black Youth-Organized Millions March NYC Draws Tens of Thousands in Movement’s Biggest Protest Yet." Democracy Now (December 15, 2014)

Blanco, César and Fernando Garcia. "El Paso Shooting Probed as Domestic Terrorism After Anti-Immigrant Gunman Kills 22 People." Democracy Now (August 5, 2019) ["Over the span of 13 hours, the United States was shaken by two mass shootings. Saturday morning, a heavily armed gunman opened fire inside a crowded Walmart in El Paso, Texas, killing 22 people, including a number of Mexican nationals. Federal authorities are treating the El Paso attack as an act of domestic terrorism. The suspected gunman has been identified as a 21-year-old white man named Patrick Crusius, who lived 600 miles away in a suburb of Dallas. Shortly before the attack in El Paso, the gunman posted an anti-immigrant manifesto on the far-right message board 8chan. Some of the language in the manifesto echoed remarks by President Trump, including his use of the word “invasion” to describe immigrants crossing the southern border. We speak with César Blanco, Democratic member of the Texas House of Representatives, and Fernando Garcia, founding director of the Border Network for Human Rights in El Paso."]

Blumenthal, Max. "Max Blumenthal At “Against Israeli Apartheid” in New York City" Law and Disorder Radio (April 7, 2014)["... a speech by award winning journalist, and best selling author Max Blumenthal speaking at the event Against Israeli Apartheid along with Palestinian journalist Ali Abunimah. Max’s new book Goliath: Life and Loathing In Greater Israel shows the reader how the Netanyahu right wing government is actually moderate compared to most other institutions in Israel. His book takes a hard look at Israeli authoritarian politics from a cross section of interviews, from the homes of Palestinian activists to the political leaders behind the organized assault on democratic rights."]

Boehlert, Eric. "Obama, Race, And The Right-Wing Media's Heckler's Veto ." Media Matters (August 20, 2014)

Boguhn, Alexandrea and Coleman Lowndes. "Geraldo Rivera And The Victim-Blaming Of Black Teenagers." Media Matters (August 20, 2014)

Bond, Sarah E. "The Origins of White Supremacists’ Fear of Replacement." Hyperallergic (August 22, 2019)  ["Stoddard’s fear of non-white population growth was coupled with his recommendation of immigration restriction in the US. That recommendation was born out in the Johnson-Reed Act of 1924. It seems clear to me that today’s white supremacists not only advance the same fears of non-white population growth but have also found similar success in influencing nativist policy, as evidenced by Trump’s proposed Muslim ban and the caging of children at our southern border. Third, Stoddard proposed a separation of races at a national level i.e. white nations for white people. That argument is still advanced, even by Penn law professors!"]

Bosque, Melissa del. "Checkpoint Nation." Harper's (October 2018) ["Border agents are expanding their reach into the country's interior."]

Bourgeois, Robyn and Marion Buller. "Damning Canadian Inquiry Calls the Murder and Disappearance of Indigenous Women & Girls Genocide." Democracy Now (June 4, 2019) ["A chilling national inquiry has determined that the frequent and widespread disappearance and murder of indigenous girls and women in Canada is a genocide that the government itself is responsible for. The findings were announced by the Canadian National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls at a ceremony on Monday with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the families of victims. Many in the audience held red flowers to commemorate the dead. The national inquiry was convened after the body of 15-year-old Tina Fontaine from the Sagkeeng First Nation was found in the Red River in Winnipeg, Manitoba, in 2014. The report follows decades of anguish and anger as indigenous communities have called for greater attention to the epidemic of dead and missing indigenous women, girls and two-spirit, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, intersex and asexual people. Some 1,500 family members of victims and survivors gave testimony to the commission, painting a picture of violence, state-sanctioned neglect, and “pervasive racist and sexist stereotypes” that led nearly 1,200 indigenous women and girls to die or go missing between 1980 and 2012. Indigenous activists say this number could be a massive undercount, as many deaths go unreported and unnoticed. We speak with Marion Buller, chief commissioner of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, and Robyn Bourgeois, assistant professor in the Centre for Women’s and Gender Studies at Brock University."]

Branch, Taylor, Trey Ellis and Peter Kunhardt. "MLK’s Radical Final Years: Civil Rights Leader Was Isolated After Taking On Capitalism & Vietnam War." Democracy Now (January 25, 2018) ["Fifty years ago this April, Rev. Martin Luther King was assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee. He was just 39 years old. Today we look back at the last three years of King’s life, beginning after President Lyndon Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Despite passage of the monumental legislation, King set his eyes on new battles by launching a Poor People’s Campaign and campaigning to stop the Vietnam War. King’s decision to publicly oppose the war isolated him from many of his closest supporters. We feature clips from a new HBO documentary about King’s last years, titled “King in the Wilderness,” and speak with Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Taylor Branch, who wrote the “America in the King Years” trilogy and is featured in the film, as well as the film’s director Peter Kunhardt and writer Trey Ellis."]

Briquelet, Kate. "Bloods and Crips Team Up to Protest Baltimore’s Cops." The Daily Beast (April 27, 2015)

Bro, Susan and A.C. Thompson. "Mother of Heather Heyer, Killed 1 Year Ago: Everyone Needs to Pick Up the Baton & Stand Against Hate." Democracy Now (August 7, 2018) ["It has been nearly a year since anti-racist activist Heather Heyer died in Charlottesville, Virginia, when white supremacist James Alex Fields drove his Dodge Charger into a crowd of counter demonstrators. As white supremacists plan to mark the first anniversary of Charlottesville by holding another “Unite the Right” rally in Washington, D.C., we speak with Heyer’s mother Susan Bro about Heather Heyer’s legacy and what activists can do to combat racism."]

"The Brown Army Faction: A Disturbing New Dimension of Far-Right Terror." Der Spiegel (November 14, 2011)

Brown, Cecil. "Tarantino's "Django: Unchained": Hollywood’s Nigger Joke." Counterpunch (January 1, 2012)

Browne, Simone.  Dark Matters: On the Surveillance of Blackness. Duke University Press, 2015.

Buford, Talia, et al. "Home sweet home (Housing and Homelessness)." Best of the Left #1040 (September 2, 2016) ["Today we take a look at a couple of solutions to homelessness as well as some of the forces at play that effect how and where people live across the country."]

Burke, Tarana, et al. "Time’s Up: Meet Five of the Women Who Staged Protest at Golden Globes Against Gender Violence." Democracy Now (January 12, 2018) ["Across the United States, women are declaring “Time’s Up!” That’s the rallying cry that’s bringing together women—from Hollywood actresses to housekeepers—to demand gender and racial justice and a world free of sexual harassment and assault. The movement launched on Sunday night at the Golden Globe Awards, where the red carpet went dark, with many dressed in black to show their solidarity with the movement. And it wasn’t just actors and actresses. A number Hollywood stars brought social justice activists with them to the Golden Globes this year. Meryl Streep attended the ceremony with Ai-jen Poo, director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance. Shailene Woodley was accompanied by Suquamish Tribe member Calina Lawrence. Emma Stone brought tennis champ and LGBT advocate Billie Jean King. Susan Sarandon brought media justice activist Rosa Clemente. Amy Poehler’s guest was Saru Jayaraman, president of Restaurant Opportunities Center. Emma Watson brought Marai Larasi, executive director of the British anti-violence organization Imkaan. Laura Dern attended with Mónica Ramírez, president of the National Farmworker Women’s Alliance. And Michelle Williams walked the red carpet with #MeToo movement founder Tarana Burke."]

Butler, Anthea. "Police in Ferguson Keep Praying and Preying." Religion Dispatches (August 20, 2014)

Buttar, Shahid, Carl Dix and Michael McPhearson. "From Ferguson to Staten Island: Building Resistance to Police Terror." Building Bridges (August 27, 2014)

Buttu, Diana, Miko Peled and Raji Sourani. "Massacre in Gaza: Israeli Forces Open Fire on Palestinians, Killing 18, Wounding As Many As 1,700." Democracy Now (April 2, 2018) ["At least 18 Palestinians have died in Gaza after Israeli forces opened fire Friday on a protest near the Gaza Strip’s eastern border with Israel. As many as 1,700 Palestinians were wounded. The deaths and injuries came as 30,000 Gaza residents gathered near the wall, as part of a planned 6-week-long nonviolent protest against the blockade of Gaza and to demand the right of return for Palestinian refugees. The protests began on Friday, March 30, known as “Land Day,” marking the anniversary of the 1976 killing of six Palestinians protesting the Israeli confiscation of Arab land. Video posted online shows unarmed Palestinians being shot in the back while taking part in Friday’s protest. Another 49 Palestinians were injured by Israeli forces on Saturday. Israel’s actions have been condemned around the world, but Israel is rejecting calls to investigate the killings. At the United Nations, the U.S. blocked a move by the U.N. Security Council to open an investigation."]

Bynes, Patricia. "Armed w/ Military-Grade Weapons, Missouri Police Crack Down on Protests over Michael Brown Shooting." Democracy Now (August 14, 2014)

---. "Ferguson Unrest Continues as Police Accused of Incitement & Michael Brown’s Killer Remains Free." Democracy Now (September 29, 2014)

Bynes, Patricia and Renita Lamkin. "Facing National Outcry, Ferguson Police Drop Military-Grade Gear as Protests Continue Over Shooting." Democracy Now (August 15, 2014)

Cantú, Aaron Miguel. "The Whitest News You Know: The False Promise of a Press for Everybody." The Baffler #43 (February 2019)

Carrie, Shawn. "What everyone gets wrong about violence in Ferguson." The Daily Dot (November 18, 2014)

Casselman, Ben. "It’s Incredibly Rare For A Grand Jury To Do What Ferguson’s Just Did." Data Lab (November 24, 2014)

Charaborty, Ranjani. "The U.S. Medical System is Still Haunted by Slavery." Vox (December 7, 2017)

"Chicano Park, Barrio Logan, San Diego: The Takeover of Chicano Park." History of Chicano Park (ND) [also "Murals Appear in Chicano Park" and "The Restoration of the Murals in Chicano Park"]

Chappelle-Nadel, Maria. ""They Are All Michael Brown": State Senator Defends Protesters Seeking Justice in Police Shooting." Democracy Now (August 20, 2014)

Chomsky, Aviva, et al. "#DontLookAway from US Concentration Camps for Asylum Seekers." Best of the Left #1288 (July 10, 2019) ["Today we take a look at the history, legality, conditions and consequences of US concentrations camps erected to house asylum seekers fleeing from unspeakable violence only to land in the hands of Trump's intentionally torturous immigration detention system."]

Chomsky, Noam, et al. "Israeli right-wing politics has lead to some strange, fascist bedfellows." Best of the Left #1254 (March 5, 2019) ["Today we take a look at how the illiberalism of the Israeli government has alienated the vast majority of democratic nations and individuals who support human rights, leaving the country with some of the most far-right, fascist, white-supremacist, anti-Semitic people in the world as their only remaining allies."]

Christie, Gloria. "Ferguson Police Threaten, Restrain and Arrest Journalists, Is This A New Police State?" Addicting Info (August 19, 2014)

Churchwell, Sarah. "The Lehman Trilogy and Wall Street's Debt to Slavery." NYR Daily (June 11, 2019) 

Ciccariello-Maher, George and Mike King. "American Blowback: Cop-on-Cop Crime in LA." Counterpunch (February 8, 2013)

Clair, Jeffrey St. and Alexander Cockburn. "Operation Paperclip: NAZI Science Heads West." Counterpunch (December 8, 2017)

Clarke, Cheryl, et al. "The Fire This Time." Public Seminar (April 3, 2019) ["Violence against African American people creates pain and outrage, but policy makers offer us few solutions. In this episode, we ask: how can the fight for racial justice be accelerated, even as racism remains as persistent today as it was before the modern Civil Rights movement? In the spirit of writer James Baldwin’s vehement call for black liberation, this Exiles on 12th Street episode, the second in our series, gives voice to local activists and artists fighting for change. Come think with us about civil rights with our guests: civil rights lawyer Douglas White, community organizer Cidra Sebastien, the Reverend Marcus McCullough, and poet Cheryl Clarke. The episode is presented by your host, historian Claire Potter, executive editor of Public Seminar."]

"Classical Antiquity and the Fear of 'White Extinction.'" Pharos (March 29, 2019)

Cleaver, Kathleen, Danny Glover and Brian Jones. "The Black Power Mixtape." We Are Many (May 7, 2014) ["The New School and Haymarket Books present: Danny Glover, Kathleen Cleaver, and Brian Jones discussing the new book: The Black Power Mixtape: 1967-1975. Moderated by School of Media Studies Assistant Professor, Michelle Materre. The Black Power Mixtape: 1967 -- 1975 is an extraordinary window into the black freedom struggle in the United States, offering a treasure trove of fresh archival information about the Black Power movement from 1967 to 1975 and vivid portraits of some of its most dynamic participants, including Angela Davis and Stokely Carmichael. The book — like the documentary film that inspired it — includes historical speeches and interviews by: Stokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture), Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Eldridge Cleaver, Bobby Seale, Huey P. Newton, Emile de Antonio, and Angela Davis. And it also features new commentary voiced by: Erykah Badu, Talib Kweli, Harry Belafonte, Kathleen Cleaver, Angela Davis, Robin Kelley, Abiodun Oyewole, Sonia Sanchez, Bobby Seale, John Forte, and Questlove."]

