Friday, February 23, 2018

Dialogic Cinephilia - February 23, 2018

Bernish, Claire. "Government's Own Data Shows That U.S. Interfered in 81 Foreign Elections." Mint Press (March 22, 2017) ["Ask an average American who makes a habit of following government-mouthpiece corporate media about interference in national elections and you’ll likely elicit a nebulous response concerning Russian hackers and a plan to install Donald Trump in the White House — but you probably won’t hear a single syllable pertaining to United States government’s actual attempts to do the same."]






Dyson, Jake. "The Dreamers (2003)." Film Matters (February 20, 2018)





Hathaway, Andrew and Courtney Small. "The Caveman's Valentine." Changing Reels #2 (September 9, 2016) ["Kasi Lemmons’ 2001 thriller The Caveman’s Valentine. The film follows a homeless man, Romulus (Samuel L. Jackson), who was once a promising composer but now lives in a cave in New York City. When the frozen body of a young man appears in a tree near his dwelling, the paranoid schizophrenic Romulus ignores the police’s assessment, of it being an accidental death, and embarks on a quest to find the killer."]





MacFarlane, Steve. "Unsane." Slant (February 21, 2018)





Head, Stephen Slaughter and David Kleiler. "Jerzy Skolimowski’s Deep End (1970)." Captive Eye #5 (January 20, 2012) ["Jerzy Skolimowski’s darkly disturbing, DEEP END (1970), which deals with a teenager’s obsessive love for an elusive older woman."]






Merrill, Tim, Bernard Stickwell and Wendy. "Beware of Mr. Baker." See Hear #12 (December 16, 2014) ["2013 documentary directed by Jay Bulger, “Beware of Mr Baker”, directed by Jay Bulger. Ginger Baker was a force of nature in the drumming world. He was admired for the extra helping of drum talent nature had provided him with, but this is not a man who puts up with nonsense – and his bullshit detector is up higher than most. It could be said that his bottle with the milk of human kindness went rancid before he had a chance to drink it. Tune in as the gang discusses Ginger’s life, how the director put his life in danger interviewing him, and whether the scientific evidence that all drummers are crotchety old bastards is accurate (NONSENSE….AND I’LL THRASH ANYONE WHO SAYS OTHERWISE)."]





"Private Corporation May be Sued for Role in Abu Ghraib Torture, Judge Rules." Center for Constitutional Rights (February 21, 2018)

"'The Time to Act Is Now': Florida School Shooting Survivors Confront Trump, Rubio on Gun Control." Democracy Now (February 22, 2018) ["“The time to act is now.” That’s the message of survivors of last week’s school shooting in Florida. On Wednesday, the nation witnessed grieving students, parents and teachers powerfully confront the president and lawmakers over gun control in pointed—and often tense—televised exchanges. The day began with students across the United States—from Minnesota to Colorado to Arizona—walking out of class to demand stricter gun laws. Meanwhile, survivors of the shooting descended on the Florida state Capitol in Tallahassee to demand lawmakers pass legislation addressing gun violence before the legislative session ends. In the afternoon, President Trump—along with Vice President Mike Pence and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos—hosted a listening session with survivors of recent shootings, including students at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. Wednesday evening, survivors of the massacre at Stoneman Douglas High School sparred with politicians during a town hall hosted by CNN."]








Ryan Coogler's 2009 short film Locks:
Locks from Ryan Coogler on Vimeo.



Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Dialogic Cinephilia - February 20, 2018

My first time participating on a podcast episode ... it is great way to experience film/s through dialogic engagement (the four participants were in Australia, South Korea, UK and America). See Hear podcast is one of the best podcasts out there (their focus is music & film - the hosts are all experts on this subject) I highly recommend browsing their archives: See Hear Episode #49: Desperate Man Blues and Vinyl ["There are two sides to every story. We at See Hear HQ decide to look at both sides of the contentious question as to whether record collectors (and by extension, collectors of any physical item) are archivists or hoarders. Tim, Bernard and Maurice are joined by Professor Michael Benton from Bluegrass Community College in Lexington, Kentucky for episode 49 of See Hear to talk about two films that explore record collection from two very different angles. Australian filmmaker Edward Gillan’s documentary from 2003, “Desperate Man Blues” is a snapshot of the record collecting activities of Joe Bussard from Maryland. Bussard has been collecting old country, blues and jazz 78s from the 1920s through to the 1950s. At the time of filming, he had anything from 15000 to 20000 records. His knowledge of what we currently call Americana is unsurpassed. He has a genuine joy in listening to and sharing the music he has spent a lifetime collecting. On the other side of the coin, Toronto documentarian Alan Zweig’s first feature length film, Vinyl puts himself and many other record collectors under the spotlight to ask what prompts them to “accumulate” records. Zweig’s contention is that the music takes a backseat to the gathering of records – all for the sake of the hunt. He tells many of his interview subjects that they (including himself) cannot form meaningful relationships with others, and so record collecting manifests itself as a substitute for human interaction. Far from flattering. Is this film just cheap therapy for Zweig or is he just playing devil’s advocate to get discussion going? The crew discuss the different approach taken to the subject matter between the films, as well as how close to home these films (Vinyl in particular) may have hit. You may collect DVDs, model aeroplanes, matchboxes…….the ideals of historical preservation vs accumulation for its own sake still hold. Should we judge? Tune in for what we believe to be a fascinating and robust discussion."]


Berman, Judy. "Black Panther Movie: What You Should Read After Watching the Boundary-Breaking Film." The New York Times (February 20, 2018)






Bursztynski, Maurice, et al. "Mystery Train." See Hear #10 (October 20, 2014) ["This time around, Tim has picked Jim Jarmusch’s ensemble cast anthology film of 1989, Mystery Train including Steve Buscemi, Nicoletta Brasschi, and Screaming Jay Hawkins. Three stories, one hotel in the one and only Memphis. We discuss whether this actually qualifies as a music film, Memphis the iconic town versus the ordinary Memphis displayed in this film, Elvis versus Carl Perkins, and the nineties independent film movement."]

---. "Suburbia." See Hear #11 (November 18, 2014) ["This month, it’s Bernie’s pick for a film to discuss, and he’s gone for 1984 film, Suburbia directed by Penelope Spheeris and produced by Roger Corman. It’s a disaffected teenagers story, but rather than just being another tale of misunderstood youth versus adults who “just don’t understand us”, there are other layers to this. There’s even a case to state that PT Anderson may have been influenced by this for Boogie Nights. How so? Tune in and find out. What’s the music connection? The music and energy of punk."]

Hattingh, Shawn. "Not a Matter of If, but When. Monthly Review (February 13, 2018)





Head, Stephen Slaughter and David Kleiler. "The Night of the Hunter (1955)." Captive Eye #4 (December 3, 2011)

History  Dialogic Cinephilia  (Ongoing Archive)

Liu, Rebecca. "On Andrey Zvyagintsev’s Loveless and the Casual Cruelty of Modern Love." Another Gaze (February 16, 2018)

"Parkland High School Shooting Survivor Emma Gonzalez’s Powerful Speech Demanding Gun Control." Democracy Now (February 19, 2018) ["In Florida, as funerals continue for the 17 people killed in at the Stoneman Douglas High School in Broward County, Florida, survivors of the school shooting have launched an unprecedented youth-led movement to demand gun control. At a rally on Saturday, survivors of the school shooting demanded politicians stop accepting money from the National Rifle Association. For more, we broadcast the full speech of Emma Gonzalez, a senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School."]

