Saturday, June 30, 2018

Dialogic Cinephilia - June 30, 2018

Accomando, Beth. "Remembering Drive-Ins." Cinema Junkie 101 (December 2, 2016)

Allen, Danielle, et al. "What is Education For?" Boston Review (May 9, 2016)

Johnson, Walter, et al. "To Remake the World: Slavery, Racial Capitalism, and Justice." Boston Review (February 20, 2018)

Kelley, Robin D.G. "What Did Cedric Robinson Mean by Racial Capitalism?" Boston Review (January 12, 2017)

Manne, Kate, et al. "The Logic of Misogyny." Boston Review (July 11, 2016)\





Nakhnikian, Elise. "Interview: Toni Collette on Getting Maniacal for Hereditary." Slant (June 7, 2018)





Thompson, Brian. "Hal." Film Threat (June 6, 2018)

"Teaching the Hard History of Slavery." Southern Poverty Law Center (2018)

Wong, Felicia. "California Today, America Tomorrow." Boston Review (May 30, 2018) ["Political lessons from the state of resistance."]





Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Dialogic Cinephilia - June 26, 2018

Beauchamp, Scott. "War Games: The Cozy Relationship Between Perpetual War and Total Entertainment." The Baffler #39 (May 2018)

Bishop, Bryan. "Phantom Thread’s Oscar-winning costume designer on how to tell stories with couture." The Verge (March 4, 2018)





Friedland, Adam, et al. "Respect." Chapo Trap House #222 (June 24, 2018) [A discussion of the mind-blowing awfulness of the film Gotti and why it is a film for Trump'merica.]

"Global Peace Index 2018 Snapshot." Institute for Economics & Peace (2018) 

Ross, Alex. "The Frankfurt School Knew Trump Was Coming." The New Yorker (December 5, 2016)

Smith, Julia. "What is Mise-en-Scène?: Part One - Setting and Costume." Film Inquiry (May 4, 2016)

---. "What is Mise-en-Scene?: Part Two - Cinematography." Film Inquiry (May 6, 2016)











Sunday, June 24, 2018

Songs for My Deer-Wolf (Part 2)


1) Of Montreal
It's Different for Girls

2) Van Halen
Intruder/(Oh) Pretty Woman

3) The Beatles
I Want You (She's So Heavy)
Something

4) Sonic Youth
Bull in the Heather
Dirty Boots

5) Blitzen Trapper
Furr
Sleepytime in the Western World

6) Midnight Oil
Beds are Burning
Dreamworld

7) Death
Let the World Turn
Politicians in My Eye

8) The Dead Milkmen/Ramones
Punk Rock Girl
Sheena is a Punk Rocker

9) Belly
Feed the Tree

10) Bonnie Raitt/Lowell George/John Hammond/Freebo & Bonnie Raitt/Aaron Neville/Greg Allman
Can't Find My Way Home

11) Mother Love Bone/Chris Cornell
Man of Golden Words
Seasons

12) Zap Mama & Michael Franti/Michael Franti & Spearhead
Poetry Man
Life is Better With You

13) Rising Appalachia
Medicine
Swoon
Resilient

14) XTC
Dear God

15) Sturgill Simpson
All Around You
Call to Arms

16) Chris Stapleton
Midnight Train to Memphis
Outlaw State of Mind

17) Mamas and Papas
California Dreaming
Dedicate to the One I Love

18) Joan Jett
Crimson and Clover
Do You Wanna Touch Me (There)

19) Divinyls
I Touch Myself

20) Coleman Hawkins
Body and Soul


























Saturday, June 23, 2018

Dialogic Cinephilia - June 23, 2018





Durkin, Sean. "Martha Marcy May Marlene (2011)." Captive Eye #6 (February 4, 2012)

Lovelock, James. "How to Think About Science (Part 6)." Ideas (February 13, 2015) ["Forty-years ago British scientist James Lovelock put forward the first elements of what he would come to call the Gaia theory. Named for the ancient Greek goddess of the earth, it held that the earth as a whole functions as a self-regulating system. At first many biologists scoffed. Today, Lovelock's ideas are more widely accepted, even in circles where he was initially scorned. But even as he has been winning scientific honours, James Lovelock has been growing more pessimistic about the prospects for contemporary civilization. In this episode David Cayley presents a profile of James Lovelock. It tells the story of a career in science that began a long time ago."]



Maher, Michael. "How Roger Deakins Shot and Lit Blade Runner 2049." The Beat (October 16, 2017)





Smalley, Gregory J. "Keyhole (2011)." 366 Weird Movies #147 (July 3, 2013)








The Secret Poppo Trailer from Zach Harris on Vimeo.














Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Dialogic Cinephilia - June 20, 2018

Bell, Derrick. "Looking Up From the Bottom of the Well." The UO Channel (February 15, 2018) ["His lecture discusses modern day constitutional dilemmas arising from the clash between fundamentally important free speech principles and the potential harms of speech."]