Clemente, Rosa and Sary Jayaraman. "Time’s Up: Activists Join Actresses on Golden Globes Red Carpet to Call for Gender & Racial Justice." Democracy Now (January 8, 2018)

Coates, Ta-Nehisi. "Barack Obama, Ferguson, and the Evidence of Things Unsaid: Violence works. Nonviolence does too." The Atlantic (November 26, 2014)

---. "Bodily Safety: On Police Shootings." Making Contact (July 1, 2015) ["When journalist Ta-Nehisi Coates set out to write about police killings he went to visit Mable Jones. Back in 2000, Jones son, a friend of Coates from their time at Howard University, was shot and killed by police in Virginia. He was twenty five years old."]

---. "The United States of Ferguson." Moyers and Company (December 5, 2014)

Cobb, Jelani and Osagyefo Sekou. "Riot as the Language of the Unheard: Ferguson Protests Set to Continue In Fight For Racial Justice." Democracy Now (November 25, 2014)

Conason, Joe. "Missouri Burning: Why Ferguson's Inferno Is No Surprise." Truthdig (August 19, 2014)

Constantino, Bobby. "I Got Myself Arrested So I Could Look Inside the Justice System: A former prosecutor fights the law and lets it win." The Atlantic (December 17, 2013)

"Continued injustice, continued response (#BaltimoreUprising)." Best of the Left #920 (May 8, 2015)

Cook, Jonathan. "Ahed Tamimi Offers Israelis a Lesson Worthy of Gandhi." Counterpunch (January 10, 2018)

Cooke-Rivers, Jacqueline, Glenn Loury and Brandon M. Terry. "Ferguson is Everywhere." Radio Open Source (December 4, 2014)

Cooper, Brittney. "A racial state of emergency: How we prepare for devastation in Ferguson."Salon (November 19, 2014)
Crawford, Jarmahl, Peniel Joseph and Isabel Wilkerson. "Stokely Carmichael and Black Power." Radio Open Source (March 6, 2014)

Crandall, Chris, Erin Kearns and Muniba Saleem. "The Weight of Our Words." Hidden Brain (April 13, 2018) ["... we look at the language we use around race and religion, and what it says about the culture we live in."]

Crawford-Roberts, Ann, et al. "George Floyd's Autopsy and the Structural Gaslighting of America." Scientific American (June 6, 2020) ["The weaponization of medical language emboldened white supremacy with the authority of the white coat. How will we stop it from happening again?"]

Crimethinc. "What They Mean When They Say Peace." Libcom (August 23, 2014)

Crump, Benjamin and Al Sharpton. " Legacy of Civil Rights Movement Shows Need for Feds to Bring Justice if State Fails." Democracy Now (November 26, 2014)

Cullors, Patrice and Darnell L. Moore. "Ferguson protests to #FergusonNext: 5 paths to progress, after non-indictment." The Guardian (November 24, 2014)

D, Davey. "Ferguson: Police Draw Guns on Rosa Clemente, Talib & Others." Hip Hop and Politics (August 20, 2014)

---. "Report Backs from the Front lines of Ferguson & LA Over Police Shootings." Hip Hop and Politics (August 19, 2014)

---. "Wanted for Killing 3, Christopher Dorner’s Claims of Racism, Corruption Resonate with LAPD’s Critics." Democracy Now (February 11, 2013)

Danticat, Edwidge. "'Completely Racist': Edwidge Danticat on Trump’s 'Shithole Countries' Remark Targeting Africa, Haiti." Democracy Now (January 12, 2018) ["International condemnation of Donald Trump is growing after reports the president used an expletive during a meeting about immigrants from Africa, Haiti and El Salvador. While meeting with lawmakers, Trump reportedly said, “Why do we want all these people from Africa here? They’re shithole countries … We should have more people from Norway.” Trump also reportedly said, “Why do we need more Haitians? Take them out.” Earlier this morning, Trump wrote on Twitter, “The language used by me at the DACA meeting was tough, but this was not the language used. What was really tough was the outlandish proposal made–a big setback for DACA!” Trump’s remarks come weeks after The New York Times reported Trump had also disparaged Haitians and Nigerians during a closed-door meeting in June. Trump said Nigerians would never “go back to their huts” if they came to visit the U.S. As for Haitians, Trump said they “all have AIDS.” Trump’s latest remarks come just after his administration announced it is ending temporary protected status for up to 250,000 Salvadorans who have been living in the U.S. since at least 2001. Last year, the Trump administration announced it is also ending temporary protected status for tens of thousands of Haitian, Nicaraguan and Sudanese immigrants living in the United States. Trump’s remarks from Thursday have been condemned across the globe. We speak to Haitian-American novelist Edwidge Danticat as Haitians mark the eighth anniversary of the devastating 2010 earthquake."]

Davidson, Helen. "Ferguson protests continue after second police shooting." The Guardian (August 20, 2014)

Davis, Angela. Are Prisons Obsolete? Seven Stories Press, 2003. ["With her characteristic brilliance, grace and radical audacity, Angela Y. Davis has put the case for the latest abolition movement in American life: the abolition of the prison. As she quite correctly notes, American life is replete with abolition movements, and when they were engaged in these struggles, their chances of success seemed almost unthinkable. For generations of Americans, the abolition of slavery was sheerest illusion. Similarly,the entrenched system of racial segregation seemed to last forever, and generations lived in the midst of the practice, with few predicting its passage from custom. The brutal, exploitative (dare one say lucrative?) convict-lease system that succeeded formal slavery reaped millions to southern jurisdictions (and untold miseries for tens of thousands of men, and women). Few predicted its passing from the American penal landscape. Davis expertly argues how social movements transformed these social, political and cultural institutions, and made such practices untenable. In Are Prisons Obsolete?, Professor Davis seeks to illustrate that the time for the prison is approaching an end. She argues forthrightly for “decarceration”, and argues for the transformation of the society as a whole."]

Davis, Darryl. "Racial Injustice: KKKrossing The Divide." How Do We Fix It? (June 5, 2020) ["To gain some insight on what can be done to address discrimination and tensions between races, we speak with R&B and blues musician Daryl Davis, a black man who has spent the past 35 years on a remarkable quest of speaking with, and at times befriending, members of white supremacist groups. He has helped more than 200 KKK members to renounce their racist ideology. "We have to ask ourselves the question: do I want to sit back and see what my country becomes, or do I want to stand up and make my country become what I want to see," Daryl tells us. "I've chosen the latter. And so you have to get into the thick of it." As a race conciliator and lecturer, Davis has received numerous awards and is often sought by CNN, MSNBC, NPR and other media outlets as a consultant on race relations and white supremacy."]

Davis, Natalie Zemon. "World-Renowned Historian Natalie Zemon Davis Pleads Case of Steven Salaita with U-Illinois." Informed Comment (August 29, 2014)

Demby, Gene, Kara Frame and Maria Paz Guttierez. "Housing Segregation is Everything." Code Switch (April 11, 2018) ["Housing segregation is in everything. But to understand the root of this issue, you have to look at the government-backed policies that created the housing disparities we see today. Gene Demby explains how these policies came to be, and what effect they've had on schools, health, family wealth and policing."]

Devereaux, Ryan. "A Night in Ferguson: Rubber Bullets, Tear Gas, and a Jail Cell." The Intercept (August 19, 2014)

---. "Border Patrol Agents Tried to Delete Racist and Obscene Facebook Posts. We Archived Them." The Intercept (July 5, 2019)

---. "Rubber Bullets, Tear Gas and Jail: Ferguson Police Crack Down on Journalists Covering Protests." Democracy Now (August 20, 2014)

Devereaux, Ryan, Sunita Patel and Nicholas Peart. "Testimony, Recordings at Trial Reveal the Racial Biases and Arrest Quotas Behind NYPD’s Stop & Frisk." Democracy Now (April 4, 2013)

Davis, Sandra Dibble Katrina. "Officer punched as tensions flare at 'Patriot Picnic' in San Diego's Chicano Park." Los Angeles Times (February 3, 2018)

Documenting Hate ProPublica (Ongoing Archive) ["Hate crimes and bias incidents are a national problem, but there’s no reliable data on their nature or prevalence. We’re collecting and verifying reports, building a database of tips for use by journalists, researchers and civil-rights organizations."]


Documenting Hate: Charlottesville Season 36, Episode 15 (PBS, 2018: 55 mins) ["In Documenting Hate: Charlottesville, FRONTLINE and Pro Publica investigate the white supremacists and neo-Nazis involved in the 2017 Charlottesville Unite the Right rally. This is the first in a series of two Documenting Hate films from FRONTLINE and ProPublica, with the second coming later this fall."]

Documenting Hate: New American NAZIs Frontline (November 20, 2018) ["In the wake of the deadly anti-Semitic attack at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh, FRONTLINE and ProPublica present a new investigation into white supremacist groups in America – in particular, a neo-Nazi group, Atomwaffen Division, that has actively recruited inside the U.S. military. Continuing FRONTLINE and ProPublica’s reporting on violent white supremacists in the U.S. (which has helped lead to multiple arrests), this joint investigation shows the group’s terrorist objectives and how it gained strength after the 2017 Charlottesville rally."]


Downes, Nathaniel. "Anonymous To ID Michael Brown’s Killer – Already Has Paralyzed Ferguson." Addicting Info (August 14, 2014)

Dubal, Veena. "Presumed Guilty: American Muslims and Arabs (9-11 Encore Edition)." Making Contact (September 6, 2011)

Dunbar-Ortiz, Roxanne. An Indigenous Peoples' History of America. Beacon Press, 2014: 1-14; 133-161. ["Today in the United States, there are more than five hundred federally recognized Indigenous nations comprising nearly three million people, descendants of the fifteen million Native people who once inhabited this land. The centuries-long genocidal program of the US settler-colonial regimen has largely been omitted from history. Now, for the first time, acclaimed historian and activist Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz offers a history of the United States told from the perspective of Indigenous peoples and reveals how Native Americans, for centuries, actively resisted expansion of the US empire.
With growing support for movements such as the campaign to abolish Columbus Day and replace it with Indigenous Peoples’ Day and the Dakota Access Pipeline protest led by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States is an essential resource providing historical threads that are crucial for understanding the present. In An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States, Dunbar-Ortiz adroitly challenges the founding myth of the United States and shows how policy against the Indigenous peoples was colonialist and designed to seize the territories of the original inhabitants, displacing or eliminating them. And as Dunbar-Ortiz reveals, this policy was praised in popular culture, through writers like James Fenimore Cooper and Walt Whitman, and in the highest offices of government and the military. Shockingly, as the genocidal policy reached its zenith under President Andrew Jackson, its ruthlessness was best articulated by US Army general Thomas S. Jesup, who, in 1836, wrote of the Seminoles: “The country can be rid of them only by exterminating them.” Spanning more than four hundred years, this classic bottom-up peoples’ history radically reframes US history and explodes the silences that have haunted our national narrative."]

El-Ad, Hagai. "'Reminiscent of South Africa's Grand Apartheid': Israeli Human Rights Group Slams Israel at U.N." Democracy Now (October 22, 2018) ["Shortly after Israel announced a new “zero tolerance” policy toward demonstrations in Gaza, some 130 Palestinians were injured Friday while protesting ongoing Israeli occupation and demanding the right of return. Four paramedics and 25 children were among the injured. Ten thousand protesters gathered along Israel’s heavily militarized separation barrier with Gaza as part of the weekly Great March of Return protests that began March 30. Since then, Israeli forces have killed at least 170 Palestinians, including more than 30 children, and injured thousands more. We speak with Hagai El-Ad, the executive director of the Israeli human rights organization B’Tselem. He was in New York last week testifying before the U.N. Security Council officially for the first time."]

Elba, Mariam. "How Islamophobia was Ingrained in America's Legal System Long Before the War on Terror." The Intercept (May 6, 2018)

Ellis, C.P. "Why I Quit the Klan." American Dreams Lost and Found (Interviewed by Studs Terkel: 1980)

"End Mass Incarceration Now!" The New York Times (May 25, 2014)

"Entertainer Sings 'Bad, Bad Michael Brown' At Ex-Police Charity Dinner (video)." Crooks and Liars (December 23, 2014)

Epstein, Hedy. "Stop the Violence from Ferguson to Gaza: 90-Year-Old Holocaust Survivor Arrested in St. Louis." Democracy Now (August 20, 2014)

Estefan, Kareem, et al. "Understanding Boycott, Divest, Sanctions (BDS)." Best of the Left #1249 (February 12, 2019) ["Today we take a look at both the BDS movement and the backlash response to it resulting in firings and legislation in many states (and pending federally) to restrict employment and business opportunities from those who fail to pledge in writing to not support of the boycott of Israel."]