Vaneigem, Raoul. "The Resistance to Christianity. The Heresies at the Origins of the 18th Century." (1993: archived on the Anarchist Library)


Oceanum pacificus meus et mater est & minorum omnium aqua rivi sunt siblings














History (Ongoing Archive)

[Personal, collective, social, political, critical and reflective -- also memory, remembering, biography and autobiography]





"60 Words." Radiolab (April 18, 2014) ["This hour we pull apart one sentence, written in the hours after September 11th, 2001, that has led to the longest war in U.S. history. We examine how just 60 words of legal language have blurred the line between war and peace. In the hours after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, a lawyer sat down in front of a computer and started writing a legal justification for taking action against those responsible. The language that he drafted and that President George W. Bush signed into law - called the Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) - has at its heart one single sentence, 60 words long. Over the last decade, those 60 words have become the legal foundation for the "war on terror." In this collaboration with BuzzFeed, reporter Gregory Johnsen tells us the story of how this has come to be one of the most important, confusing, troubling sentences of the past 12 years. We go into the meetings that took place in the chaotic days just after 9/11, speak with Congresswoman Barbara Lee and former Congressman Ron Dellums about the vote on the AUMF. We hear from former White House and State Department lawyers John Bellinger & Harold Koh. We learn how this legal language unleashed Guantanamo, Navy Seal raids and drone strikes. And we speak with journalist Daniel Klaidman, legal expert Benjamin Wittes and Virginia Senator Tim Kaine about how these words came to be interpreted, and what they mean for the future of war and peace."]

Abu-Jamal, Mumia and Michael Parenti. "Created Unequal (Law, Money and Mumia Abu-Jamal)." Unwelcome Guests #6 (April 12, 2000)

Ahmed, Nafeez, Keith Allen and Sibel Edmonds. "Unlawful Killing (Secrets of the UK and US Establishments)." Unwelcome Guests #680 (February 8, 2014)

Ali, Mostafa and Hani Shukrallah. "What Happened to the Egyptian Revolution?" We Are Many (June 2013)

Ali, Tariq. "The Rotten Heart of Europe." Unwelcome Guests #637 (January 5, 2013)

---. "Turning Points in the History of Imperialism." Law and Disorder Radio (Decenber 31, 2013)


Alperovitz, Gal. "'Mr. Boston': Meet the Man Who Secretly Helped Daniel Ellsberg Leak Pentagon Papers to the Press." Democracy Now (February 2, 2018) ["Historian Gar Alperovitz has revealed for the first time the key role he and a handful of other activists played in helping whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg leak to journalists the Pentagon Papers—a 7,000-page classified history outlining the true extent of U.S. involvement in Vietnam. Daniel Ellsberg told The New Yorker the secret role this group played was so crucial in releasing the Pentagon Papers that he gave them a code name: “The Lavender Hill Mob.” Alperovitz went by the alias “Mr. Boston.” Ellsberg told The New Yorker, “Gar took care of all the cloak-and-dagger stuff.” We speak to historian and political economist Gar Alperovitz about why he is going public now."]

Anderson, C. W. "Print Culture 101: A Cheat Sheet and Syllabus." The Atlantic (August 18, 2010)

Appiah, Kwame Anthony. "How To Make a Moral Revolution." Open Source (November 12, 2010)

"Arc of Justice Teacher's Guide." (2011 - 2012 Great Michigan Read: Michigan Humanities) ["Arc of Justice is a masterful recounting of a landmark event, culminating in an epic legal battle that helped lay the foundation of the civil rights movement. In 1925, African American physician Ossian Sweet purchased a home in a white neighborhood in Detroit. Determined to protect his family and property, Sweet chose to defend himself from the mob organized to drive him out. Arc of Justice provides essential historical background as Americans continue to confront issues of tolerance and equality."]

Arnove, Anthony, et al. "Howard Zinn Read-In at Purdue University." We Are Many (November 5, 2013)

Ash, Timothy Garton. "The Stasi On Our Minds." The New York Review of Books (May 31, 2007)

Assange, Julian and Slavoj Zizek. "Full Video of WikiLeaks’ Julian Assange & Philosopher Slavoj Žižek With Amy Goodman." Democracy Now (July 2, 2011)

Atkinson, Michael. "Archival Trouble: The fiction-free science fiction of Adam Curtis." Moving Image Source (February 16, 2012)

Bady, Aaron. "Lincoln Against the Radicals." Jacobin (November 26, 2012)

Baggins, Brian. "The Black Panther Party." Marxist Internet Archive (Archive: 2002)

Bagley, Will. "Blazing the Trails Westward." Radio West (September 5, 2011)

Ball, Julien. "A People's History of the French Revolution." We Are Many (June 2010)

Ball, Norman. "The Power of Auteurs and the Last Man Standing: Adam Curtis' Documentary Nightmares." Bright Lights Film Journal #78 (November 2012)

Bandele, Asha and Patrisse Khan-Cullors. "'When They Call You a Terrorist': The Life of Black Lives Matter Co-Founder Patrisse Khan-Cullors." Democracy Now (January 16, 2018) ["We turn now to a powerful new book, released today, that tells the story of one woman as she fights back against the impacts of social and racial injustice in America on her family. That woman is Patrisse Khan-Cullors, co-founder of Black Lives Matter. The book, titled “When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir,” is both an account of survival, strength and resilience, and a call to action to change the culture that declares innocent black life expendable. Patrisse’s story follows her childhood in Los Angeles in the late 1990s and early 2000s, as her mother worked three jobs, struggling to earn a living wage. And it puts a human face on the way mass incarceration and the war on drugs hurt young black men, including her relatives and friends. Patrisse’s father was a victim of the drug war. He died at the age of 50. Her brother spent years in prison for nonviolent crimes stemming from his battles against mental illness. He was once even charged with terrorism after being involved in a car accident. The police would target Patrisse, too—raiding her house without just cause. In 2013, after George Zimmerman was acquitted for the killing of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, Patrisse co-founded Black Lives Matter along with Alicia Garza and Opal Tometi. The movement began online but soon spread across the country. "]

Barker, Holly, et al. "The Secret, Silent Poisoning (Nuclear Victims in Peace and War)." Unwelcome Guests #616 (August 11, 2012)

Batchelor, Stephen. "Confession of a Buddhist Atheist." FORA (March 19, 2010)

Bello, Walden, Kevin Danaher and Njoki Njehu. "Report Back from A16 (The A16 IMF/World Bank Demonstrations in Washington, D.C.)." Unwelcome Guests (April 22, 2000)

Bender, Stephen. "Propaganda, Public Relations, & the Not-So-New Dark Age." LiP(Winter 2006)

Benton, Michael Dean. "The Many Headed Hydra." Politics and Culture (2001)

---. "A nation starts to mobilize: Something’s happening here." North of Center (October 12, 2011)

---. "Occupy: One Year Later." North of Center (September 17, 2012)

Berkshire, Jennifer, et al. "Rethinking Schools in the DeVos Era." Open Source (September21, 2017)  ["Betsy Devos’s “Rethinking School” tour can feel like a mission to dismantle the whole system, public schools first. Choice, charters and change are DeVos’s keynotes, along with a call for more and more crushing competition. We wondered if this this just another race to the top that will ultimately leave most children behind, or if something new is happening.
According to DeVos, her plan might be the only thing new thing in the last century of education history. On her school tour she likes to say schools haven’t changed in the last 100 years: "For far too many kids, this year’s first day back to school looks and feels a lot like last year’s first day back to school. And the year before that. And the generation before that. And the generation before that. That means your parents’ parents’ parents .. It’s a mundane malaise that dampens dreams, dims horizons, and denies futures." We’re trying to offer a counter to DeVos’s vision of public education and it’s discontents. We got schooled on an alternative set of solutions by some educators we like a lot. Jack Schneider gets us started. He’s a school parent in Somerville, and professor of education at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts. He’s on his own mission to “rethink schools,” particularly the metrics we use to measure their worth. He highlights Somerville High School as a case study: a diverse, working-class school thriving despite the odds, but still coming up short in the tests. Jennifer Berkshire—who, along with Jack, co-hosts the education podcast Have You Heard?—gives us the close-up on DeVos. In her reporting, she’s profiled DeVos as one of the leading crusaders in the “holy war against the welfare state” . But she still sees hope in the rising, grassroots resistance to DeVos’s program, which is now one of the most unpopular parts of the Trump platform, even in the red states. Malcolm Harris, the 29-year-old author of Kids These Days: Human Capital and the Making of Millennials, accounts for the new pressures placed on the millennial generation of students. “We are poorer, more medicated, and more precariously employed than our parents, grandparents, even our great grandparents,” he writes. The disease, he says, is neoliberalism and unfettered capitalism. It’s a deeper rot that cannot be solved simply through social democratic reform or technocratic tweaks, and it still needs something more than a political revolution to create real change.
Finally, Charles Petersen, an editor for N+1 and PhD candidate in the American Studies program at Harvard University, outlines a deeper history of competition in American education. His ideological frame is not neoliberalism, per se, but the myth of meritocracy itself."]

