Tuesday, April 12, 2022

Arrival (USA: Denis Villeneuve, 2016)

 





Arrival (USA: Denis Villeneuve, 2016: 116 mins)

Adams, Amy, et al. "Watch Isabelle Huppert, Emma Stone, Amy Adams & More Discuss Acting in 50-Minute Roundtable."  Film Stage (January 30, 2017) [" Isabelle Huppert (Elle), Emma Stone (La La Land), Amy Adams (Arrival), Natalie Portman (Jackie), Naomie Harris (Moonlight), Annette Bening (20th Century Women), and Taraji P. Henson (Hidden Figures)."]

Art of the Title. "Know Your 2017 Below-the-Line Oscar Nominees." The Film Stage (January 30, 2017) ["The major below-the-line categories are Cinematography, Production Design, Sound Editing/Mixing, Visual Effects, Costume Design, and Makeup and Hairstyling . On the best productions (including those that the Academy labels Best Picture), the work of these crucial visual elements often blend together so seamlessly that it's hard to pick their creators' work.Thankfully, Art of The Film has created a series of supercuts called Oscars in One Minute that isolate the work of these artists so we can fully recognize their importance and beauty within each respective production."]

Buckley, Cara. "Denis Villeneuve of Arrival Leans Into Strong Heroines." The New York Times (November 13, 2016)

Cassidy, Brendan, J.D. Duran and Richard Newby. "Arrival, Top 3 "Thinking" Sci-Fi Movies, The Deathly Hallows Part 2 ." InSession Film (November 15, 2016)

Chiang, Ted. "Story of Your Life." (Original novella published in 1998 in Starlight 2 that the film is adapted from)

Desowitz, Bill. " How Composer Jóhann Jóhannsson Found a New Musical Language for Denis Villeneuve’s Arrival." IndieWire (November 21, 2016)

Eggert, Brian. "Arrival (2016)." Deep Focus Review (November 11, 2016)

Jones, Matthew. "Arrival (2016): Will We Understand Aliens When (If) They Arrive?" Philosophy in Film (December 18, 2019)

Kermode, Mark. "Arrival: A Poetic Vision of Contact With Aliens." The Guardian (November 13, 2016)

Koski, Genevieve, et al. "Contact / Arrival. Pt. 1." The Next Picture Show (November 29, 2016) ["This week, we look to the skies to consider two films about the difficulty of communication between worlds, and the inward journeys involved in looking to the stars. Inspired by Denis Villeneuve’s new ARRIVAL, we begin with an in-depth discussion of an earlier film with which it shares many thematic and narrative elements: Robert Zemeckis' 1997 Carl Sagan adaptation CONTACT. We consider the film’s ambition, dissect its blockbuster qualities, and try to determine what makes this unwieldy, emotional movie work so well, almost despite itself. (Spoiler: It’s mostly Jodie Foster.)"]

---. "Contact / Arrival, Pt. 2." The Next Picture Show (December 1, 2016) ["Our conversation about movies about talking to aliens moves to the present with Denis Villeneuve’s new ARRIVAL, which hits many of the same narrative points as CONTACT, but points them in a different emotional direction. We talk about our reactions to the newer film, and how its ideas about science, communication, and emotion compare with CONTACT’s."]

Laczkowski, Jim, et al. "Denis Villeneuve." The Director's Club #140 (December 17, 2017) ["Now Playing Network Master of Ceremonies (and Director's Club founder) Jim Laczkowski joins us for this episode which has us looking at the films of French Canadian filmmaker Denis Villeneuve! With Jim's help, we look at how Villeneuve brings his unique combination of thoughtfulness, pathos, family focus, and strangeness to dramas, genre thrillers, and films across the sci-fi spectrum. Includes lots of spiders and one talking fish."]

Lane, Anthony. "The Consuming Fervor of Arrival." The New Yorker (November 14, 2016)

Mayer, Sophie. "Girl Power: Back to the Future of Feminist Science Fiction with Into the Forest and Arrival." Film Quarterly 70.3 (Spring 2017): 32-42.

Muller, and Nate Zoebl. "Arrival (2016)." Psycho Drive-In (November 13, 2016)

Roark, David. "Alien and Time: The Philosophy of Arrival." Balder & Dash (December 8, 2016)

Statt, Nick. "How the short story that inspired Arrival helps us interpret the film’s major twist." The Verge (November 16, 2016)

StudioBinder. "Denis Villeneuve & His Cinema of Ambiguity — Directing Styles Explained." (Posted on Youtube: April 6, 2020) ["Denis Villeneuve movies are made to confuse you. At every opportunity — in the story, in the cinematography, editing, and music, Villeneuve wants to keep you guessing. Watching Denis Villeneuve movies is to be placed in an environment of uncertainty. And that’s what makes them so interesting. In films like Enemy, Prisoners, Polytechnique, Blade Runner 2049, and Arrival, Villeneuve consistently creates awe and wonder with images and sounds we’ve never seen before. In Enemy, Adam (Jake Gyllenhaal) must confront the possibility that he is more than a single person. In Sicario, Kate (Emily Blunt) is pushed into the world of drug cartels by a tight-lipped company man (Josh Brolin) and a near-silent assassin (Benicio Del Toro). In Prisoners, Keller (Hugh Jackman) ventures into murky moral territory to find his kidnapped daughter. In Arrival, Louise (Amy Adams) and Ian (Jeremy Renner) are tasked with bridging the communication gap between beings from another dimension. In all these movies, the characters find themselves in new worlds without answers. In this video, we’ve cracked the code on Villeneuve’s love of ambiguity and we explain how his directing style works across 7 areas of focus including sound, color, production design, and more. Villeneuve creates movies that can be enigmatic but there’s no denying that he is a film artist in complete control of his medium. If you’re studying directing, cinematography, editing, or pursuing ANY career in filmmaking, there are a ton of lessons to be learned from Denis Villeneuve. This is the ultimate breakdown of Denis Villeneuve’s directing style."]












 Denis Villeneuve Through Glass || Video Essay from Mikolaj Kacprzak on Vimeo.









 Video Essay #6 - Words and Love in Arrival from Lukas Grevis on Vimeo.

















































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