Estep, Bill. "Lexington attorney sues Clay Co. officials over strip search at jail." Lexington Herald-Leader (June 8, 2011)

Estes, Nick.  "Indigenous Historian Nick Estes on Toppling Statues, Racist Team Names & COVID-19 in Indian Country." Democracy Now (July 6, 2020) ["President Trump’s visit to Mount Rushmore comes after months of escalating coronavirus infections in Native communities, but Indigenous scholar and activist Nick Estes says South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem, like many of her Republican counterparts across the U.S., has taken a “hallucination-based approach to the COVID-19 pandemic,” and notes she refused to enforce social distancing at this weekend’s event that attracted thousands of people. He also reacts to growing pressure on the Washington Redskins and Cleveland Indians to change their racist names." Part 1: "'He Wasn’t Invited': How Trump’s Racist Mt. Rushmore Celebration Violated Indigenous Sovereignty.".]

---. "Our History of the Future." Dig (June 29, 2019) ["Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance."]

Eugenics and Other Ethical Issues (Biotechnology 101) Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

Evans, Gavin. "The Unwelcome Revival of 'Race Science': Its defenders claim to be standing up for uncomfortable truths, but race science is still as bogus as ever." The Guardian (March 2, 2018)
Faroul, Rachelle and Aaron Glanz. "Kept Out: Banks Across U.S. Caught Systematically Rejecting People of Color for Home Loans." Democracy Now (February 15, 2018) ["A shocking new investigation by Reveal and the Center for Investigative Reporting has uncovered evidence that African Americans and Latinos are continuing to be routinely denied conventional mortgage loans at rates far higher than their white counterparts across the country. Reveal based its report on a review of 31 million mortgage records filed with the federal government in 2015 and 2016. The Reveal investigation found the redlining occurring across the country, including in Washington, D.C., Atlanta, Detroit, Philadelphia, St. Louis and San Antonio. We speak to Aaron Glantz, senior reporter at Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, and Rachelle Faroul, a 33-year-old African-American woman who was rejected twice by lenders when she tried to buy a brick row house in Philadelphia, where Reveal found African Americans were 2.7 times as likely as whites to be denied a conventional mortgage."]

Fazli, Shehryar. "The Legacy of Eric Garner: Policing Still Going Wrong." Los Angeles Review of Books (December 11, 2017)

Feidt, Dan. "The Secret Chats of the Alt-Right." On the Media (March 22, 2019) ["What happens behind the scenes as the foot soldiers of far-right groups debate and plan their next moves? One place to find out is on a chatroom platform called Discord. Popular among gamers and other internet-savvy communities, it's also become a home for those looking to meet like-minded white nationalists. A large trove of their back-and-forth was uncovered by the left-wing media collective Unicorn Riot, which then revealed the conversations of neo-Nazi groups such as Patriot Front and the now-defunct Traditionalist Workers Party. Unicorn Riot scored its first load of Discord chats in August 2017 — the weekend of the "Unite the Right" rally in Charlottesville. It reported stories, shared the leaked chats and built a database of hundreds of thousands of messages completely open to the public. Bob speaks with Dan Feidt, co-founder of Unicorn Riot, about what his team has learned since the project began."]

Feige, David. "The Independent Grand Jury That Wasn’t: The Ferguson prosecutor’s bizarre, self-justifying press conference revealed his own influence." Slate (November 25, 2014)

Feldman, David. "The Meanings of Antisemitism." Backdoor Broadcasting Company (February 13, 2017) ["Antisemitism has figured in British political debates in the last year as never before. In this lecture, David Feldman examines the changing meanings of antisemitism since the term was first coined. He reveals a new history of the Jews’ struggle for equality from the late-nineteenth century and explains why the politics of antisemitism today generate so much controversy. David Feldman is Director of the Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism and also a Professor of History at Birkbeck, University of London. He is currently writing an intellectual and political history of the concept of antisemitism in Britain from its introduction in the 1880s to the present."]

"Ferguson: Brown jury decides not to charge officer." BBC World News (November 25, 2014)

Ferguson, Leo. "Combating Antisemitism." On the Media (May 3, 2019) ["After the attack in Pittsburgh, Bob spoke with Jews for Racial and Economic Justice organizer Leo Ferguson about how to understand the roots of antisemitism and the way it has functioned throughout history in order to help make sense of the threat it poses today. This week, Bob again speaks with Ferguson, who argues that we need to call out and root out antisemitism where we see it — but that the work of combating antisemitism also includes building cross-cultural coalitions that fight against white supremacy and for economic justice."]

"Ferguson October: Thousands March in St. Louis for Police Reform & Arrest of Officer Darren Wilson." Democracy Now (October 13, 2014)

"Ferguson reacts to grand jury decision LIVE UPDATES." RT (November 25, 2014)

"Ferguson Syllabus." Sociologists for Justice (2014)

Fields, Karen E. and Barbara J. Fields. Racecraft: The Soul of Inequality in America. Verso, 2012. ["Most people assume that racism grows from a perception of human difference: the fact of race gives rise to the practice of racism. Sociologist Karen E. Fields and historian Barbara J. Fields argue otherwise: the practice of racism produces the illusion of race, through what they call “racecraft.” And this phenomenon is intimately entwined with other forms of inequality in American life. So pervasive are the devices of racecraft in American history, economic doctrine, politics, and everyday thinking that the presence of racecraft itself goes unnoticed. That the promised post-racial age has not dawned, the authors argue, reflects the failure of Americans to develop a legitimate language for thinking about and discussing inequality. That failure should worry everyone who cares about democratic institutions."]

Freedom Riders (USA: Stanley Nelson, 2012: 117 mins)

Friedersdorf, Connor. "The Brutality of Police Culture in Baltimore." The Atlantic (April 22, 2015) ["Years of abuses are every bit as egregious as what the Department of Justice documented in Ferguson, Missouri, and as deserving of a national response."]

Gaffney, Adam. "A History of Putting a Price on Everything: Why policymakers calculate the cost of life and death, sickness and health." The New Republic (December 1, 2017)

Gallagher, Katherine, John Kiriakou and Sejal Zota. "Gina Haspel, Rule of Law and Torture; The National Immigration Project And Protecting Haitian Refugees." Law and Disorder Radio (March 26, 2018) ["Gina Haspel, Rule of Law And Torture: Nazi generals and Nazi leaders were prosecuted at the end of World War II for war crimes and crimes against humanity and genocide. These crimes were incorporated into international law. The chief prosecutor was Robert Jackson, a Supreme Court judge. The Nazis defended themselves by arguing that they were just following orders. This defense was deemed unavailing. In many cases, they were found guilty and sentenced to lengthy prison terms or hung. He said that the war crimes tribunal at Nirenberg was not merely victors’ justice. But that the principles it followed would be universal and applied in the future, to all countries including the USA. And indeed, the United States signed on to the Geneva Conventions and Convention Against Torture and incorporate both the crimes and the concept of universal jurisdiction into its law. Gina Haspel has been nominated by President Donald Trump to head the CIA. She is a war criminal. She violated both international and national law by running a black site secret detention center in Thailand where men were tortured. Although there were several court orders that the evidence be preserved, Gina Haspel had the videotapes of torture destroyed. John Brennan, Obama’s ex head of the CIA, who was involved in the torture program, recently came to her defense, stating that she was just following orders: The Nazi defense. Trump supports torture. He believes that torture works. This is both immoral and untrue. He says he is for waterboarding and worse. He now has a subordinate with whom he is in agreement. Obama refused to prosecute the lawbreakers. Instead he threw CIA whistleblower John Kiriakou in prison for two years for disclosing American torture. He said we must look forward, not backward. This greenlighted what is going on now with Haspel. Michael Ratner warned us about this eventuality. The European Center for Human and Constitutional Rights may seek Haspel’s arrest if she goes to Germany. Such is the irony of history that the German fascist government that perpetrated the greatest crimes against humanity has been superseded by an American government which condones and is perpetuating them as well.
The National Immigration Project And Protecting Haitian Refugees: The National Immigration Project of the National Lawyers Guild filed a lawsuit in Brooklyn on March 15 to block President Trump’s cancellation of temporary protected status which had been granted to more than 50,000 Haitian refugees because of the terrible conditions in that country since the hurricane in 2010. The National Immigration Project declared President Trump’s actions to be unlawful, racially motivated, and evidence of a complete lack of knowledge of immigration law. The TPS program exempts from deportation people from countries in turmoil due to war, natural disasters, and other extraordinary conditions. The suit alleges that the federal government was arbitrary and capricious in his decision to end the program and was motivated by Donald Trump’s “racial and national origin animus towards patients.” The suit cites Trump’s demeaning remarks towards Haitians and Haiti. He has said that Haitians have AIDS and Haiti is a “s&*t hole” country. The Trump administration‘s position is that protecting Haitians is no longer necessary because conditions in Haiti have improved."]

Gartrell, Nate and Katie Nelson. "More than 40 arrested in Oakland as protesters block freeway, set fires after Ferguson cop not indicted." San Jose Mercury News (November 24, 2014)

German, Mike. "Ex-FBI Agent Speaks Out: Federal Authorities Have Downplayed White Supremacist Violence for Too Long." Democracy Now (August 5, 2019) ["According to The New York Times, white extremist shooters have now killed at least 63 people in the United States over the past 18 months. Late last month, FBI Director Christopher Wray told members of the Senate Judiciary Committee that crime driven by racism and white supremacy was on the rise compared to the past nine months. But former FBI agents say there is reluctance within the agency to tackle white nationalist violence in part due to President Trump’s rhetoric. We speak with Mike German, fellow at the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University Law. From 1988 to 2004, German served as an FBI agent specializing in domestic counterterrorism."]

Gerard, Lydia, Sharon Lavigne and Pam Spees. "Combating Corporate Contamination in Cancer Alley." The Activist Files #14 (May 9, 2019) ["Senior Staff Attorney Pam Spees talks with Lydia Gerard and Sharon Lavigne, two of the brave Women of Cancer Alley leading the resistance to the toxic petrochemical industry in Louisiana. Cancer Alley is an 85-mile stretch of land with a high concentration of petrochemical companies. It also is populated by primarily Black communities with high rates of health problems, including respiratory problems, the highest risk of cancer in the country, and even unexplained health problems. Both women share their personal stories--the difficulties Sharon's grandchildren have had breathing, Lydia's loss of her husband to kidney cancer--and the way those experiences fueled their fight in the face of indifferent corporations and lackluster government action. Later this month, many of those involved in this struggle will participate in a March for Justice, demanding government action--including the reduction of emissions, a moratorium on new plants, and the closer of certain existing plants. Give the episode a listen, and spread the word about this important fight for racial and environmental justice."]

Gillam, Carey. "Police in Ferguson committed human rights abuses: Amnesty report." Reuters(October 24, 2014)

Giroux, Henry A. "Racism and the Aesthetic of Hyperreal Violence: Pulp Fiction and Other Visual Tragedies." Social Identities 1:2 (1995): 333-354.

Glantz, Aaron and Vincent Hughes. "Modern-Day Redlining: Banks Face Probes for Refusing Home Loans for People of Color." Democracy Now (February 27, 2018) ["A shocking new investigation by Reveal and the Center for Investigative Reporting has uncovered evidence that African Americans and Latinos continue to be routinely denied conventional mortgage loans, even at rates far higher than their white counterparts, across the country. According to the piece, the homeownership gap between whites and African Americans is now wider than it was during the Jim Crow era. Reveal based its report on a review of 31 million mortgage records filed with the federal government in 2015 and 2016. The investigation found the redlining occurring across the country, including in Washington, D.C., Atlanta, Detroit, Philadelphia, St. Louis, and San Antonio, Texas. Since its publication earlier this month, the report has sparked national outrage and, in some states, unusually swift political action. Pennsylvania’s attorney general and state treasurer have both launched investigations into redlining in Philadelphia. We speak to Pennsylvania state Senator Vincent Hughes and Aaron Glantz, senior reporter at Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting. His new investigation is headlined 'Kept out: How banks block people of color from homeownership.'"]