Berti, Irene and Marta García Morcillo, eds. Hellas on Screen: Cinematic Receptions of Ancient History, Literature and Myth. Franz Steiner Verlag Stuttgart, 2008.

Biggers, Jeff. "How to Treat a Common Scold: A history of sending women to court for the crime of having opinions." Roundtable (November 13, 2017)

Blakemore, Colin. "Mechanics of the Mind." The Reith Lecture (November 10 - December 15, 1976)

Blyth, Mark, David Kaiser and Vanessa Williamson. "The French Sensation: Income Inequality in 700 Pages and a Hundred Graphs." Radio Open Source (May 1, 2014)

Bothwell, Cecil. "Billy Graham and the Gospel of Fear." Counterpunch (February 21, 2018)

Bowden, Charles. "Observations about the American psyche, essays on the natural world, and gritty stories about drug violence and other crimes." Radio West (September 5, 2014)

Branch, Taylor, Trey Ellis and Peter Kunhardt. "MLK’s Radical Final Years: Civil Rights Leader Was Isolated After Taking On Capitalism & Vietnam War." Democracy Now (January 25, 2018) ["Fifty years ago this April, Rev. Martin Luther King was assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee. He was just 39 years old. Today we look back at the last three years of King’s life, beginning after President Lyndon Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Despite passage of the monumental legislation, King set his eyes on new battles by launching a Poor People’s Campaign and campaigning to stop the Vietnam War. King’s decision to publicly oppose the war isolated him from many of his closest supporters. We feature clips from a new HBO documentary about King’s last years, titled “King in the Wilderness,” and speak with Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Taylor Branch, who wrote the “America in the King Years” trilogy and is featured in the film, as well as the film’s director Peter Kunhardt and writer Trey Ellis."]

Braund, Susanna. "The Poetry of Virgil." Entitled Opinions (October 25, 2005)

Butigan, Ken. "A May to Remember." Waging Nonviolence (May 3, 2012)

Calhoun, Craig and David Graeber. "The Democracy Project." The London School of Economics and Political Science." (April 30, 2013)

Chandler, Bill, et al. "Chokwe Lumumba: Remembering "America’s Most Revolutionary Mayor" Democracy Now (February 26, 2014)

Chatterjee, Partha. "Nationalism, Internationalism and Cosmopolitanism: some lessons from modern Indian history." London School of Economics and Political Science (April 3, 2014)

"Chernobyl 25 Years On." Eurozine (April 22, 2011: Archive of Essays)

"Chicano Park, Barrio Logan, San Diego: The Takeover of Chicano Park." History of Chicano Park (ND) [also "Murals Appear in Chicano Park" and "The Restoration of the Murals in Chicano Park"]

"Chile Rising." Fault Lines (Documentary video posted on Youtube: January 2, 2012)

Chomsky, Noam. "On Corporate Personhood." (8 minute video in which he answers a question at a public presentation on April 22, 2011)

---. "What the American Media Won't Tell You About Israel." AlterNet (December 3, 2012)

Chua, Amy. "The Myths of Globalization: Markets, Democracy, and Ethnic Hatred." Conversations with History (November 21, 2005)

Clair, Jeffrey St. and Alexander Cockburn. "Operation Paperclip: NAZI Science Heads West." Counterpunch (December 8, 2017)

---. "The Preacher and Vietnam: When Billy Graham Urged Nixon to Kill One Million People." Counterpunch (September 27, 2017)

Cleaver, Kathleen, Danny Glover and Brian Jones. "The Black Power Mixtape." We Are Many (May 7, 2014) ["The New School and Haymarket Books present: Danny Glover, Kathleen Cleaver, and Brian Jones discussing the new book: The Black Power Mixtape: 1967-1975. Moderated by School of Media Studies Assistant Professor, Michelle Materre. The Black Power Mixtape: 1967 -- 1975 is an extraordinary window into the black freedom struggle in the United States, offering a treasure trove of fresh archival information about the Black Power movement from 1967 to 1975 and vivid portraits of some of its most dynamic participants, including Angela Davis and Stokely Carmichael. The book — like the documentary film that inspired it — includes historical speeches and interviews by: Stokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture), Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Eldridge Cleaver, Bobby Seale, Huey P. Newton, Emile de Antonio, and Angela Davis. And it also features new commentary voiced by: Erykah Badu, Talib Kweli, Harry Belafonte, Kathleen Cleaver, Angela Davis, Robin Kelley, Abiodun Oyewole, Sonia Sanchez, Bobby Seale, John Forte, and Questlove."]

"Coal Reignites Mighty Battle of Labor History." NPR (March 5, 2011)

Cohen,Julie and Betsy West. "RBG: New Documentary Celebrates Life of Groundbreaking Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg." Democracy Now (January 22, 2018) ["One of the most talked-about documentaries at this year’s Sundance Film Festival looks at the groundbreaking life of the nearly 85-year-old Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. 2018 marks her 25th year on the court, and she has no plans to retire. Ginsburg first gained fame in the 1970s when she co-founded the Women’s Rights Project at the American Civil Liberties Union, where she argued six gender discrimination cases before the Supreme Court. In recent years, Ginsburg’s public profile has soared as the court has swerved to the right. Ginsburg often now finds herself on the dissenting side of opinions. We feature excerpts from the new film and speak with its directors, Julie Cohen and Betsy West."]

COINTELPRO 101 (USA: Andres Alegria, et al, 2010: 56 mins) ["A secret illegal project from the 1950s, 60s and 70s called COINTELPRO, represents the state’s strategy to prevent resistance movements and communities from achieving their ends of racial justice, social equality and human rights. The program was mandated by the United States’ FBI, formally inscribing a conspiracy to destroy social movements, as well as mount institutionalised attacks against allies of such movements and other key organisations. Some of the goals were to disrupt, divide, and destroy movements, as well as instilling paranoia, manipulation by surveillance, imprisonment, and even outright murder of key figures of movements and other people. Many of the government’s crimes are still unknown. Through interviews with activists who experienced these abuses first-hand, COINTELPRO 101 opens the door to understanding this history, with the intended audience being the generations that did not experience the social justice movements of the 60s and 70s; where illegal surveillance, disruption, and outright murder committed by the government was rampant and rapacious. This film stands to provide an educational introduction to a period of intense repression, to draw many relevant and important lessons for the present and the future of social justice."]

Coll, Steve. "Directorate S: Steve Coll on the CIA & America’s Secret Wars in Afghanistan & Pakistan." Democracy Now (February 8, 2018) ["The U.S. is intensifying its air war in Afghanistan as U.S. Central Command has announced it is shifting military resources from Iraq and Syria back to Afghanistan, where the United States has been fighting for over 16 years in the longest war in U.S. history. U.S. Air Force Major General James Hecker recently said Afghanistan has “become CENTCOM’s main effort.” The news comes after a particularly bloody period in Afghanistan. Despite the spiraling violence, President Trump recently ruled out negotiations with the Taliban during a meeting of members of the United Nations Security Council. We speak to Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Steve Coll about his new book, Directorate S: The C.I.A. and America’s Secret Wars in Afghanistan and Pakistan."]