Bryan Stevenson: Lawyer/Equal Justice Initiative/The National Memorial for Peace and Justice Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

D., Margo and Margo P. "The Exorcist." Book vs Movie (December 8, 2017)
["... 1971 novel The Exorcist written by the very interesting William Peter Blatty. Based on a true-ish story about a boy possessed by a demon in the 1950s Blatty changed some of the key details to create this fiction classic. Director William Friedkin in 1973 just came off an incredible spate of box office successes including 1971’s The French Connection giving him an Academy Award for Best Director. The Exorcist became the biggest financial success of his career but turned out to be something of a curse as well."]

"Joy Harjo." UO Channel #698 (February 15, 2018) ["Joy Harjo, an enrolled member of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, is a poet, musician, and author. She is the Professor and Chair of Excellence at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. Harjo discusses and reads her poetry. Her eight books of poetry include the recent Conflict Resolution for Holy Beings, How We Became Human-New and Selected Poems: 1975–2001, and The Woman Who Fell From the Sky. Her memoir Crazy Brave, was published in 2012."]

Klein, Naomi, et al. "Hurricane Maria laid bare the colonialism and capitalism in Puerto Rico ​." Best of the Left #1190 (June 15, 2018) ["Today we take a look at the high toll Puerto Rico is paying, in both money and lives, for the triple disasters of colonialism, Hurricane Maria and disaster capitalism."]

Leopold, Aldo. "Thinking Like a Mountain." (Originally published in Sand County Almanac in 1949: posted on Eco-Action)














Monday, June 18, 2018

Bryan Stevenson: Lawyer/Equal Justice Initiative/The National Memorial for Peace and Justice (Ongoing Archive)

Biography:

New York University - School of Law

Website

Wikipedia page

Activism/Work/Writings:

Adams, Tim. "Bryan Stevenson: America's Mandela." The Guardian (February 1, 2015) ["Bryan Stevenson has devoted his life to exposing racial bias in the US penal system, with cases including a 13-year-old boy sentenced to life and numerous wrongful death row convictions. Tim Adams meets him at his Alabama HQ."]

Capeheart, Jonathan. "Bryan Stevenson wants us to confront our country’s racial terrorism and then say, ‘Never again.’" Washington Post (April 24, 2018)

Equal Justice Initiative ["The Equal Justice Initiative is committed to ending mass incarceration and excessive punishment in the United States, to challenging racial and economic injustice, and to protecting basic human rights for the most vulnerable people in American society."]

Landrieu, Mitch, et al. "Confronting the Legacy of the Confederacy." Best of the Left #1186 (May 29, 2018) ["Today we take a look at the legacy of the Confederacy, the monuments and white supremacy it left behind and the racial terror institutionalized in America based on upholding its values."]

"Lynching in America: Confronting the Legacy of Racial Terror." 3rd ed. Equal Justice Initiative (2017)

McWilliams, James. " Bryan Stevenson on What Well-Meaning White People Need to Know About Race." Pacific Standard (February 6, 2018)

The National Memorial for Peace and Justice ["More than 4400 African American men, women, and children were hanged, burned alive, shot, drowned, and beaten to death by white mobs between 1877 and 1950. Millions more fled the South as refugees from racial terrorism, profoundly impacting the entire nation. Until now, there has been no national memorial acknowledging the victims of racial terror lynchings. On a six-acre site atop a rise overlooking Montgomery, the national lynching memorial is a sacred space for truth-telling and reflection about racial terror in America and its legacy."]

Stevenson, Bryan. "A Presumption of Guilt." The New York Review of Books (July 13, 2017)

---. "'Death Penalty is Lynching's Stepson': On Slavery, White Supremacy, Prisons & More." Democracy Now (May 1, 2018) ["Extended conversation with Bryan Stevenson, the founder and executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, the nonprofit behind the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, the country’s first-ever memorial to the victims of lynching in the United States. The memorial opened last week in Montgomery, Alabama. Its centerpiece is a walkway with 800 weathered steel pillars overhead, each of them naming a U.S. county and the people who were lynched there by white mobs. The memorial’s partner site, the Legacy Museum: From Enslavement to Mass Incarceration, also opened last week. For more, we speak with Bryan Stevenson, who says that acknowledging history is crucial to facing racism today. “Everybody wants to think that if they were alive during slavery, they’d be an abolitionist,” Stevenson says. “If we’re not prepared to act today, then I don’t think we can claim that we would have acted any differently during slavery and lynching and segregation.”"]

---. "One Lawyer's Fight For Young Blacks And 'Just Mercy.'" Fresh Air (October 20, 2014)

---. "'Talking History is Way We Liberate America': : New Memorial Honors Victims of White Supremacy." Democracy Now (May 1, 2018) ["The National Memorial for Peace and Justice opened last week in Montgomery, Alabama—a monument to victims of white supremacy in the United States. The memorial’s centerpiece is a walkway with 800 weathered steel pillars overhead, each of them naming a U.S. county and the people who were lynched there by white mobs. In addition to the memorial dedicated to the victims of lynching, its partner site, the Legacy Museum: From Enslavement to Mass Incarceration, also opened last week. For more, we speak with Bryan Stevenson, the founder and executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, the nonprofit behind the National Memorial for Peace and Justice, the country’s first-ever memorial to the victims of lynching in the United States."]