Goodman, Amy. "The Ghost of Dred Scott Haunts the Streets of Ferguson." Truthdig (August 20, 2014)
---. "Troy Davis and the Politics of Death." TruthDig (September 13, 2011)

Gordon-Reed, Annette. "Thomas Jefferson, Sally Hemings, and the Burden of Slavery." Conversations with History (September 28, 2016) ["Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Harvard Professor Annette Gordon-Reed for a discussion of her work as a lawyer/historian focusing on the contradictions of the life of Thomas Jefferson. Recalling her intellectual odyssey. Professor Gordon-Reed elucidates her contribution to Jeffersonian scholarship including her most recent book “The Most Blessed of Patriarchs”: Thomas Jefferson and the Empire of Imagination(written with Peter S. Onuf). Topics covered in the conversation include how her training as a lawyer empowered her to overturn the conventional historical view of the relationship between Jefferson and Sally Hemings. Professor Gordon-Reed highlights the structural intellectual racism at the heart of Jeffersonian historiography which ignored the factual evidence which pointed to Jefferson as the father of Sally Heming’s children. In examining the evolution of Jefferson’s ideas on slavery, Professor Gordon-Reed emphasizes how Jefferson’s theory of slavery evolved as he adapted to the reality of American social and political life. She concludes with an the implications of her work for understanding the present turmoil over black/ white relations in the U.S. today."]

Gott, Molly. "End-of-Year Round-up for Ferguson Protests: More than 600 Arrests, At Least 18 Still in Jail with Serious Charges." More (December 31, 2014)

Graeber, David. "Ferguson and the Criminalization of American Life." Gawker (March 19, 2015)

Graham, David A. "The Absence of Legitimate Authority in Baltimore." The Atlantic (April 28, 2015)

Grandin, Greg. "The Border Patrol Has Been a Cult of Brutality Since 1924." The Intercept (January 12, 2019)

Greenlee, Carol and Gilbert King. "The Groveland Four: Florida Pardons Men Falsely Accused in Jim Crow-Era Rape Case in 1949." Democracy Now (January 14, 2019) ["Florida Governor Ron DeSantis has granted posthumous pardons to four young African-American men accused of raping a white woman near Groveland, Florida, in 1949. Two men were brutally murdered as a result of the false accusations. The case is now seen as a racially charged miscarriage of justice emblematic of the Jim Crow South. The story of the “Groveland Four,” now 70 years old, has continued to haunt the state of Florida. We speak with Gilbert King, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of “Devil in the Grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the Dawn of a New America,” and Carol Greenlee, daughter of Charles Greenlee, one of the Groveland Four."]

Greenwald, Glenn. "The Militarization of U.S. Police: Finally Dragged Into the Light by the Horrors of Ferguson." The Intercept (August 14, 2014)

Guisado, Angelo. "Necessary to the Security of a Free State." Current Affairs (May 8, 2019) ["On the history of the second amendment, white militias, and border vigilantism…"]

Haankes, Keegan, Rachel Janik and Michael Edison Hayden. "Shooting at Poway Synagogue Underscores Link Between Internet Radicalization and Violence." Hatewatch (April 28, 2019)

Hanarahan, Noelle and Stephen Vittoria. "'Long Distance Revolutionary': Mumia Abu-Jamal’s Journey from Black Panthers to Prison Journalist." Democracy Now (February 1, 2013)

Hart-Landsberg, Marty. "Class, Race and Wealth Inequality." Economic Front (January 3, 2018)


"Hate and Extremism." Southern Poverty Law Center (Ongoing Archive and Mapping)

Hayden, Michael Edison. "Prolific Alt-Right Propagandist's Identity Confirmed." Hatewatch (May 1, 2019)

Hemmer, Nicole. "The Summer of Hate." A12 (August 22, 2018) [“How the people of Charlottesville responded to months of white supremacist organizing and violence in the city."]

Henry, Marsha. "Reimagining Peacekeeping: Gender, Race, and Militarisation in the Global Order." The London School of Economics and Political Science (September 20, 2017)  ["Marsha Henry argues for reimagining peacekeeping, which starts with a return to critical theories and concepts in order to acknowledge the production of gendered, racial and classed inequalities in peacekeeping spaces and relations. In particular, turning to critical concepts such as standpoint, power geometries and space-time continuum, the colour line, militarised femininities, and intersectionality, the lecture traces the practical and policy dead-ends that arise when peacekeeping studies relies on policy and practice driven objectives, alone.  Marsha Henry is Associate Professor in the Department of Gender Studies and Deputy Director of the Centre for Women, Peace and Security."]

Holt-Giménez, Eric. "A Foodie's Guide to Capitalism." The Distillery (Season 1 - ND) ["People are not going hungry because of food scarcity but because of inequality. Introducing global food systems and how they impact farmers and consumers, Eric Holt-Giménez unpacks the intersections of class, gender, and race from the unique vantage point of the food economy."]

Hogan, Liam. "Debunking the Imagery of the 'Irish Slaves' Meme." Medium (September 14, 2015)

Holloway, Kali. "7 things the United Daughters of the Confederacy might not want you to know about them." Salon (October 6, 2018)  ["The organization keeps Confederate statues standing and spreads lies about America’s history of slavery."]

"How black women are leading the #BlackLivesMatter movement." America Tonight (December 18, 2014)

"Huffington Post Reporter Arrested in Ferguson." Huffington Post (August 13, 2014)

Hussain, Sophia. "Ferguson and the normalization of black murder." Verso (August 25, 2014)

Hyman, Louis. "The Radical Catalog." On the Media (October 18, 2018) ["Another chapter in the history of American consumerism came to a close this week when the retail giant Sears announced it was filing for bankruptcy and closing 142 of its unprofitable stores. As experts sifted through the details about what doomed Sears, we found ourselves reading a Twitter thread about a little-known bit of shopping history. Louis Hymanis an economic historian and professor at Cornell University’s School of Industrial and Labor Relations. He tweeted: "In my history of consumption class, I teach about Sears, but what most people don't know is just how radical the catalogue was in the era of Jim Crow." In this week's podcast extra, Hyman talks to Brooke about what we can learn from the way Sears upended Jim Crow power dynamics, and what lessons it offers about capitalism more broadly. His latest book is Temp: How American Work, American Business, and the American Dream Became Temporary."]

"Identity Unmasked." Intelligence Report #167 (Summer 2019) ["Using fake names and fictional avatars, wannabe killers and hatemongers exude courage and commitment to their hateful causes. Until the world learns their real names. Until someone exposes their plans. In the anonymity provided by chat rooms, angry, prejudiced hate-filled people express lethal intentions and develop plots to harm or marginalize people because of their faith, ethnicity or sexual orientation. In this issue of the Intelligence Report, we unmask people who are brave in the dark and expose the impact of fighting hate with light."]

Immerwahr, Daniel. "Empire State of Mind." On the Media (April 5, 2019) ["Recently, a member of the Trump administration called Puerto Rico “that country,” obscuring once more the relationship between the island colony and the American mainland. In a special hour this week, On the Media examines the history of US imperialism — and why the familiar US map hides the true story of our country. Brooke spends the hour with Northwestern University historian Daniel Immerwahr, author of How to Hide an Empire: A History of the Greater United States."]

"Indigenous/Native American: Histories & Cultures." Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Online Archive)

Institute for Research and Education on Human Rights. "Tea Party Nationalism." (Special Report: Fall 2010)

Janis, Stephen. "Baltimore: Problems And Conditions Precipitating Police Brutality In The Community!" Building Bridges Radio (May 4, 2015)

Jensen, Robert, et al. "The Psychology of Transition: Undoing Millennia of Social Control." Unwelcome Guests #597 (March 31, 2012)

Jhally, Sut and Rachel Weber. "Mass. Judge Refuses to Halt Pro-Palestinian Event at UMass Featuring Roger Waters & Linda Sarsour." Democracy Now (May 3, 2019) ["“Not Backing Down: Israel, Free Speech, and the Battle for Palestinian Human Rights.” That’s the title of an event set to take place Saturday at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. After three anonymous UMass students filed a lawsuit to stop the event, a judge ruled Thursday the event can proceed, saying, “There’s nothing that comes even close to a threat of harm or incitement to violence or lawlessness.” Part Two: "Roger Waters on Palestine: “You Have to Stand Up for People’s Human Rights All Over the World."" ]



Johnson, Adam and Nima Shirazi. "Hollywood & Anti-Muslim Racism (Part 1) - Action and Adventure Schlock." Citations Needed #113 (July 8, 2020) ["The United States and its close allies Saudi Arabia and Israel have been bombing and occupying large sections of the so-called “Muslim world” for decades – drastically ramping up after the 9/11 attacks and seemingly with no end in sight. The U.S., like all empires, cannot operate a large, complex system premised on violence, meddling and subjugation without a moral pretext. This moral pretext, even before 9/11, was primarily about fighting a war on so-called “Terrorism” or “Islamic extremism” while allegedly promoting “stability,” “freedom” and “democracy.” Along with American news media’s constant fear-mongering over scary Muslims lurking in the shadows, a major pillar propping up this moral pretext is pop culture – namely the cultural products coming out of Hollywood. Our decades-long "War on Terror" would no doubt be much more difficult to sustain without a constant reminder from TV and film that, despite the fact that the average American is more likely to be killed by a vending machine than a terrorist attack, the threat of Islamic terrorism remains ever-present and existential, marked by an inevitable “clash of civilizations” devoid of context or any notion that the U.S. is a primary driver of violence across the globe. Over the course of three episodes, we'll be taking a look at how Hollywood’s television and studio film output helps prop up America’s military aggression in the Middle East, engages in both casual and explicit racism, strips conflicts of any historical or imperial context pushes the idea the only Good Muslim is a snitch or CIA agent, and generally leaves its audience angry and ill-informed.  In this episode, we review Hollywood’s long history of anti-Muslim racism in both classic and campy action/adventure films and TV and how it both primed us for – and sustains – the never-ending and self-perpetuating "War on Terror.""]

Johnson, Hannibal B. "'Disruptor on Road to Reconciliation': Trump Doubles Down on Rally in Tulsa, Site of 1921 Massacre." Democracy Now (June 17, 2020) ["President Donald Trump says he will push ahead with a massive campaign rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on Saturday, even as COVID cases are surging there as the state reopens. Trump delayed the rally by one day after it was originally scheduled for June 19, Juneteenth, a celebration marking the emancipation of enslaved people. Tulsa is also the site of one of the deadliest massacres in U.S. history, when a white mob in 1921 killed as many as 300 people in a thriving African American business district. “The rally is troubling to a lot of people because of both the venue, Tulsa, and because of the timing,” says Hannibal B. Johnson, attorney and author of “Black Wall Street: From Riot to Renaissance in Tulsa’s Historic Greenwood District.”"]

Johnson, Walter, et al. "To Remake the World: Slavery, Racial Capitalism, and Justice." Boston Review (February 20, 2018)

Jolna, Karon and Aviva Dove-Viebahn, eds. Gender, Race and Class: From the Pages of Ms. Magazine, 1972 - Present.  (ND)

Kafer, Gary. "Surveillance capitalism and its racial discontents." Jump Cut #59 (Fall 2019)

Kahle, Trish. "Teaching in an Uprising: Readings on Race and Democracy." Black Perspectives (June 2, 2020)

Kahn, Emcee Ayesha, et al. "Combating Islamophobia in the Media." Needs No Introduction (April 11, 2016) 

Kalven, Jamie. "Chicago Faces a Defining Moment in Police Reform and Civil Order." The Intercept (August 15, 2018) ["Chicago has a unique opportunity to confront fundamental issues of racial justice as it debates a consent decree on police reform."]

Kelley, Robin D.G. "Black Study, Black Struggle." Boston Review (March 7, 2016)

---. "What Did Cedric Robinson Mean by Racial Capitalism?" Boston Review (January 12, 2017)

Kendi, Ibram X. "The challenge of antiracist thought to a racist society." This is Hell #1070 (August 24, 2019) ["Historian Ibram X. Kendi discusses racism and antiracism in American society - from the production and maintenance of racist thought to disguise inequity and manipulate the working class, to the promise of an antiracist challenge to the power structures that divide people from each other and a future lived in communion with all people. Ibram is author of How To Be An Antiracist from One World Literature."]

---. "From George Floyd to Chris Cooper: Ibram X. Kendi on 'Racist Terror' Facing Black People in America." Democracy Now (May 27, 2020) ["“I can’t breathe” — that’s what George Floyd, an unarmed African American man, repeatedly told a white Minneapolis police officer who pinned him to the ground Monday with a knee to his neck. Video of the police attack went viral. Now four officers have been fired. This comes as another video went viral of a white woman calling the cops on a Black man in New York City’s Central Park and falsely accusing him of “threatening her life” after he asked her to leash her dog. We discuss these developments and more with Ibram X. Kendi, founding director of the Antiracist Research and Policy Center at American University and National Book Award–winning author of “Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America” and “How to Be an Antiracist.”"]