Connor, J.D., Florence Dore and Dan Sinykin. "Rebel Yale: Reading and Feeling Hillbilly Elegy." Los Angeles Review of Books (January 10, 2018)

Conversations with History (University of California-Berkeley: "Conceived in 1982 by Mr. Kreisler as a way to capture and preserve through conversation and technology the intellectual ferment of our times, Conversations with History includes over 500 interviews.">

Coombs, Wayne. "Analysis: The Pharmaceutical Colonization of Appalachia." The Daily Yonder (February 7, 2018)

Crawford, Jarmahl, Peniel Joseph and Isabel Wilkerson. "Stokely Carmichael and Black Power." Radio Open Source (March 6, 2014)

Daesler, Graham. "Cutter's Way: The Mysterious Art of Film Editing." Bright Lights Film Journals #78 (2012)

Danticat, Edwidge, et al. "Climate Change & The End of Eden." Open Source (September 28, 2017)

Delblanco, Andrew. "A Vengeful Fury: Greg Grandin’s Empire of Necessity." The New York Times (January 12, 2014)

Dellums, Ronald V. "Legislating for the People." Conversations with History (November 21, 2005)

Desai, Anita and Andrew Robinson. "The Modern Resonance of Rabindranath Tagore." On Being (August 6, 2014) ["He bestowed the title “Mahatma” on Gandhi. He debated the deepest nature of reality with Einstein. He was championed by Yeats and Pound to become the first non-European to win the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1913. Rabindranath Tagore was a polymath — a writer and a painter, a philosopher and a musician, and a social innovator — but much of his poetry and prose is virtually untranslatable (or inaccessibly translated) for modern minds. We pull back the "dusty veils" that have hidden his memory from history."]

DiLeo, Petrino. "An Economic History of the Great Depression." We Are Many (June 18, 2009)

Donner, Fred and McQuire Gibson. "Iraq Before Saddam Hussein." CHIASMOS (April 3, 2003)

Duncan, Mike. "The English Civil War (1642 - 1651)." Revolutions (1.1 -1.16)

Eisen, Arnold. "The Opposite of Good is Indifference." On Being (September 21, 2017) ["'In a free society, some are guilty, but all are responsible.' A mystic, a 20th-century religious intellectual, a social change agent, Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel marched alongside Martin Luther King, Jr., famously saying afterwards that he felt his legs were praying. Heschel’s poetic theological writings are still read and widely studied today. His faith was as much about 'radical amazement' as it was about certainty. And he embodied the passionate social engagement of the prophets, drawing on wisdom at once provocative and nourishing."]

Ellsberg, Daniel. "Daniel Ellsberg Reveals He Was a Nuclear War Planner, Warns of Nuclear Winter & Global Starvation." Democracy Now (December 6, 2017) ["Could tension between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un bring us to the brink of nuclear war? As tensions ramp up, we discuss what nuclear war would look like with a former nuclear war planner and one of the world’s most famous whistleblowers—Daniel Ellsberg. In 1971, Ellsberg was a high-level defense analyst when he leaked a top-secret report on U.S. involvement in Vietnam to The New York Times and other publications, which came to be known as the Pentagon Papers. He played a key role in ending the Vietnam War. Few know Ellsberg was also a Pentagon and White House consultant who drafted plans for nuclear war. His new book, published Tuesday, is titled “The Doomsday Machine: Confessions of a Nuclear War Planner.” We speak with Ellsberg about his top-secret nuclear studies, his front row seat to the Cuban missile crisis, whether Trump could start a nuclear war and how contemporary whistleblowers Chelsea Manning and Ed Snowden are his heroes."]

Fazli, Shehryar. "The Legacy of Eric Garner: Policing Still Going Wrong." Los Angeles Review of Books (December 11, 2017)

Federici, Sylvia. Caliban and the Witch: Women, The Body and Primitive Accumulation. 2nd Revised Edition. Autonomedia, 2014.

Fernandez, Toniann. "White Man On a Pedestal." Paris Review (November 29, 2017)

Finkelstein, Norman. "Norman Finkelstein on What Gandhi Says About Nonviolence, Resistance and Courage." Democracy Now (June 5, 2012)

Foster, John Bellamy. "Education and the Structural Crisis of Capital: The U.S. Case." Monthly Review (July 1, 2011)

Foster, John Bellamy, Robert W. McChesney and R. Jamil Jonna. "Monopoly and Competition in Twenty-First Century Capitalism." Monthly Review (April 1, 2011)

Foucault, Michel. "Panopticism." From Discipline & Punish: The Birth of the Prison (NY: Vintage Books 1995): 195-228.

France, David and Peter Staley. "How to Survive a Plague": As ACT UP Turns 25, New Film Chronicles History of AIDS Activism in U.S." Democracy Now (March 23, 2012)

Fry, Douglas P. "Peace in Our Time: Steven Pinker offers a curiously foreshortened account of humanity's irenic urges." Bookforum (December/January 2012)

Galeano, Eduardo. "In Conversation with Maria Arana." Lannan Podcasts (May 20, 2013)

Garza, Alicia. "A Herstory of the #BlackLivesMatter Movement." The Feminist Wire (October 7, 2014)

Gillepsie, Alex, Philip Horne and Sandra Jovchelovitch. "Literary Festival 2014: More Tales from the Two James(es)." The London School of Economics and Political Science (February 23, 2014) ["... readings from the work of William and Henry James to explore the links between psychology and fiction."]

Gilmore, Jim, et al. "Netanyahu at War." Frontline (January 6, 2017) ["An inside look at Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s political rise and his relationship with the U.S."]

Giovanni, Nikki. "Award winning poet and writer Nikki Giovanni shares her thoughts on black history, and the recent loss of Rosa Parks, Coretta Scott King, and her own mother." Uprising Radio (February 17, 2006)

Glanville, Phillipa. "The Dichotomies of Drink: The History of Alcohol 1690 - 1920." The National Archive Podcast Series (September 28, 2006)

"Global Financial and Economic Crises of 2007 - 2009." History Commons (Historical Timeline)

"Global Warming." History Commons (Ongoing Historical Timeline)

Goddard, Stephen. "'So, Did You See Me?': Testimony, Memory and Re-Making Film History." LOLA #1 (2011)

Gonzalez, Pedro Blas. "Citizen Kane: Biography and the Unfinished Sentence." Senses of Cinema #57 (2010)

Graeber, David. "Debt: The First Five Thousand Years." Mute (February 10, 2009)

---. "Occupy Wall Street's anarchist roots: The 'Occupy' movement is one of several in American history to be based on anarchist principles." Al Jazeera (November 30, 2011)

Graeber, David, et al. "Let Your Life Be A Friction (To Stop The Machine)." Unwelcome Guests #593 (March 3, 2012)

---, et al. "Occupy 2.0 (Peer Produced Politics)." Unwelcome Guests #594 (March 10, 2012)

---, et al. "The Psychology of Transition: Undoing Millennia of Social Control." Unwelcome Guests #597 (March 31, 2012)

Green, James. "Death in the Haymarket." We Are Many (June 17, 2010)

Greenberg, Joel. "A Feathered River Across the Sky." Radio West (April 24, 2014) ["This year marks the hundredth anniversary of the death of Martha, the last passenger pigeon. Her species was native to North America, and in the 1800s the birds numbered in the billions. Their vast airborne flocks reportedly blotted out the sun and took days to pass overhead. But in just a few decades, they were gone. Naturalist Joel Greenberg has written a book about the passenger pigeon’s natural history and its speedy flight to extinction, and he joins us to examine what the bird’s demise reveals about our relationship to the natural world."]

Greenwald, Glenn. "Margaret Thatcher and misapplied death etiquette: The dictate that one 'not speak ill of the dead' is (at best) appropriate for private individuals, not influential public figures." Comment is Free (April 8, 2013)

Hamburger, Philip and Steven Waldman. "The Long Experiment of American Democracy." On Being (July 3, 2014)

Hardcore History (Dan Carlin's history show: It's a hard recipe to master, but when passion and reason are finely blended the results can be unpredictable and intoxicating. They can also be maddening. This is part of the attraction of Dan Carlin. Original and outside-the-box thinking on current events and history to be sure, but could he also be woefully out of step with conventional wisdom? He talks fast, he's loud, he's a deep thinker who adores history and who will challenge your view of the world, while he does the same thing to himself. He's a bit of a throwback to something from the past, and yet not quite like anything else yet seen. It's a New Media/ “eye of the beholder” sort of thing. You'll have to decide for yourself. His style is not for everyone. It's not meant to be.)