Toobin, Jeffrey. "The Legacy of Lynching on Death Row." The New Yorker (August 22, 2016) ["In Alabama, Bryan Stevenson is saving inmates from execution and memorializing the darkest episodes of America’s past."]










Dialogic Cinephilia - June 18, 2018

Beck, Ulrich and Bruno Latour. "How To Think About Science (Part 5)." Ideas (February 11, 2015) ["Few people ever apply a name that sticks to an entire social order, but sociologist Ulrich Beck is one of them. In 1986 in Germany he published Risk Society, and the name has become a touchstone in contemporary sociology. Among the attributes of Risk Society is the one he just mentioned: science has become so powerful that it can neither predict nor control its effects. It generates risks too vast to calculate. In the era of nuclear fission, genetic engineering and a changing climate, society itself has become a scientific laboratory. In this episode, Ulrich Beck talks about the place of science in a risk society. Later in the hour you'll hear from another equally influential European thinker, Bruno Latour, the author of We Have Never Been Modern. He will argue that our very future depends on overcoming a false dichotomy between nature and culture."]

Cook, Jonathan. "How the Corporate Media Enslave Us to a World of Illusions." Counterpunch (June 15, 2018)

Feldman, David. "The Meanings of Antisemitism." Backdoor Broadcasting Company (February 13, 2017) ["Antisemitism has figured in British political debates in the last year as never before. In this lecture, David Feldman examines the changing meanings of antisemitism since the term was first coined. He reveals a new history of the Jews’ struggle for equality from the late-nineteenth century and explains why the politics of antisemitism today generate so much controversy. David Feldman is Director of the Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism and also a Professor of History at Birkbeck, University of London. He is currently writing an intellectual and political history of the concept of antisemitism in Britain from its introduction in the 1880s to the present."]

Gladwell, Malcolm. "Carlos Doesn't Remember." Revisionist History 1.4 (ND) ["Carlos is a brilliant student from South Los Angeles. He attends an exclusive private school on an academic scholarship. He is the kind of person the American meritocracy is supposed to reward. But in the hidden details of his life lies a cautionary tale about how hard it is to rise from the bottom to the top—and why the American school system, despite its best efforts, continues to leave an extraordinary amount of talent on the table."]

Landrieu, Mitch, et al. "Confronting the Legacy of the Confederacy." Best of the Left #1186 (May 29, 2018) ["Today we take a look at the legacy of the Confederacy, the monuments and white supremacy it left behind and the racial terror institutionalized in America based on upholding its values."]

Paths of Glory (USA: Stanley Kubrick, 1957) Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

Scott, Debra Leigh. "Here's How Higher Education Was Destroyed in 5 Basic Steps." Alternet (June 2, 2018)

Simon, David. "Under the Influence: Paths of Glory." (Posted on Vimeo: May 2018) ["In this episode of Under the Influence, the creator of THE WIRE and THE DEUCE talks about Stanley Kubrick’s war masterpiece and how its narrative and political complexity has inspired his own work."]










Saturday, June 16, 2018

Paths of Glory (USA: Stanley Kubrick, 1957)






Paths of Glory (USA: Stanley Kubrick, 1957: 88 mins)

Beyl, Cameron. "The Directors Series: Stanley Kubrick, Pts. 1-5." The Film Stage (February 11, 2015)

Dirks, Tim. "Paths of Glory (1957)." FilmSite (No Date)

Ebert, Roger. "Great Movie: Paths of Glory." Roger Ebert (February 25, 2005)

Ehrenstein, David. "Paths of Glory." The Current (June 25, 1989)

Koski, Genevieve, et al. "Wonder Woman / Paths of Glory, Pt. 1." The Next Picture Show #80 (June 13, 2017) ["Patty Jenkins’ new WONDER WOMAN takes World War I as its setting, opening up a host of comparisons to a much earlier, much different cinematic vision that looks to the Great War to uncover the best and worst of humanity: Stanley Kubrick’s 1957 anti-war drama PATHS OF GLORY. In this half of the discussion, we focus on PATHS OF GLORY, marveling at its efficiency and technical achievement — and at how both contribute to the film’s delicate but scathing unilateral indictment of the military system. "]

---. "Wonder Woman / Paths of Glory, Pt. 2." The Next Picture Show #81 (June 15, 2017) ["We return to the battlefields of WWI to talk over Patty Jenkins’ new WONDER WOMAN, both on its own and as it relates to Stanley Kubrick’s PATHS OF GLORY. After discussing what worked and didn’t work in WONDER WOMAN, we bring in the Kubrick film to discuss how these two stories approach themes of leadership and the military, as well as their views of the Great War specifically and all war in general."]

Naremore, James. "Paths of Glory: “We Have Met the Enemy . . .” The Current (October 25, 2010)

Simon, David. "Under the Influence: Paths of Glory." (Posted on Vimeo: May 2018) ["In this episode of Under the Influence, the creator of THE WIRE and THE DEUCE talks about Stanley Kubrick’s war masterpiece and how its narrative and political complexity has inspired his own work."]

Uhlich, Keith. "Great Directors: Stanley Kubrick." Senses of Cinema (May 2002)