---. "White Supremacist in the White House: Ibram X. Kendi on Trump’s Calls for 'Law & Order' in Kenosha." Democracy Now (August 31, 2020) ["In Part Two of our interview with Ibram X. Kendi, director of the Center for Antiracist Research at Boston University, we air excerpts from the families of Jacob Blake and George Floyd at the massive protest marking the 57th anniversary of the March on Washington, and discuss President Trump’s planned visit to Kenosha, Wisconsin, as he blames Democrats for violence during protests there and in Portland, Oregon. “Racism has spread to every part of the body,” says Kendi, comparing U.S. racism to cancer, “and then we have a president who is claiming that it doesn’t exist.”"]

Kersgaard, Scot. "Alabama gives birth to a new civil rights movement." The Colorado Independent (November 16, 2011)

Kimmell, Michael. "Toward a Pedagogy of the Oppressor." Tikkun (November/December 2002)

King, Martin Luther, Jr. "Letter From a Birmingham Jail." African Studies Center of University of Pennsylvania (April 16, 1963)

---. "Newly Discovered 1964 MLK Speech on Civil Rights, Segregation & Apartheid South Africa." Democracy Now (January 15, 2018) ["In a Democracy Now! and Pacifica Radio Archives exclusive, we air a newly discovered recording of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. On December 7, 1964, days before he received the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo, King gave a major address in London on segregation, the fight for civil rights and his support for Nelson Mandela and the anti-apartheid struggle in South Africa. The speech was recorded by Saul Bernstein, who was working as the European correspondent for Pacifica Radio. Bernstein’s recording was recently discovered by Brian DeShazor, director of the Pacifica Radio Archives."]

King, Shaun. "The Bigot Threatening CNN Got Out In Time for Dinner." The Intercept (January 24, 2018)

Kinzer, Stephen and William Murphy, Jr. "US Wars and Social Control (From Regime Change Abroad to the War on Drugs at Home)." Unwelcome Guests #304 (April 30, 2006) ["In our first hour, this week, Stephen Kinzer, whose book, Overthrow, details the US empire's long history of instigating regime change, both the public pretext and the real interests at play. In our second hour, William Murphy Jr speaks about the "War On Drugs"."]

Knight, Michael Muhammad. "The Innocence of White People." Vice (September 18, 2012)

Kuldova, Tereza. "Lookism: Why we don't want to be perceived as "ugly" or "different." Antropologi (December 13, 2011)

Kumanyika, Chenjerai. "Getting Real About the Job of Police: A Letter to Barack Obama." The Intercept (June 3, 2020)

Lacy, Claudia and Jacqueline Olive. "A Modern-Day Lynching?: Always in Season Looks at 2014 Hanging in NC & Legacy of Racial Terrorism." Democracy Now (February 1, 2019) ["As we mark the beginning of Black History Month, we look at “Always in Season,” a disturbing new documentary that examines lynching in the United States both past and present. It interviews Bryan Stevenson, founder of the Equal Justice Initiative, which built the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery to remember the more than 4,000 African Americans lynched in the United States. It also looks closely at the case of Lennon Lacy, a 17-year-old African-American high school student who, on August 29, 2014, was found hanging from two belts attached to a wooden swing set in a largely white trailer park in Bladenboro, North Carolina. At the time of his death, Lacy was dating an older white woman. Local authorities quickly determined his death to be a suicide, but Lacy’s family and local civil rights activists feared authorities may have been covering up a lynching. We speak with Lacy’s mother, Claudia Lacy, and Jacqueline Olive, the director of “Always in Season.”"]

Laden, Greg. "#Ferguson Police Are At Your Door." Science Blogs (August 14, 2014)

Landrieu, Mitch, et al. "Confronting the Legacy of the Confederacy." Best of the Left #1186 (May 29, 2018) ["Today we take a look at the legacy of the Confederacy, the monuments and white supremacy it left behind and the racial terror institutionalized in America based on upholding its values."]

Lavender, George and Jasmin Lopez. "Oakland Reacts to #Ferguson in photos and audio." Making Contact (November 25, 2014)

Lemieux, Jamilah. "Baltimore Been Burning." Ebony (April 28, 2015) ["AS THE STREETS OF BALTIMORE EXPLODE WITH RAGE FOLLOWING THE POLICE KILLING OF FREDDIE GRAY, JAMILAH LEMIEUX SAYS NO ONE SHOULD BE SURPRISED."]

Lenz, Lyz. "Sorry Not Sorry." On the Media (July 15, 2020) ["Fox Primetime host Tucker Carlson has already had quite the July. On the plus side, the latest ratings for his show have made him officially the most watched cable news host. On the other side of the ledger, advertisers are fleeing his show on the grounds of not wishing to be associated with lies and hate speech. Oh, also, his head writer Blake Neff, was forced out after his explicitly racist and misogynist social media posts were unmasked online. And now Tucker is off the show for two weeks, as he put it “on a long-planned vacation.” "]

Leonnig, Carol D., Kimberly Kindy and Joel Achenbach. "Darren Wilson’s first job was on a troubled police force disbanded by authorities." The Washington Post (August 23, 2014)
López, Ian Haney. "The Dog Whistle Politics of Race." Moyers & Company (February 28, 2014)

---. "Dog Whistling About ISIS — and Latinos Too." Moyers & Co. (September 30, 2014)

Loewinger, Micah. "How Youtube's Left is Changing Minds." On the Media (July 19, 2019) ["The president’s racist tweets this weekend provoked revulsion throughout the mainstream media. But on YouTube, America’s most popular social media site, racism has found a home. Free of old-school gate-keeping, YouTube hosts a much wider political spectrum, reaching very impressionable eyes and ears. On the Media producer Micah Loewinger tells the story of three young viewers whose right-wing beliefs melted away after encountering videos by an informal movement of leftist creators known as Left Tube. He spoke with two of Left Tube's most famous personalities, Natalie Wynn (ContraPoints) and Oliver Thorn (Philosophy Tube) about how they think about crafting compelling videos. "]

Love, David. "FBI Tracks & Arrests ‘Black Identity Extremist’ and Hardly Anyone Is Talking About It." Atlanta Black Star (February 5, 2018)

Love, David A. "Baltimore Police spin news of gangs uniting to protest into ‘credible threat’." Grio (April 28, 2015)

Ludwig, Mike. "As Police Continue Ferguson Crackdown, Protesters Vow to Keep Taking the Streets." Truthout (August 19, 2014)

Luxenberg, Steve. "Separate and Unequal." On the Media (March 8, 2019)  ["Throughout the 1800s, the question at the heart of nearly every political, cultural and academic conversation dealt in some capacity with whether Black Americans were eligible for full citizenship. Our collective understanding of 19th-century racial politics depends on the landmark civil rights legislation that came out of the era. One notorious decision was Plessy v. Ferguson, the case in which the Supreme Court confirmed the constitutionality of racial separation, helping to pave the way for nearly 60 years of Jim Crow laws. Though the decision was overturned by the 1954Brown v. Board of Education decision, the de facto segregation Plessy codified continues into the present. But at the time, Plessy wasn’t deemed newsworthy — at least not by the white-dominated, partisan press. To contextualize the road to Plessy, Bob spoke with Steve Luxenberg, author of the new book, Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation."]

"Lynching in America: Confronting the Legacy of Racial Terror." 3rd ed. Equal Justice Initiative (2017)

Maddow, Rachel. "Benton Harbor's Emergency Financial Manager." Rachel Maddow Show (April 19, 2011)

Mackey, Robert. "Russia, Iran and Egypt Heckle U.S. About Tactics in Ferguson." The New York Times (August 20, 2014)

Maing, Stephen and Edwin Raymond. "'Crime + Punishment' Exposes Racial Quotas in the NYPD & Retaliation Against Officers Who Speak Out." Democracy Now (January 8, 2019) ["A group of New York Police Department officers are challenging what they call a racially charged policy of quotas for arrests and summonses. Known as the ”NYPD 12,” they risked their reputations and livelihoods to confront their superiors, fight illegal quotas and demand a more just police force. We look at a film following their story called “Crime + Punishment.” It has just been shortlisted for an Academy Award for Best Documentary. We speak with Stephen Maing, the film’s director and producer, and Lieutenant Edwin Raymond, the lead plaintiff in a lawsuit filed by the NYPD 12."]

Marty, Robin. "Four Things You Probably Don't Know About the Ferguson Protests." Truthout (August 24, 2014)

Mathias, Christopher and Carly Schwartz. "Protesters Shut Down Three New York City Bridges In Reaction To Ferguson Decision." Huffington Post (November 25, 2014)

Maté, Aaron. "'You Can Replace Property, You Can’t Replace a Life': Voices of the Unheard in the Baltimore Streets." Democracy Now (April 29, 2015)

Mayer, Danny. "Northside Gentrification." (Posted on Youtube: December 18, 2017)

McBride, Michael. ""Not Acceptable in a Civilized Society": Pastor on Ferguson Police Targeting Traumatized Youth." Democracy Now (August 20, 2014)

McGhee, Heather. "'The Sum of Us': Heather McGhee on How Racism Undercuts the American Dream for Everyone." Democracy Now (March 19, 2021) ["Amid a national reckoning with structural racism and the dangers of white supremacy, author Heather McGhee’s new book details how racism in the United States hurts not just people of color but also white people. In “The Sum of Us: What Racism Costs Everyone and How We Can Prosper Together,” McGhee details how zero-sum thinking has worsened inequality and robbed people of all stripes of the public goods and support they need to thrive. We speak with McGhee about the cost of racism, Republican voter suppression efforts and what people can accomplish when they come together in solidarity across racial lines. “Fundamentally, racism has been the most powerful tool wielded against the best of America — against American democracy, against cross-racial solidarity, against the American dream itself,” says McGhee."]

McLemee, Scott. "CLR James and African American Liberation." We Are Many (June 18, 2009)

Medina, Daniel A. "In Pakistan and Ferguson, the real risks of bringing children to protests became clear this week." Quartz (August 20, 2014)

"Michael Brown." Democracy Now (Ongoing Archive)

"Michael Brown Shooting." The Guardian (Ongoing Archive)

Miron, Jeffrey and Annie Rouse. "Harry Anslinger - America's First Drug Czar." Anslinger: The Untold Cannabis Conspiracy 1.1 (February 5, 2018) ["On the first episode 1 of Anslinger: The untold cannabis conspiracy, we discuss narcotic policies and the life of Harry Anslinger, America’s first Drug Czar, prior to his appointment as Chief and First Commissioner to the Federal Bureau of Narcotics. We also interview Harvard economist, Dr. Jeffrey Miron, about the global outlook on drugs, diseases and the economy during the early 1900s."]

Mitchell, Jerry and Dawn Porter. "Spies of Mississippi: New Film on the State-Sponsored Campaign to Defeat the Civil Rights Movement." and "PART 2: Interview with "Spies of Mississippi" Director and Reporter Jerry Mitchell." Democracy Now (February 25, 2014)

Mitchell, W.J.T. "The Trolls of Academe: Making Safe Spaces into Brave Spaces." Los Angeles Review of Books (January 5, 2018) [ Response by Horowitz with a rejoinder by Mitchell ]

Morris, Wesley. "Let’s Be Real: Let’s Be Cops, cop movies, and the shooting in Ferguson."Grantland (August 15, 2014)

Mullen, Stephen. "The Myth of Scottish Slaves." Skeptical Scot (March 4, 2016)


Munayyer, Yousef and Rebecca Vilkomerson. "Advocates: Israel’s Jewish Nation-State Law Constitutionally Enshrines Racism Against Palestinians." Democracy Now (July 23, 2018) ["A fragile ceasefire remains in effect after four Palestinians and one Israeli soldier were killed during violence Friday along the border with Gaza. During the flare-up, Israel launched dozens of strikes it said were targeted at Hamas rockets and mortars. The death of the Israeli soldier was the first since Palestinians launched weekly nonviolent protests at the border in March. Israeli forces have shot and killed at least 140 Palestinians during those protests, while wounding thousands of others. This comes as Israeli lawmakers drew condemnation Thursday for passing a law that defines Israel as the nation-state of the Jewish people and gives them the sole right to self-determination. The law declares Hebrew the country’s only official language and encourages the building of Jewish-only settlements on occupied territory as a “national value.” We get response from Yousef Munayyer, executive director of US Campaign for Palestinian Rights, and Rebecca Vilkomerson, executive director of Jewish Voice for Peace. She co-authored a new op-ed in The Independent headlined “As Jews, we reject the myth that it’s antisemitic to call Israel racist.”"]

Nelson, Alondra. "The Social Life of DNA: Racial Reconciliation and Institutional Morality." London School of Economics and Political Science (October 26, 2017) ["Alondra Nelson will discuss her book The Social Life of DNA on how claims about ancestry are marshalled together with genetic analysis in a range of social ventures. The use of genetic ancestry testing in the United States has grown exponentially since its emergence about fifteen years ago. In this same period, U.S. colleges and universities have increasingly uncovered and confronted their ties to the history of racial slavery. Although genetic ancestry tests are principally sought to provide genealogical information, these data have been marshalled into a wider range of social ventures, including the politics of remembrance and reconciliation. In this presentation, Alondra Nelson examines the recent use of genetic ancestry testing by the descendants of nearly three hundred enslaved men and women owned by Georgetown University, whom the institution’s Jesuit stewards sold to Southern plantations in 1838 in order to secure its solvency. The case of the GU 272 will be explored as a “reconciliation project”—a social endeavour in which DNA analysis is put to the use of repairing historic injury."]