Harvey, David. Reading Marx's Capital with David Harvey." (A close reading of the text of Karl Marx’s Capital Volume I in 13 video lectures by Professor David Harvey: 2011)

Hecht, Jennifer Michael. "A History of Doubt." Being (May 3, 2007)

Hedges, Inez. "Amnesiac memory: Hiroshima/Nagasaki in Japanese film." Jump Cut #55 (Fall 2013)

Heenan, Natasha. "Sylvia Federici's Caliban and the Witch." Progress in Political Economy (November 6, 2017) [You can read the book online here]

"Hemp for Victory." US Department of Agriculture (1942)

Henderson, A. Gwynn. "The Myth of Kentucky as a 'Dark and Bloody Ground.'" 30 Days of Kentucky Archaeology (September 29, 2017)

Herzog, Werner and Errol Morris. "The Act of Killing." Vice (Video posted on Youtube: July 17, 2013)

History Commons ("The History Commons website is operated by the Center for Grassroots Oversight ("CGO"), a 501(c)3 non-profit organization. CGO was incorporated as a public benefit corporation in late 2006, and received its 501(c)3 status on February 26, 2009. The website is a tool for open-content participatory journalism. It allows people to investigate important issues by providing a space where people can collaborate on the documentation of past and current events, as well as the entities associated with those events.")

"History of the Paris Commune." Marxists Internet Archive (Archive)

"History of US Interventions History Commons (Ongoing Historical Timeline)

Hoock, Holger. "Scars of Independence." Radio West (August 9, 2017) ["we’re taking a different look at the American Revolutionary War. We think of it as brave patriots fighting for a noble cause, which is true, but in his new book historian Holger Hoock is trying to remind us just how bloody it was. The British brutalized American soldiers; we tortured loyalists. In fact, this cruelty shaped the outcome of the war. Hoock’s book is called Scars of Independence: America’s Violent Birth and he's joining us to talk about it."]

Horvat, Srećko and Igor Štiks. "Welcome to the Desert of Transition!: Post-Socialism, the European Union, and a New Left in the Balkans." Monthly Review (March 1, 2012)

Houp, Wesley. "Life by Rheotaxis: A River Rat's Perspective North of Center (April 13, 2011)

Hudis, Peter. "Frantz Fanon, The Philosopher of the Barricades." Against the Grain (October 9, 2017) ["Peter Hudis discusses the Martiniquan philosopher, psychiatrist, and revolutionary Frantz Fanon, best known for his books The Wretched of the Earth and Black Skin, White Masks."]

Hudson, David. "The Civil War @ 150 MUBI (April 12, 2011)

Hudson, Michael and Jeffrey Sommers. "The Queen Mother of Global Austerity and Financialization: Thatcher's Mean Legacy." Democracy Now (April 8, 2013)

Huerta, Delores and Jose Antonio Orozco. "The Non-Violent Path of Cesar Chavez." Making Contact (April 9, 2014)

Human Resources: Social Engineering in the 20th Century (USA: Scott Noble, 2010: 119 mins) ["Human Resources — Social Engineering in the 20th Century is about the rise of mechanistic philosophy and the exploitation of human beings under modern hierarchical systems. The film captures how humans are regarded as a resource by corporations—something to be exploited for pecuniary gain—by following the history of psychological experiments in behaviour modification, conditioning and mind control; applying the outcomes to modern day establishment experiments such as institutionalised education, military training, and social engineering by way of things like television…"]

Hunt, Patrick. "The Rosetta Stone." Entitled Opinions (October 12, 2011)

"Iraq War Timeline: From "Shock and Awe" to Civilian Toll, to Billions in Reconstruction, Vet Health." Democracy Now (March 19, 2013)

Islay, David. "The Everyday Art of Listening." On Being (April 17, 2014)

Jilani, Zaid. "Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebrations Overlook His Critiques of Capitalism and Militarism." The Intercept (January 18, 2016)

Johnson, Adam, et al. "The North Korea Memory Hole." Citations Needed (July 19, 2017)

Johnson, Chalmers. "Militarism and the American Empire." Conversations with History (2005)

Jones, Mark, et al. "Rosa Luxemburg." In These Times (April 13, 2017) ["Melvyn Bragg discusses the life and times of Rosa Luxemburg (1871-1919), 'Red Rosa', who was born in Poland under the Russian Empire and became one of the leading revolutionaries in an age of revolution. Shewas jailed for agitation and for her campaign against the Great War which, she argued, pitted workers against each other for the sake of capitalism. With Karl Liebknecht and other radicals, she founded the Spartacus League in the hope of ending the war through revolution. She founded the German Communist Party with Liebknecht; with the violence that followed the German Revolution of 1918, her opponents condemned her as Bloody Rosa. She and Liebknecht were seen as ringleaders in the Spartacus Revolt of 1919 and, on 15th January 1919, the Freikorps militia arrested and murdered them. While Luxemburg has faced opposition for her actions and ideas from many quarters, she went on to become an iconic figure in East Germany under the Cold War and a focal point for opposition to the Soviet-backed leadership."]

Jones, William P. and Gary Younge. "50 Years Later, the Untold History of the March on Washington & MLK’s Most Famous Speech." Democracy Now (August 21, 2013)

Kahle, Brewster and Rick Prelinger. "The 9/11 TV News Archive: 3,000 Hours of Video News Coverage of 2001 Attacks Posted Online." Democracy Now (August 24, 2011)

---. "Pioneering Internet Archivists Brewster Kahle and Rick Prelinger on Preservation in the Digital Age." Democracy Now (August 24, 2011)

Kappeler, Victor E. "Ideology and the Historic Moment of Production: Part 1 of a 5 Part Series." Uprooting Criminology (November 25, 2013)

---. "Ideology and the Historic Moment of Production: Part 2 of a 5 Part Series." Uprooting Criminology (December 9, 2013)

---. "Ideology and the Historic Moment of Production: Part 3 of a 5 Part Series." Uprooting Criminology (January 9, 2014)

---. "Ideology and the Historic Moment of Production: Part 4 of a 5 Part Series." Uprooting Criminology (February 15, 2014)

Karski, Jan. "Polish Resistance Figure Jan Karski, Honored with Posthumous Medal of Freedom, in His Own Words" Democracy Now (June 5, 2012)

Katsiaficas, George. "1968, 40 Years Later: Student, Worker Protests Sweep France, Leaving Indelible Mark on the Country and the World. Democracy Now (May 14, 2008)

...-- The Subversion of Politics: European Autonomous Social Movements and the Decolonization of Everyday Life. (AK Press, 2006)

Khalidi, Rashid and Salim Yaqub. "Constraining and Shaping Nationalism: The United States and Iraq." CHIASMOS (April 7, 2003)

Kilpatrick, Connor. "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down." Jacobin (November 28, 2012)

King, Martin Luther, Jr. "Letter From a Birmingham Jail." African Studies Center of University of Pennsylvania (April 16, 1963)

---. "Newly Discovered 1964 MLK Speech on Civil Rights, Segregation & Apartheid South Africa." Democracy Now (January 15, 2018) ["In a Democracy Now! and Pacifica Radio Archives exclusive, we air a newly discovered recording of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. On December 7, 1964, days before he received the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo, King gave a major address in London on segregation, the fight for civil rights and his support for Nelson Mandela and the anti-apartheid struggle in South Africa. The speech was recorded by Saul Bernstein, who was working as the European correspondent for Pacifica Radio. Bernstein’s recording was recently discovered by Brian DeShazor, director of the Pacifica Radio Archives."]

---. "On 45th Anniversary of His Death, Martin Luther King Jr. on the Power of Media and the Horror of War." Democracy Now (April 4, 2013)

Kinzer, Stephen and William Murphy, Jr. "US Wars and Social Control (From Regime Change Abroad to the War on Drugs at Home)." Unwelcome Guests #304 (April 30, 2006) ["In our first hour, this week, Stephen Kinzer, whose book, Overthrow, details the US empire's long history of instigating regime change, both the public pretext and the real interests at play. In our second hour, William Murphy Jr speaks about the "War On Drugs"."]

Kitty, Alexandra. "Objectivity in Journalism: Should We Be Skeptical?" Skeptic (ND)

Knight, Sam. "Where should Richard III lie? The battle over the burial of King Richard III has become savage." Prospect (December 12, 2013)

Krul, Matthijs. "Mandela and Socialism." The Northstar (December 9, 2013)

Kuznick, Peter and Oliver Stone. "The Untold U.S. History from the Atomic Age to Vietnam to Obama’s Drone Wars." Democracy Now (November 16, 2012)

Kwoba, Brian. "How Capitalism Underdeveloped Africa." We Are Many (June 2009)

Lauer, Josh. "Credit Agencies and the Commodification of Personal Information." Against the Grain (October 2, 2017) ["If you think the collection and selling of personal data began in the last twenty years, think again. Consumer credit agencies like Equifax have been gathering information about people’s intimate details since they were created in the late 19th century. Scholar Josh Lauer discusses the history of credit agencies, their key role in capitalist consumer culture, and why we shouldn’t expect them to look out for consumers."]

Lears, Jackson. "A History of Disappointment." London Review of Books 34.1 (January 5, 2012)

Lepore, Jill. "Tea Party Time ... and the Death of Compassion." Open Source (October 14, 2010)

Lewis, John. "John Lewis Marches On." Moyers & Company (July 26, 2013)

Lichtblau, Eric. "The Nazis Next Door: Eric Lichtblau on how the CIA & FBI Secretly Sheltered Nazi War Criminals." Democracy Now (October 31, 2014)

---. "Pt. 2: On The Nazis Next Door: How America Became a Safe Haven for Hitler’s Men." Democracy Now (October 31, 2014)

Linebaugh, Peter and Marcus Rediker. The Many Headed Hydra: The Hidden History of the Revolutionary Atlantic. Boston: Beacon Press, 2000.

Loewen, James W. Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong. Simon and Schuster, 1996.

Luna, Diego. "Diego Luna on His Directorial Debut, Cesar Chavez." Uprising Radio (March 24, 2014)

Lydon, Christopher. "Noam Chomsky: Neoliberalism is Destroying Our Democracy." The Nation (June 2, 2017)

MacCulloch, Diarmaid. "Christianity - The First 3,000 Years." Radio West (November 29, 2010)

Magdoff, Fred. "Food as a Commodity." Monthly Review (January 1, 2012)

Mahani, Najmeh Khalili. "Mirroring History: Fassbinder’s The BRD Trilogy." Offscreen 17.2 (February 28, 2013)

Maher, Stephen. "The Political Economy of the Egyptian Uprising." Monthly Review (November 1, 2011)

Manningham-Buller, Eliza. "Securing Freedom." Reith Lectures (2011)

Marks, Ben. "Trailing Angela Davis, from FBI Flyers to 'Radical Chic' Art." Collector's Weekly (July 3, 2013)

Marshall, Robert. "The Dark Legacy of Carlos Castaneda." Salon (April 4, 2007)

Mayer, Danny. "Northside Gentrification." (Posted on Youtube: December 18, 2017)

Mayo, Nick and Jake Stattel. "Iraqi Kurdistan: Past and Present." War News Radio (November 10, 2017)

McKormack, Owen. "Columbus Day and the Sanitization of History." TruthOut (October 12, 2014)

McLemee, Scott. "CLR James and African American Liberation." We Are Many (June 18, 2009)

Mearsheimer, John and Robert Pape. "The War in Iraq and America's Role in the World." CHIASMOS (April 17, 2003)

Morley, David and Bill Schwarz. "Stuart Hall obituary: Influential cultural theorist, campaigner and founding editor of the New Left Review." The Guardian (February 10, 2014)

Morris, Earl. "The Unknown Known: Errol Morris’ New Doc Tackles Unrepentant Iraq War Architect Donald Rumsfeld." Democracy Now (March 27, 2014)

Moser, Richard. "How Corporate Power Killed Democracy." Counterpunch (December 6, 2017)

Moulton, Gary. "Lewis and Clark's New Look." The UO Channel (November 4, 2004) ["This lecture will explore new ways of judging the characters and personalities of the leading figures of the Corps of Discovery–Meriwether Lewis, William Clark and Sacagawea–in light of new research. Moulton is Thomas C. Sorenson Professor of American History Emeritus at the University of Nebraska and editor of The Journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition."]

National Security Archive ["An independent non-governmental research institute and library located at The George Washington University, the Archive collects and publishes declassified documents obtained through the Freedom of Information Act. The Archive also serves as a repository of government records on a wide range of topics pertaining to the national security, foreign, intelligence, and economic policies of the United States. The Archive won the 1999 George Polk Award, one of U.S. journalism's most prestigious prizes, for--in the words of the citation--"piercing the self-serving veils of government secrecy, guiding journalists in the search for the truth and informing us all." The Archive obtains its materials through a variety of methods, including the Freedom of Information act, Mandatory Declassification Review, presidential paper collections, congressional records, and court testimony. Archive staff members systematically track U.S. government agencies and federal records repositories for documents that either have never been released before, or that help to shed light on the decision-making process of the U.S. government and provide the historical context underlying those decisions. The Archive regularly publishes portions of its collections on microfiche, the World Wide Web, CD-ROM, and in books. The Washington Journalism Review called these publications, collectively totaling more than 500,000 pages, "a state-of-the-art index to history." The Archive's World Wide Web site, www.nsarchive.org, has won numerous awards, including USA Today's "Hot Site" designation. As a part of its mission to broaden access to the historical record, the Archive is also a leading advocate and user of the Freedom of Information Act. Precedent-setting Archive lawsuits have brought into the public domain new materials on the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Iran-Contra Affair, and other issues that have changed the way scholars interpret those events. The Archive spearheaded the groundbreaking legal effort to preserve millions of pages of White House e-mail records that were created during the Reagan, Bush, and Clinton administrations. The Archive's mission of guaranteeing the public's right to know extends to other countries outside the United States. The organization is currently involved in efforts to sponsor freedom of information legislation in the nations of Central Europe, Central and South America and elsewhere, and is committed to finding ways to provide technical and other services that will allow archives and libraries overseas to introduce appropriate records management systems into their respective institutions. The Archive's $2.5 million yearly budget comes from publication revenues, contributions from individuals and grants from foundations such as the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Ford Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and the Open Society Institute. As a matter of policy, the Archive seeks no U.S. government funding."]

"Neoconservative Think Tank Influence on US Policies." History Commons (Ongoing Historical Timeline)

Nichols, Alex. "You Should Be Terrified That People Who Like Hamilton Run Our Country." Current Affairs (July 29, 2016)

Nightingale, Andrea. "Epicurus and Epicureanism." Entitled Opinions (November 8, 2005)

---. "Is Henry David Thoreau a Philosopher?" Entitled Opinions (October 18, 2017)

Noujaim, Jehane. "The Square: Jehane Noujaim’s New Film Captures Egypt’s Ongoing Revolution After Mubarak’s Fall." Democracy Now (January 25, 2014)

Oliver, Paul. "Michel Foucault - The Development of Knowledge." Excerpt from Foucault: The Key Ideas. Blacklick, OH: McGraw Hill, 2010: 17-21.