Nisa, Eva. "'They Are Us': : New Zealand Mourns After Mosque Attacks Killed 50 Including Refugees & Immigrants." Democracy Now (March 19, 2019) ["Burials are beginning in New Zealand as the country mourns the loss of 50 Muslim worshipers gunned down in two mosques in Christchurch by a white supremacist Friday. It was the deadliest attack in New Zealand’s history. The worshipers killed in the Christchurch massacre came from around the world. Most of them were immigrants, or refugees who had come to New Zealand seeking safety. Six Pakistanis, four Jordanians, four Egyptians and at least three Bangladeshis are among the dead. The Palestinian Authority’s foreign ministry said that six of the victims were of Palestinian origin. We speak with Eva Nisa, a lecturer in religious studies at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand. Her recent article for Middle East Eye is titled “New Zealand has been a home to Muslims for centuries, and will remain so.”"]

Noble, Safiya. "Writing human bias into the code that runs our lives (Algorithms)." Best of the Left #1266 (April 19, 2019) ["Today we take a look at the racism, sexism and classism that is permeating the algorithmic systems that are directing more and more of our online and offline lives."]

The N Word (USA: Todd Nelson, 2004: 86 mins)

O'Donnell, Lawrence. "Rewrite: Bad police reporting by the NYTimes." The Last Word (August 20, 2014)

Okeowo, Alexis. "A Devastating, Overdue National Memorial to Lynching Victims." The New Yorker (April 26, 2018)

Oliver, John, et al. "Confronting the Legacy of the Confederacy." Best of the Left #1186 (May 29, 2018) ["Today we take a look at the legacy of the Confederacy, the monuments and white supremacy it left behind and the racial terror institutionalized in America based on upholding its values."]

Parenti, Michael. "Racism and the Ideology of Slavery." Unwelcome Guests #8 (April 29, 2000)

Partapuoli, Kari Helene. "Norway Attacks Reveal Growing Violent, Anti-Muslim Sentiment in Europe." Democracy Now (July 26, 2011)

Patrick, Robert. "Five Ferguson protesters sue police for $41.5 million over arrests." St. Louis Post Dispatch (August 28, 2014)
Pensoneau, Migizi. "Behind the Scenes of Our Tense Segment on The Daily Show." The Huffington Post (September 30, 2014)

Pierce, Charles P. "The CIA & NYPD: Perilous Insubordination in Our Democracy." The Politics Blog (December 22, 2014)

Potter, Gary. "The Ferguson Grand Jury and the Coercive State." Imagining Justice (November 28, 2014)

Pruitt, Jos. "Racist Psychology Today article claims black women are objectively less attractive than other women." Feministing (May 16, 2011)

Purnell, Derecka. "Radical Political Action." Boston Review (March 7, 2016) ["In the Black Study, Black Struggle forum, Robin D. G. Kelley advocates for a rebirth of grassroots political education. A forum contributor, Derecka Purnell, informed us that some groups of student-activists are already doing exactly that. At Harvard Law School, a group called Reclaim Harvard Law has occupied one of the school's lounges and is holding weekly political education sessions there. Purnell shared with us her list of the texts that have been circulating in the group. It reveals an investment in liberation from not only racial oppression, but from all forms of oppression, including sexual and financial. This is informed by a commitment to "intersectionality," Kimberlé Crenshaw's insight that various forms of oppression are entangled and amplify one another, and thus must be fought in concert. We present this list, in the form it was presented to us, as the current pulse of the movement and a testament to its members' brilliance."]

Saini, Angela. "Junk Science: How belief in biological racial difference pollutes the world of science, from eugenics to genetics." American Scholar (August 9, 2019) ["For our 100th episode, we welcome back science journalist Angela Saini, whose work deflates the myths we tell ourselves about science existing in an apolitical vacuum. With far-right nationalism and white supremacy on the rise around the world, pseudoscientific and pseudointellectual justifications for racism are on the rise—and troublingly mainstream. Race is a relatively recent concept, but dress it up in a white lab coat and it becomes an incredibly toxic justification for a whole range of policies, from health to immigration. It is tempting to dismiss white-supremacist cranks who chug milk to show their superior lactose tolerance, but it’s harder to do so when those in positions of power—like senior White House policy adviser Stephen Miller or pseudointellectual Jordan Peterson—spout the same rhetoric. The consequences can be more insidious, too: consider how we discuss the health outcomes for different groups of people as biological inevitabilities, not the results of social inequality. Drawing on archives and interviews with dozens of prominent scientists, Saini shows how race science never really left us—and that in 2019, scientists are as obsessed as ever with the vanishingly small biological differences between us."]

"Rage for Michael Brown." Reuters (November 25, 2014)

Ransby, Barbara. "Remembering the Overlooked Life of Eslanda Robeson, Wife of Civil Rights Legend Paul Robeson." Democracy Now (February 12, 2013)

Reilly, Ryan J. and Amanda Terkel. "Ferguson Fights For Justice Beyond Mike Brown's Death."The Huffington Post (August 24, 2014)

Rios, Edwin. "Orioles Executive on Baltimore Unrest: It's Inequality, Stupid." Mother Jones (April 28, 2015)

Roberts, Neil. "Race, Injustice, and Philosophy: An Interview with Tommie Shelby." Black Perspectives (January 2, 2018)

Roberts, Tim. "What Was also Wrong About the Claim that Andrew Gillum’s Election as Florida’s Governor 'Would Monkey This Up.'" History News Network (September 9, 2018)

Robertson, Campbell. "A Lynching Memorial Is Opening. The Country Has Never Seen Anything Like It." The New York Times (April 25, 2018)

Robin, Corey. "The Supreme Court Justice with the Most to Say." On the Media (July 31, 2020) ["Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas is hardly the quietest member of the bench. In hundreds of opinions authored during his tenure — longer than any of his present colleagues' — Thomas has elaborated upon a vision first instilled in him by a stern, business-minded grandfather and later cemented during a turbulent undergraduate education, spent protesting racial injustice, debating Black nationalist principles, and memorizing passages of Malcolm X. And despite a deliberate post-college turn toward capitalism and political futilitarianism, his original comprehensive view of America persists: our national government is incapable of bettering the lives of Black Americans, just as white Americans are forever incapable of dismantling their own racism. Still, Thomas remains baffling to some — an enigma, as some senators put it during his confirmation hearings more than twenty years ago. An analysis of Thomas's biography and jurisprudence by author and political scientist Corey Robin, The Enigma of Clarence Thomas, leaves no room for confusion. In this segment, originally aired last November, Brooke speaks with Robin about Thomas's views on criminal justice, affirmative action, capitalism, racial equality, and ultimately the fate of the nation."]

Robiou, Marcia. "A New Report Sheds Light on an International Rohingya Trafficking Network." Frontline (April 5, 2019)

Rodorff, Matthias. "Antislavery Sentiments and Experiences of African-Canadians During the Civil War Era." Slavery and Its Legacies (January 30, 2017) ["In this episode Thomas Thurston spoke with Mathias Rodorff, a PhD candidate at the University of Munich and a visiting fellow at the Gilder Lehrman Center, about his current work, which investigates why Nova Scotian newspapers paid such close attention to the contest in the United States over issues of slavery, emancipation, and equality while never considering how these issues might have played out in their province. Rodorff considers this in the context of other domestic events, like the heated debates over Nova Scotia’s role in the Canadian Confederation."]

Rollins, Rachel. "Inequality and Injustice." Open Source (June 11, 2020) ["The job at hand is coming to terms with American reality, 400 years of history and day-to-day evidence in work and wealth gaps, in health and hierarchy, in criminal injustice and scandalous policing. The charge is racism, and in a national roar of response to the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, the leading prescription seems to be anti-racism. That includes both quiet introspection and very public reordering of public-safety enforcement, for starters. Change is coming, and in a few instances like the one we’re dwelling on this hour, change has already come. Rachael Rollins got elected District Attorney two years ago for Boston and the adjoining cities of Chelsea, Winthrop, and Revere. Her campaign promise was to change the system – to de-carcerate criminal justice; to decriminalize poverty, drug disorders and mental illness; to drop prosecutions of a dozen or more petty crimes, like shoplifting and carrying drug paraphernalia."]

Roos, Jerome. "What happens in Ferguson does not stay in Ferguson." ROAR (August 24, 2014)

Root, Carl. "The Day After: Confronting Political Policing in Ferguson." Imagining Justice (November 25, 2014)

Rosenthal, Caitlin C. "How Slavery Inspired Modern Business Management." Boston Review of Books (August 20, 2018)

Rothert, Tony. "Fighting Gag Order, Ferguson Grand Juror Accuses Prosecutor of Mishandling Case & Misleading Public." Democracy Now (January 7, 2015)

Roy, Arundhati. "Capitalism: A Ghost Story" We Are Many (March 26, 2014 at The New School in NYC) ["From the poisoned rivers, barren wells, and clear-cut forests, to the hundreds of thousands of farmers who have committed suicide to escape punishing debt, to the hundreds of millions of people who live on less than two dollars a day, there are ghosts nearly everywhere you look in India. India is a nation of 1.2 billion, but the country’s 100 richest people own assets equivalent to one-fourth of India’s gross domestic product. Capitalism: A Ghost Story examines the dark side of democracy in contemporary India, and shows how the demands of globalized capitalism has subjugated billions of people to the highest and most intense forms of racism and exploitation."]

Rusert, Britt. "Introduction." Fugitive Science: Empiricism and Freedom in Early African-American Culture. New York University Press, 2017: 1-22.

Russell, Tory. ""This Country Values Property Over People": Ferguson Activist Speaks Out as Protests Spread." Democracy Now (November 26, 2014)

Sakuma, Amanda. "Women hold the front-lines of Ferguson." MSNBC (October 12, 2014)

Sánchez, Andrea Nill. "Artificial Intelligence and Immigrant Communities." Latino Rebels (March 29, 2020) ["In this episode of Latino Rebels Radio, host Julio Ricardo Varela welcomes Andrea Nill Sánchez, Executive Director of the AI Now Institute at New York University, to talk about how artificial intelligence is being used (and misused) in immigration enforcement."]

Sanyal, Mithu. "Rape: From Lucretia to #MeToo (Verso, 2019)." New Books in Psychology (December 11, 2020) ["My guest today, author Mithu Sanyal, describes the topic of rape as a ‘cultural sore spot,’ one that requires yet eludes wide conversation. Her latest book, Rape: From Lucretia to #MeToo (Verso, 2019), bravely starts this conversation. It covers the history of rape as well as of our divergent and misguided conceptions for it, and it addresses the topic’s intersection with matters of gender stereotypes and racism. We unpack these topics in our interview, along with the psychological phenomena undergirding conflicts over consent and body sovereignty. This episode will be of interest for anyone interested in the problems of sexual violence and gender bias. Mithu Sanyal is an award-winning broadcaster, academic, and author based in Dusseldorf. Her prior book, Vulva, has been translated into five languages."]

Sargent, Antwaun. "The Art of the Black Lives Matter Movement." i-d (September 11, 2015)


---. "Trump Has Incited White Supremacists & Emboldened Police to Act Outside the Law." Democracy Now (October 19, 2020) ["As the 2020 presidential campaign enters its final two weeks, we look at the past four years of the Trump presidency with investigative journalist Jeremy Scahill of The Intercept. His podcast “Intercepted” has just released the fourth chapter in a seven-part audio documentary titled “American Mythology,” which critically examines the Trump presidency and places it within a larger historical context. Scahill says Trump has empowered white supremacist vigilantes and given permission to law enforcement to act extrajudicially to enforce a racist status quo, but he cautions that “Donald Trump is not an aberration of U.S. history or some anomaly, but he’s a very overt representation of many of the absolute most violent, destructive, racist, xenophobic trends in U.S. history.”"]

---. "Trump’s Xenophobia Is Horrific, But U.S. Immigration Policy Has Always Been Racist." Democracy Now (October 19, 2020) ["In Part 2 of our discussion of the Trump era with The Intercept’s Jeremy Scahill about his new seven-part audio documentary “American Mythology,” he examines how Trump’s xenophobic immigration policies have been a “methodical, surgical operation” to make life miserable for both current and prospective immigrants, including asylum seekers fleeing violence. He also notes that while Trump’s policies have been particularly vicious, “this country has had a racist immigration policy for a very long time, and it’s bipartisan.”"]