Parenti, Michael. "Executive Power and Democratic Needs." Unwelcome Guests #5 (April 5, 2000)

---. "Globalization: The New Imperialism." Unwelcome Guests (March 22, 2000)

---. "The Sword and the Dollar." Unwelcome Guests #4 (April 5, 2000)

Peebles, Stacey. "Stories from the Suck: The First Wave of Iraq War Narratives." Berfois (April 15, 2011)

Perlstein, Rick. "Chicago History Repeats Itself As Cops and Protesters Clash." Rolling Stone (May 21, 2012)

Peter, Justin "The Idealist Aaron Swartz wanted to save the world. Why couldn’t he save himself?" Slate (February 7, 2013)

Pinker, Steven. "The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined." Radio Open Source (March 10. 2014)

Pollitt, Katha. "Birth Control: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow." The Nation (August 15, 2011)

Ransby, Barbara. "Remembering the Overlooked Life of Eslanda Robeson, Wife of Civil Rights Legend Paul Robeson." Democracy Now (February 12, 2013)

Ratner, Michael. "Ten Years after 9/11: War, Operation American Condor (Guantanamo) , Civil Liberties and Hope." Law and Disorder Radio (July 25, 2011)

Ravitch, Diane. "Public Schools for Sale." Moyers & Co. (March 28, 2014)

Rich, Nathaniel. "Authenticity All Right: Lee Friedlander’s New Orleans." New York Review of Books (May 16, 2014)

Risen, James. "The Biggest Secret: James Risen on Life as a NY Times Reporter in the Shadow of the War on Terror." Democracy Now (January 5, 2018) ["We spend the hour with former New York Times reporter James Risen, who left the paper in August to join The Intercept as senior national security correspondent. This week, he published a 15,000-word story headlined “The Biggest Secret: My Life as a New York Times Reporter in the Shadow of the War on Terror.” The explosive piece describes his struggles to publish major national security stories in the post-9/11 period and how both the government and his own editors at The New York Times suppressed his reporting, including reports on the Bush administration’s warrantless wiretapping program, for which he would later win the Pulitzer Prize. Risen describes meetings between key Times editors and top officials at the CIAand the White House. His refusal to name a source would take him to the Supreme Court, and he almost wound up in jail, until the Obama administration blinked."]

Robb, Graham. "Paris: 18 Arrested Explosions." Radio Open Source (May 7, 2010)

Rosen, David. "Century of the National Security State: A New Subversives List." Counterpunch (November 29, 2017)

Rosenfeld, Seth. "A Secret History of America in the Sixties." Excerpt from Subversives: The FBI's War on Student Radicals, and Reagan's Rise to Power. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2012: 7-8.

---. "Spies in the Hill." Excerpt from Subversives: The FBI's War on Student Radicals, and Reagan's Rise to Power. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2012: 11-27.

---. "'Subversives': How the FBI Fought the 1960s Student Movement and Aided Reagan’s Rise to Power." (August 23, 2012)

Rosenzweig, Roy. "Wizards, Bureaucrats, Warriors, and Hackers: Writing the History of the Internet." The American Historical Review (December 1998: 1530-1552)

Scahill, Jeremy. "The Dangerous US Game in Yemen." The Nation (March 31, 2011)

Schnapp, Jeffrey. "The Phenomenon of Crowds." Entitled Opinions (November 29, 2005)

Schulman, Sarah. "AIDs and Gentrification." Against the Grain (November 20, 2012)

Schulte, Elizabeth. "Eugene Debs and American Socialism." We are Many (June 18, 2009)

Seal, Kevin. "News of the Occupation: Occupiers Past and Present – Oakland Union of the Homeless." The Occupied Oakland Journal (November 17, 2011)

Shah, Anup. "Global Financial Crisis." Global Issues (March 24, 2013)

Shaw, John. "The problem of the poor: faith, science and poverty in 19th century Britain." The National Archives Podcast Series (September 28, 2006)

Sheehan, Thomas. "On the Historical Jesus." Entitled Opinions (January 31, 2006)

Shiva, Vandana. Stolen Harvest: The Hijacking of the Global Food Supply. Cambridge, MA: South End Press, 2000: 1-9.

Sifton, John. "A Brief History of Drones." The Nation (February 27, 2012)

Sisk-Franco, Caleen. "The War Dance of the Winnemem Wintu." Making Contact (May 13, 2009)

Skidmore, Emily. "Introduction: Harry Gorman's Buffalo." True Sex: The Lives of Trans Men at the Turn of the 20th Century. New York University Press, 2017: 1-17.

Slavery By Another Name (USA:Samuel D. Pollard, 2012: 90 mins) ["A documentary that recounts the many ways in which American slavery persisted as a practice many decades after its supposed abolition."]

Sluga, Hans. "The Life and Work of Michel Foucault." Entitled Opinions (April 18, 2012)

Smith, Zadie. "Generation Why?" The New York Review of Books (November 25, 2010)

Solnit, David and Ananda Tan. "The Battle of Seattle 10 Years Later: Organizers Reflect on 1999 Shutdown of WTO Talks and the Birth of a Movement." Democracy Now (November 30, 2009)

Stolberg, Sheryl Gay. "Paying Respects, Pentagon Revives Vietnam, and War Over Truth." The New York Times (October 9, 2014)

Stoller, Matt. "The Hamilton Hustle: Why liberals have embraced our most dangerously reactionary founder." The Baffler #34 (March 2017)

Stout, Robert Joe. "Do the United States and Mexico Really Want the Drug War to Succeed." Monthly Review (January 1, 2012)

Streckert, Joe. "Echoes of the Klan: The History of the Ku Klux Klan in Oregon—and the Striking Similarities You May Recognize." The Portland Mercury (November 15, 2017)

Sumanthiran, Shiloh and Serena Sung-Clarke. "Rohingya Refugee Crisis (Part 1)." War News Radio (October 28, 2017) ["In August, clashes between the Burmese government and the ethnic minority Rohingya intensified, leaving casualties and many Rohingya people vulnerable to violence. Since then, over 500,000 Rohingya have fled their home in Myanmar’s Rakhine State. The media and foreign workers have been barred from entering Rakhine, but stories of ethnic cleansing and plunder have emerged. Who, exactly, are the Rohingya and how did this happen? To understand the current crisis, we have to go back in time…"]

Taylor, G. Flint. "Lessons From the Greensboro Massacre." Law and Disorder (November 13, 2017) ["Thirty eight years ago, on November 3, 1979, 35 heavily armed members of the Ku Klux Klan and the American Nazi party drove nine vehicles through the city of Greensboro, North Carolina, and opened fire on a multi-racial group of demonstrators who were gathering at a black housing project in preparation for an anti-Klan march. Using semi automatic rifles, shotguns and pistols the Nazis and Kukluxers fired 1000 projectiles in 88 seconds killing five march leaders and wounding seven other demonstrators. Most of the victims were associated with the Communist Workers Party, a multi racial group which had been organizing in the south for workers rights in the cotton mills and against the Ku Klux Klan. The Greensboro police, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation were all aware of the planned attack. Four TV stations captured the massacre on video. A reluctant local district Attorney obtained six indictments under pressure from the Greensboro Justice Fund which had been organized by the windows of the victims, and the public outcry. A six-month trial resulted in the acquittal of all six defendants. Then a reluctant Reagan administration Department of Justice tried nine of the Klansmen and Nazis on civil rights conspiracy charges. After a three-month trial all nine were acquitted. A year after the massacre a civil rights suit was brought on behalf of the 16 victims. It exposed the depth and contours of official involvement. After an extraordinary dramatic 10 weeks civil trial a southern jury finally convicted a good number of the actors in the massacre. The verdict was national news."]


Theoharis, Jeanne. "A More Beautiful & Terrible History: The Whitewashing & Distortion of Rosa Parks and MLK’s Legacies." Democracy Now (February 6, 2018) ["On February 4, 1968, Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his historic “The Drum Major Instinct” sermon at the Ebenezer Baptist Church, two months before his assassination. On Sunday, 50 years later, the words of his sermon were used to in a Dodge Ram truck advertisement at the Super Bowl. The ad sparked widespread criticism for the obvious distortion of Dr. King’s message. But other revisions to civil rights history are often more subtle. For more, we speak with the author of a new book showing how the legacy of the civil rights movement in the U.S. has been distorted and whitewashed for public consumption. Professor and historian Jeanne Theoharis’s new book is titled “A More Beautiful and Terrible History: The Uses and Misuses of Civil Rights History.” She is also the author of the award-winning book The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks."]