"The Scarlet E: Unmasking America's Eviction Crisis." On the Media (June 6, 2019) ["We have an eviction epidemic in this country. We’ve had one for a long time. And in this new four-part series from On the Media, host Brooke Gladstone will seek out the why and the wherefore — in search, ultimately, of a cure. Evictions are filed over 3.7 million times a year in America — or at a rate of one every seven seconds. The eviction epidemic has bedeviled more lives than the opioid crisis and still its causes — and consequences — remain largely ignored or misunderstood. With the help of Matt Desmond and the Eviction Lab, which has compiled the largest-ever database of eviction records, our series charts a course through a thicket of contradictions and assumptions to reveal the heart of the crisis."]

Scheiber, Noam. "The St. Louis County Prosecutor Implicitly Conceded the Need for a Trial." The New Republic (November 24, 2014)

Scheindlin, Dahlia. "A Solution for Israelis & Palestinians." How Do We Fix It? #153 (2018) ["President Trump's rejection of the Iran nuclear agreement and Israeli military attacks on Iranian sites in Syria are among the latest signs of rising tensions in the Middle East. The threat of war is ever-present.
Twenty five years after the signing of the Oslo Accords, relations between the Israeli government and Palestinian Authority are at a low point. There has been no significant peace process in many years. We speak with Israeli public opinion analyst, strategic consultant and peace researcher, Dahlia Scheindlin, who is hopeful that a new peace agreement will emerge. In addition to her work with Israelis and Palestinian, she has expertise in conflict resolution in Eastern Europe and the Balkans. Dahlia is co-host of the podcast, The Tel Aviv Review.
In this episode, we discuss the proposal for a confederation between Israel and Palestine. Unlike the hard borders in a traditional two-state solution, a two-state confederation would allow for greater movement of both peoples.  While the idea has received little coverage in the international media, the confederation debate is gathering strength in Israel. The concept calls for a softer separation with more Palestinians living as non-citizens in Israel, while Jewish settlements with Israeli citizens may remain in Palestine. "]

Selod, Saher. "Forever Suspect: Racialized Surveillance of Muslim Americans in the War on Terror (Rutgers University Press, 2018)." New Books in Sociology (March 29, 2021) ["How does a specific American religious identity acquire racial meaning? What happens when we move beyond phenotypes and include clothing, names, and behaviors to the characteristics that inform ethnoracial categorization? Forever Suspect, Racialized Surveillance of Muslim Americans in the War on Terror (Rutgers University Press, 2018) provides a nuanced portrayal of the experiences of South Asian and Arab Muslims in post 9/11 America and the role of racialized state and private citizen surveillance in shaping Muslim lived experiences. Saher Selod, an Associate Professor of Sociology at Simmons University, shares with us her story of growing up in Kansas and Texas and how writing this book helped her reclaim her own racialized experiences as the children of Pakistani immigrants to the US. Saher first began this project as a doctoral student at the University of Texas at Austin. As she returned to the dissertation to craft it into a book, she realized that beyond just race, racism and racialization, surveillance was a key recurring theme for the interview respondents. In today’s conversation, we explore the nuances of gender, race and surveillance, what it means to “Fly while Muslim”, and the harmful consequences of institutional surveillance laws like “Countering Violent Extremism” (CVE) that came about during the Obama Administration. We also touch on limitations of the book, including the exclusion of Black Muslims from this specific project. Saher’s openness with which she shares how her thinking has evolved over the years since this project first began leads us to discuss the ways in which non-Black Muslim immigrants and American born Muslims enact and maintain white supremacist structures. Forever Suspect provides an important and eye opening lens for us to consider how racialized surveillance, in all dimensions and forms, the War on Terror and U.S. Empire building continues to impact Muslim communities in the U.S."]

Seller, Bakari. "'My Vanishing Country': Mass Protests Rise from 400 Years of Systemic Racism." Democracy Now (June 1, 2020) ["As mass unrest engulfs the U.S., we speak with attorney and political commentator Bakari Sellers, whose new memoir My Vanishing Country was just published. One of the central moments in the book is the Orangeburg massacre of 1968, when police opened fire on a crowd of students gathered on the campus of South Carolina State University to protest segregation at Orangeburg’s only bowling alley. When the shooting stopped, three Black students were dead, 28 students were wounded. The nine officers who opened fire that day were all acquitted. The only person convicted of wrongdoing was Bakari Sellers’s father, Cleveland Sellers, a member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, known as SNCC. He was convicted of a riot charge and spent seven months behind bars. He was pardoned in 1993. We speak with Bakari Sellers about Orangeburg, 2020 and “400 years of systemic racism” in the U.S."]

Serwer, Adam. "Democracy for Me -- But Not for Thee." On the Media (August 9, 2019) ["As revealed last week by presidential historian Tim Naftali, that snippet had for years been withheld by the National Archives — apparently to protect Reagan’s privacy, who presumably was unaware the conversation was being recorded. To Adam Serwer, staff writer at The Atlantic, [Ronald] Reagan’s remark was not only racist and condescending, but emblematic of a certain just-between-you-and-me white supremacism that persists to this day at the highest levels of government and continues to contaminate American democracy. In this segment, Bob and Adam discuss the history of excluding black and brown Americans from our system of self-governance, from the founding to the Reconstruction to the present."]

---. "Trump's White Nationalist Vanguard." The Atlantic (November 18, 2019) ["The emails of a key presidential aide show an extremist ideology influencing policy in the White House."]

Shah, Kushbu. "They Look White But Say They are Black: A Tiny Town in Ohio Wrestles with Race." The Guardian (July 25, 2019) [A clear example of how racism is much more than just skin color (although that is an obvious and easy way for immediate enforcement), that who is considered to be "white"/"non-white" has evolved over time, and racism has always had a strong economic/class (hierarchy) function designed to keep certain peoples in their "place.". Check out Barbara Field's book  Racecraft: The Soul of Inequality "Many residents in East Jackson were raised to identify as black. But what dictates race: where you live, your DNA, the history you’re taught?"]

Sicinski, Michael. "The Deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner: Documents of Barbarism."Notebook (December 9, 2014)

Simon, David. "Baltimore." The Audacity of Despair (April 27, 2015)

Singh, Nikhil Pal, with Jeremy Scahill. "Talk and Conversation." Lannan Foundation (September 26, 2018) ["Nikhil Pal Singh is an associate professor of social and cultural analysis and history at New York University and the founding faculty director of the NYU Prison Education Program. He is the author of Race and America’s Long War (2017), in which, historian Robin Kelley argues, “Singh obliterates any myth of American peace, revealing instead that the thread tying America’s past and present is long and continuous war—”hot, vicious, global, and racial.” Singh’s work helps us understand the historical sweep of racist ideology that brought us to the election of Donald Trump in 2016 and shows the connection between the election and US military defeats abroad. He writes, 'Marred by military atrocities, torture scandals, fiscal waste, toxic exposure, popular opposition, and public disgust, the US invasion of Iraq induced a regional death spiral and inspired new terrorist networks of the kind that the war was ostensibly fought to vanquish.'"]

Slavery By Another Name (PBS Documentary by Samuel Pollard, 2012: 84 minutes) ["Slavery by Another Name “resets” our national clock with a singular astonishing fact: Slavery in America didn’t end 150 years ago, with Abraham Lincoln’s 1863 Emancipation Proclamation. Based on Douglas A. Blackmon’s Pulitzer Prize-winning book, the film illuminates how in the years following the Civil War, insidious new forms of forced labor emerged in the American South, persisting until the onset of World War II."]

Sledge, Matt. "Darren Wilson Supporters Rally To Bash Media, Ferguson Protesters." The Huffington Post (August 23, 2014)

Smith, Ashley. "Lessons from Charlottesville: How to Fight and Defeat Fascism." We Are Many (August 15, 2017) ["When right wing thugs in Charlottesville feel free to harass and murder, the need for solidarity and and activism against the far right could not be more urgent. The far right is bigger and more lethal than at any time in decades. Fascists are attempting to turn the rightward swing in U.S. politics to market themselves as mainstream. From worker defense guards in the 1930's to the Deacons for Defense and other self defense organizations in the civil rights movement of the 1960's, the U.S. left has a long history of resisting right wing violence. The key to a successful strategy is the broadest possible protests and mass actions to confront the far right wherever it raises its head."]

Smith, Phillip. "NYC, Marijuana Arrest Capital of the World? Activists Rally at Bloomberg's Apartment Over Illegal, Racist Pot Arrests." AlterNet (March 30, 2012)

Soboroff, Jacob. "'Release Is Only Way to Save Lives': Migrant Families Face Separation as COVID Spreads in ICE Jails." Democracy Now (July 14, 2020)

Song, Min Hyoung. "No Witness: Warrior and the Histories of Anti-Asian Violence." Los Angeles Review of Books (March 22, 2021)

Southern Poverty Law Center  ["The SPLC is dedicated to fighting hate and bigotry and to seeking justice for the most vulnerable members of our society. Using litigation, education, and other forms of advocacy, the SPLC works toward the day when the ideals of equal justice and equal opportunity will be a reality."]

"Statement on Ferguson." Sociologists for Justice (2014)

Stevenson, Bryan. "On Challenging the Legacy of Racial Inequality in America: the Work of the Equal Justice Initiative." Slavery and Its Legacies (February 6, 2017) ["Bryan Stevenson is the founder and Executive Director of the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery, Alabama. Mr. Stevenson is a widely acclaimed public interest lawyer who has dedicated his career to helping the poor, the incarcerated and the condemned. Under his leadership, EJI has won major legal challenges eliminating excessive and unfair sentencing, exonerating innocent death row prisoners, confronting abuse of the incarcerated and the mentally ill and aiding children prosecuted as adults. Mr. Stevenson has successfully argued several cases in the United States Supreme Court and recently won an historic ruling that mandatory life-without-parole sentences for all children 17 or younger are unconstitutional. Mr. Stevenson and his staff have won reversals, relief or release for over 115 wrongly condemned prisoners on death row. Mr. Stevenson has initiated major new anti-poverty and anti-discrimination efforts that challenge the legacy of racial inequality in America, including major projects to educate communities about slavery, lynching and racial segregation. Mr. Stevenson is also a Professor of Law at the New York University School of Law."]

---. "'Talking History is Way We Liberate America': : New Memorial Honors Victims of White Supremacy." Democracy Now (May 1, 2018) ["The National Memorial for Peace and Justice opened last week in Montgomery, Alabama—a monument to victims of white supremacy in the United States. The memorial’s centerpiece is a walkway with 800 weathered steel pillars overhead, each of them naming a U.S. county and the people who were lynched there by white mobs. In addition to the memorial dedicated to the victims of lynching, its partner site, the Legacy Museum: From Enslavement to Mass Incarceration, also opened last week. For more, we speak with Bryan Stevenson, the founder and executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, the nonprofit behind the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, the country’s first-ever memorial to the victims of lynching in the United States."]

---. "'Death Penalty is Lynching's Stepson': On Slavery, White Supremacy, Prisons & More." Democracy Now (May 1, 2018) ["Extended conversation with Bryan Stevenson, the founder and executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, the nonprofit behind the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, the country’s first-ever memorial to the victims of lynching in the United States. The memorial opened last week in Montgomery, Alabama. Its centerpiece is a walkway with 800 weathered steel pillars overhead, each of them naming a U.S. county and the people who were lynched there by white mobs. The memorial’s partner site, the Legacy Museum: From Enslavement to Mass Incarceration, also opened last week. For more, we speak with Bryan Stevenson, who says that acknowledging history is crucial to facing racism today. “Everybody wants to think that if they were alive during slavery, they’d be an abolitionist,” Stevenson says. “If we’re not prepared to act today, then I don’t think we can claim that we would have acted any differently during slavery and lynching and segregation.”"]

"Survivor tries to make sense of aftermath of Norway attacks as trial continues." Public Radio International (May 7, 2012)

Taibbi, Matt. "The Police in America Are Becoming Illegitimate." Rolling Stone (Posted on Reader Supported News: December 7, 2014)

Taub, Amanda. "Seattle's former police chief speaks out on Ferguson and police militarization."Vox (August 14, 2014)

Taylor, Keeanga-Yamahtta. "A Class Rebellion: Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor on How Racism & Racial Terrorism Fueled Nationwide Anger." Democracy Now (June 1, 2020) ["In the largest nationwide uprising since the 1960s, protesters shut down cities across the United States over the weekend following the police killing of George Floyd, an African American man in Minneapolis. “These are not just repeats of past events,” says scholar Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor. “These are the consequences of the failures of this government and the political establishment … to resolve these crises.”"]