---. "On Rosa Parks’ 100th Birthday, Recalling Her Rebellious Life Before and After the Montgomery Bus." Democracy Now (February 4, 2013)

Thompson, Paul. "Terror Timeline." Boiling Frogs (3 Pt interview: September 1, September 6, and September 16, 2011)

Torre, Miguel de la. "Dumping Satan: It’s Time to Let Go." Religion Dispatches (October 26, 2011)

Turse, Nick. "Kill Anything That Moves: New Book Exposes Hidden Crimes of the War Kerry, Hagel Fought in Vietnam." Democracy Now (January 15, 2013)

Vaneigem, Raoul. "The Resistance to Christianity. The Heresies at the Origins of the 18th Century." (1993: archived on the Anarchist Library)

Varon, Jeremy. "Armed Struggle and the New Left." Against the Grain (September 28, 2011)

Venables, Robert. "Who Are These People?(The Onondaga Nation Encounters European Settlers)." Unwelcome Guests #302 (April 16, 2006)

Vetter, Lisa Pace. "Introduction: Political Theory and the Founding of American Feminism." The Political Thought of America's Founding Feminists. New York University Press, 2017: 1-38.

Wade, Lisa. "History Repeating Itself: Discriminatory Voting Laws." Sociological Images (July 1, 2013)

Wall, Richard. "Who's Afraid of Noam Chomsky?" Lew Rockwell (2004)

Walker, Alice. "Celia Sánchez and the Cuban Revolution." Monthly Review (February 2, 2013)

Wallerstein, Immanuel. "Structural Crisis in the World-System: Where Do We Go from Here?" Monthly Review (March 2011)

Waxman, Zoe. "Words of Pain: Interpreting Personal Memories of the Holocaust." Backdoor Broadcasting Company (January 27, 2011)

Webb, Laura. "Landmarks and memory: On the “When separate is not equal” bus." North of Center (November 7, 2012)

Weinberg, Meyer. A Short History of American Capitalism. New History Press, 2003.

West, Cornel. "Black Prophetic Fire: Cornel West on the Revolutionary Legacy of Leading African-American Voices." Democracy Now (October 6, 2014)

West, Stephen. "The Frankfurt School - Introduction." Philosophize This #108 (August 17, 2017) ["The Frankfurt School, also known as the Institute of Social Research (Institut für Sozialforschung), is a social and political philosophical movement of thought located in Frankfurt am Main, Germany. It is the original source of what is known as Critical Theory. The Institute was founded, thanks to a donation by Felix Weil in 1923, with the aim of developing Marxist studies in Germany. The Institute eventually generated a specific school of thought after 1933 when the Nazis forced it to close and move to the United States, where it found hospitality at Columbia University, New York."]

---. "The Frankfurt School (Part 2) - The Enlightenment." Philosophize This #109 (August 26, 2017)

---. "The Frankfurt School (Part 3) - The Culture Industry." Philosophize This #110 (September 7, 2017)

---. "The Frankfurt School (Part 4) - Eros." Philosophize This #111 (October 20, 2017)

---. "The Frankfurt School (Part 5) - Civilization." Philosophize This #112 (November 6, 2017)

---. "The Frankfurt School (Part 6) - Art As a Tool for Liberation." Philosophize This (December 2, 2017)

White, Rob. "Interview with Göran Hugo Olsson." Film Quarterly (Winter 2011)

Whitman, James. "How the Nazis Used Jim Crow Laws as the Model for Their Race Laws." Moyers and Co. (October 13, 2017) ["Bill Moyers in conversation with author James Whitman about his new book Hitler’s American Model: The United States and the Making of Nazi Race Law."]

Wilkerson, Isabel. "Isabel Wilkerson’s Leaderless March that Remade America." Open Source (October 12, 2010) ["Isabel Wilkerson is the epic tale teller of the Great Migration of Southern black people that remade America — sound, substance and spirit — in the 20th Century. The proof is in the soundtrack — musical highlights of a comprehensive revolution. It was one of two modern migrations, it’s been said, that made American culture what it is — of blacks from the Jim Crow South, and of Jews from Central and Eastern Europe. The movement of masses is an ageless, ongoing piece of human history: in India and China today, more people migrate internally from village to city in one year than left the South from the onset of World War I (1915) to the end of the Civil Rights era (1970), as Isabel Wilkerson frames her story. But was there ever a migration that beyond moving people transformed a national culture as ours did? Songs, games, language, art, style, worship, every kind of entertainment including pro sports — in fact almost all we feel about ourselves, how we look to the world, changed in the sweep of Isabel Wilkerson’s magnificent story, The Warmth of Other Suns. Great swaths of the pop and serious culture I grew up in – my children as well – were fruit of Ms. Wilkerson’s story: Jazz and its immortals like Louis Armstrong, Nat King Cole, Illinois Jacquet, Miles Davis, the Basie and Ellington bands and stars like Duke’s greatest soloist Johnny Hodges, whose family moved from Virginia to Boston very early in the century; Mahalia Jackson and Gospel music; Rhythm and Blues, Ray Charles, the Motown sound, the Jackson family and little Michael; sports immortals like Bill Russell and Jackie Robinson, and athletes without number are players in this story. Writers, actors, politicians, comedians… Toni Morison, Spike Lee, Michelle Obama are all children of the Great Migration."]

Wilkerson, Jessica. "Feminism in the Coalfields: What Appalachians of the 1970s Can Teach Today’s Feminists." Rewire (January 26, 2018)

Wilkerson, Lawrence. "I Helped Sell the False Choice of War with Iraq; It’s Happening Again with Iran." Democracy Now (February 9, 2018) ["Fifteen years ago this week, Secretary of State General Colin Powell gave a speech to the United Nations arguing for war with Iraq, saying the evidence was clear: Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction. It was a speech Powell would later call a blot on his career. Is President Trump doing the same thing now with Iran? We speak to Powell’s former chief of staff, Col. Lawrence Wilkerson. He recently wrote a piece titled 'I Helped Sell the False Choice of War Once. It’s Happening Again.'"]

Williams, Kristian. Our Enemies in Blue: Police and Power in America. South End Press, 2007.

Williams, Lauren. "This Black, Gay, Badass Pacifist Mastermind of the March on Washington Is Finally Getting His Due." Mother Jones (August 27, 2013)

Wood, Ellen Meiksins. Democracy Against Capitalism: Renewing Historical MaterialismCambridge University Press, 1995.

Wolff, Richard D. "Jettisoning Accustomed Categories of Thought (Marxian Class Analysis 2) Unwelcome Guests #625 (October 13, 2012)

Wright, Ann and Ed Kinane. "Drones on Trial: 38 Protesters Face Charges for Disrupting Syracuse Base Used in Overseas Attacks." Democracy Now (November 4, 2011)

Wu, Timothy. "America's First Lesson in the Power and Peril of Concentrated Control Over the Flow of Information." Excerpt from The Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires. Alfred A. Knopf, 2010: 22-24.

---. "On the Archetype of the Heroic Inventor." (Excerpt from the The Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires. NY: Alfred A, Knopf, 2010: 18-20.)

Yachot, Noa. "History Shows Activists Should Fear the Surveillance State." Speak Freely (October 27, 2017)

Yaqub, Salim. ""The United States and the Arab World: Sources of Antagonism, Prospects for Accommodation." [MB: A revealing historical background on the US government's alternating relationship with Iraq and Iran.] CHIASMOS (March 9, 2004)

Yoshioka, Maximilian. "History or Humanity? On Lu Chuan's City of Life and Death A Nietzschean Perspective on Nanjing." Bright Lights Film Journal #76 (May 2012)

Young, Ralph. "Dissenting Biographies: A Reading List." From the Square (November 7, 2017)

Yue, Genevieve. "The Curtain’s Undrawn: An Interview with Olivier Assayas on Carlos." Senses of Cinema #57 (2010)

Zander, Ben. "'Rite of Spring' Revival." Radio Open Source (April 22, 2014)

Zinn, Howard (Historian/Playwright/Political Science) ["Howard Zinn was a historian, author, professor, playwright, and activist. His life’s work focused on a wide range of issues including race, class, war, and history, and touched the lives of countless people." source)

Zinn, Howard. Declarations of Independence: Cross-Examining American Ideology. Harper Perennial, 1990.

---. A People's History of the United States: 1492 - The Present. History is a Weapon (Hosting the entire book)

Zuckoff, Mickey. "Lost in Shangri-La." Radio West (August 19, 2011)