---. "Martin Luther King's Radical Anticapitalism." The Paris Review (January 15, 2018)

"Teaching the Hard History of Slavery." Southern Poverty Law Center (2018)

Teutsch, Matthew. "The Problem with Confederate Monuments in Public Spaces." Black Perspectives (July 26, 2017)

Theoharis, Jeanne. "On Rosa Parks’ 100th Birthday, Recalling Her Rebellious Life Before and After the Montgomery Bus." Democracy Now (February 4, 2013)

Thompson, A.C. "Border Agents Caught Posting Racist, Sexist Messages About Migrants & AOC in Secret Facebook Group." Democracy Now (July 3, 2019) ["Customs and Border Protection has opened an investigation into the posting of racist and xenophobic messages by current and former Border Patrol agents on a private Facebook group. More than 9,500 people are part of the group, which was exposed by ProPublica on Monday. The Facebook group is filled with racist, homophobic, anti-immigrant and misogynistic content about migrants and asylum seekers, as well as public officials like Congressmember Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who is depicted in a photoshopped image being sexually assaulted by President Trump. In another thread, members of the group made fun of a video of a man trying to carry a child through a rapid river in a plastic bag. Someone commented, “At least it’s already in a trash bag.” We speak with ProPublica reporter A.C. Thompson, who broke the story."]

---.  "Documenting Hate: New Doc Lays Bare the Violent White Supremacy that Exploded in Charlottesville." Democracy Now (August 7, 2018) ["This week marks one year since white supremacists and neo-Nazis descended on Charlottesville, Virginia, in the deadly “Unite the Right” rally to protest the city’s decision to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from a downtown park. It became the biggest and deadliest white supremacist rally in the United States in decades. We look back at the deadly rally in Charlottesville with a new documentary by Frontline PBS and ProPublica titled “Documenting Hate: Charlottesville.” We speak with A.C. Thompson, the reporter who produced the investigation, which premieres tonight on PBS."]

---. "New American Nazis: Inside the White Supremacist Movement That Fueled Pittsburgh Synagogue Shooting." Democracy Now (November 20, 2018) ["Neo-Nazis are on the rise in America. Nearly a month after a gunman killed eleven Jewish worshipers at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh, we look at the violent hate groups that helped fuel the massacre. On the same day that shooter Robert Bowers opened fire in the synagogue, a neo-Nazi named Edward Clark that Bowers had been communicating with online took his own life in Washington, D.C. The man’s brother, Jeffrey Clark, has since been arrested on weapons charges. The brothers were both linked to the violent white supremacist group Atomwaffen. We speak with A.C. Thompson, correspondent for FRONTLINE PBS and reporter for ProPublica. His investigation “Documenting Hate: New American Nazis” premieres tonight on PBSstations and online."]

---. "New Charlottesville Doc Exposes Neo-Nazi Leaders & Their Ties to U.S. Military & Weapons Contractors." Democracy Now (August 7, 2018) ["When hundreds of white supremacists arrived in Charlottesville, Virginia, for a deadly “Unite the Right” protest last August, local authorities were unprepared for the violence that terrorized the city, largely standing back during bloody encounters between white supremacists and counterprotesters. One year later, we speak with investigative reporter A.C. Thompson on his work to track down and identify white supremacists from Charlottesville and other extremist rallies across the country."]

---. "Portland Protest Shows New Far-Right Trend: Multi-ethnic Groups with Fascist Heroes Like Pinochet." Democracy Now (August 7, 2018) ["We continue our interview with A.C. Thompson, correspondent for Frontline PBS and reporter for ProPublica. His new investigation is titled “Documenting Hate: Charlottesville.” He discusses how he was there in Portland, Oregon, when anti-racist, anti-fascist protesters faced off against members of the far-right-wing group “Patriot Prayer” during a protest and counter protest Saturday. Hours into the competing protests, police officers attacked the left-wing, anti-fascist counter protesters with pepper spray and stun grenades. Portland’s police chief has ordered a review of the use of force at the protest."]

Thompson, Ahimir 'Questlove.' "Questlove on Police Racial Profiling, Hip-Hop, Michele Bachmann & Soul Train’s Lasting Influence." Democracy Now (September 2, 2013)

Thrasher, Steven W. "The Real Looting of Ferguson: Its Black Citizens Never Had a Chance to Get By." Comment is Free (August 19, 2014)

Thrasher, Steven and Graham Weatherspoon. "Calls for Calm After NYPD Union Says Mayor, Protesters Have Blood on Their Hands for Cops’ Murder." Democracy Now (December 22, 2014)

Tolson, Mike, Leah Binkovitz and St. John Barned-Smith. "Bland's image goes far beyond dash-cam video." Houston Chronicle (July 25, 2015) ["Personal videos, friends paint portrait of drive for racial unity"]

Toobin, Jeffrey. "How Not to Use a Grand Jury." The New Yorker (November 25, 2014)
Tyson, Neil deGrasse. The Sky is Not the Limit: Adventures of an Urban Astrophysicist. Amherst, NY: Prometheus Books, 2004. [excerpt published on Moyers & Co. : January 10, 2014]

Totale, R. "The Rebellion Explodes: Protests, Riots, and Clashes Grow in Response to the Murder of George Floyd." Lib.com (May 31, 2020) ["The country-wide rebellion that was kicked off by the police murder of George Floyd continues to grow, as across the US people hit the streets in solidarity. Mass demonstrations, freeway shut-downs, riots, looting, and clashes with law enforcement were widespread; as authorities rushed to call in the national guard. In many cities, large scale demonstrations that remained peaceful were also held. This round-up was originally published by It's Going Down."]

Venables, Robert. "Who Are These People?(The Onondaga Nation Encounters European Settlers)." Unwelcome Guests #302 (April 16, 2006)

Vimercati, Giovanni. "State of Denial: Japanese Relocation." Reverse Shot (May 16, 2017)

Vysotsky, Stanislaw. "Baltimore Beyond the Riot." Imagining Justice (April 29, 2015)

Walker, Alice. "30th Anniv. of "The Color Purple": Racism, Violence Against Women Are Global Issues." Democracy Now (September 28, 2012)

---. "Palestine Conditions "More Brutal" Than in U.S. South of 50 Years Ago." Democracy Now (September 28, 2012)

Walker, Frank X. "The Unghosting of Medgar Evers." WUKY (August 31, 2013)

Wallis, Victor. "13th and the Culture of Surplus Punishment." Jump Cut #58 (Spring 2018)

Walsh, Joan. "Ferguson nightmare widens: Rudy Giuliani, the NFL, and cops doubling down on their 'right' to kill." Salon (December 1, 2014)

Warren, Vincent. "'It is Officially Open Season on Black Folks': Legal Expert Decries Handling of Wilson Grand Jury." Democracy Now (November 25, 2014)

Watkins, D. "In Baltimore, We’re All Freddie Gray." The New York Times (April 29, 2015)

We the Protesters ["We, the protesters of Ferguson and beyond, in order to fulfill the democratic promise of our union, establish true and lasting justice, accord dignity and standing to everyone, center the humanity of oppressed people, promote the brightest future for our children, and secure the blessings of freedom for all black lives, do ordain and dedicate ourselves to this movement of radical liberation."]

"What Happened in Ferguson?" The New York Times (November 25, 2014)

"White Nationalism." Throughline (May 9, 2019) ["The white nationalist ideas of Madison Grant influenced Congress in the 1920s, leaders in Nazi Germany, and members of the Trump administration. This week, we share an episode we loved from It's Been A Minute with Sam Sanders that explores a throughline of white nationalism in American politics from the early 20th century to today."]

Whitman, James. "How the Nazis Used Jim Crow Laws as the Model for Their Race Laws." Moyers and Co. (October 13, 2017) ["Bill Moyers in conversation with author James Whitman about his new book Hitler’s American Model: The United States and the Making of Nazi Race Law."]

"Whose Heritage? Public Symbols of the Confederacy." Southern Poverty Law Center (April 21, 2016)

"Why Are Our Sons Gunned Down?: Parents of Black Victims of Police Killings Lead D.C. March" Democracy Now (December 15, 2014)

Wilkerson, Isabel. "Isabel Wilkerson’s Leaderless March that Remade America." Open Source (October 12, 2010) [Should they go or should they stay? That was a question millions of African Americans living in the South asked themselves in the 20th Century. For many the answer was simple. Life in the South was hard and dangerous, with lynching, Jim Crow laws, and lack of economic opportunities. From 1910 to the 1960s an estimated 6 million African Americans left the South and moved North, in what became known as 'The Great Migration.]

---. "It's More Than Racism: Isabel Wilkerson Explains America's 'Caste' System." Fresh Air (August 4, 2020)

Williams, Jr., Robert A. "Moving beyond tragedy by surviving and adapting (Native Peoples Series Part 4)." Best of the Left #1265 (April 16, 2019) ["Today we take a look at just a few of the aspects of modern life for Native Peoples that we can see as stemming from the racism and colonialism that has been endemic in post-contact America."]

Woods, Barnard. "A hundred protesters released without charges, but claims of mistreatment."City Paper (April 29, 2015)

Wood, Janee. "12 things white people can do now because Ferguson." Quartz (August 17, 2014)

Wright, Simon, et al. "Trayvon Martin & The Fight Against The New Jim Crow." We Are Many (April 11, 2012)

Yates, Ashley. "The Root is Racism in America: Ferguson Activist Speaks Out on Police Abuses After Meeting Obama." Democracy Now (December 2, 2014)

Yates, Michael D. "It's Still Slavery by Another Name." Monthly Review (May 1, 2020) ["All of these things would lead us to reject the hypothesis that white and black racism offset one another. What is more, we would get the same results even if we conducted more sophisticated tests of this hypothesis. For example, black wages are lower than those for whites if we factor out schooling, age, occupation, industry, experience, region, and whatever else we think influences wages. That is, if we look at two groups of workers equal in all respects (same schooling, experience, and so on), the black group will have a lower average wage than the white group. The same result would hold for whatever variable we considered—prison sentences, unemployment, life expectancies, and all the others mentioned above. We are left with an inescapable conclusion. Being black, in and of itself, is a grave economic and social disadvantage, while being white confers considerable advantage. That this is true today, 155 years after the end of the Civil War, after three constitutional amendments, the great civil rights movement, a large number of civil rights laws, and lord knows how many college courses and sensitivity training sessions is testament to the power and tenacity of racist social structures."]

Yglesias, Matthew. "Rudy Giuliani says Obama and black leaders incite 'anti-police hatred,'" Vox (December 21, 2014)

Yuen, Nancy Wang. "Reel Inequality." This is Not a Pipe (December 7, 2017) ["Nancy Wang Yuen discusses her book Reel Inequality: Hollywood Actors and Racism with Chris Richardson. She is an Associate Professor and the Chair of the Sociology Department at Biola University. She is the author of Reel Inequality: Hollywood Actors and Racism (2016), the first book to examine the barriers actors of color face in Hollywood and how they creatively challenge stereotypes. Along with a team of researchers, she pioneered the first study of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders on television (2005/2006) and the 2017 study, Tokens on the Small Screen: Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in Prime Time and Streaming Television. Dr. Yuen is an expert speaker on race and media, appearing on BBC World TV, NPR and The Washington Post. "]

Zirin, Dave. "St. Louis Rams Players Tell the World That #BlackLivesMatter." Edge of Sports (December 1, 2014)

Zimbardo, Philip. "The Psychology of Evil Inside of Trump's Concentration Camps." The Chauncey DeVega Show #255 (October 10, 2019) ["Philip Zimbardo is one of the world's leading authorities on the psychology of cruelty, groupthink, and evil. Most famous for the 1971 Stanford Prison Experiment, Dr. Zimbardo has written dozens of books and articles including the powerful and disturbing book The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil.  Dr. Zimbardo explains how America under Donald Trump is fully devolving into a state of violence, authoritarianism, and cruelty and the many ways that the Trump regime encourages thuggery against nonwhite immigrants, migrants, and refugees by law enforcement and others. Dr. Zimbardo also highlights the connections between his infamous Stanford Prison Experiment and the evil taking place inside of Donald Trump’s concentration camps. Chauncey tells some harsh truth about how the American corporate news media, many members of the Democratic Party, and too many average Americans were in denial for too long about the fascist white supremacist threat embodied by the Trump regime – and which is now fully obvious and naked in the president’s and his handlers’ recent declaration that he is a king who is above the law and cannot be impeached for any reason. Chauncey also shares his thoughts about politics of the great new film Joker and its damning indictment of neoliberalism, the culture of cruelty, and gangster capitalism."]

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The Joe Rogan Experience #1419. Daryl Davis is an R&B and blues musician, activist, author, actor and bandleader. He also is the author of "Klan-destine Relationships: A Black Man's Odyssey in the Ku Klux Klan".























Framing the Picture: Perspectives on Islamophobia in American Sniper and The Reluctant Fundamentalist from Matt Marlin on Vimeo.











Ferguson Speaks: A Communique From Ferguson from FitzGibbon Media on Vimeo.








American Hate Documentary from News21 on Vimeo.

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