Wednesday, April 26, 2017

The World's End (UK/USA/Japan: Edgar Wright, 2013)




The World's End (UK/USA/Japan: Edgar Wright, 2013: 109 mins)

Brand, Scott. "Aftermath: A Few Thoughts on The World’s End as Imagined by Simon Pegg and Edgar Wright." Sequart (February 25, 2016)

---. "The End is Nigh!!!: A Few Thoughts on The World’s End as Imagined by Simon Pegg and Edgar Wright." Sequart (February 18, 2016)

Chen, David. "Edgar Wright and the Art of Close Ups." (Posted on Vimeo: 2014)

Hancock, James and Kyle Reardon. "Edgar Wright's Cornetto Trilogy." Wrong Reel #142 (June 6, 2016)

Jameson, A.D. "25 More Pints: Revisiting The World's End." HTML Giant (September 2, 2013)

Seitz, Matt Zoller. "The World's End." Roger Ebert (August 23, 2013)

Singer, Matt. "The World's End." The Dissolve (August 22, 2013)

The World's End Critics Round Up (Ongoing Archive)

Zhou, Tony. "Edgar Wright: How to Do Visual Comedy." (Posted on Vimeo: May 2014)









Monday, April 17, 2017

The Neon Demon (France/USA/Denmark: Nicholas Refn Winding, 2016)




The Neon Demon (France/USA/Denmark: Nicholas Refn Winding, 2016: 110 mins)


Braier, Natasha. "'I'm Like a Flare Hunter': On The Neon Demon." Filmmaker (November 30, 2016)

Cassidy, Brendan and J.D. Duran. "The Neon DemonDr. Strangelove - Extra Film." In Session (July 1, 2016) 

Fanning, Elle, et al. "Winding Refn - Elle Fanning Interview / De Palma." Filmspotting #591 (June 24, 2016)

Graham, Bill, Brian Roane and Ethan Vestby. "The Neon Demon." The Film Stage #196 (June 28, 2016)

Hancock, James. "The Neon Demon." The Wrong Reel (June 24, 2016)

Harvey, Dennis. "The Neon Demon and the Fear of Women." Keyframe (June 24, 2016)

Hudson, David. "Nicolas Winding Refn's The Neon Demon; 'Nervy feminist provocation or misogynist freakshow?'” Keyframe (May 19, 2016)

Kacprzak, Mikolaj. "The Silent Gaze." (Posted on Vimeo: September 2016)

Kermode, Mark. "The Neon Demon: Beauty as the Beast." The Guardian (July 10, 2016)

Koski, Genevieve, et al. "The Neon Demon/Suspiria, Pt. 1." The Next Picture Show #35 (July 12, 2016) ["Nicholas Winding Refn’s new THE NEON DEMON inspired us to look back at another tale of female rivalry that plays out in lurid colors and more than a little violence: Dario Argento’s classic 1977 horror movie SUSPIRIA. In this half, we explore the specific, lurid style in which Argento works, and consider how it functions as both cinema and horror. "]

---. "The Neon Demon/Suspiria, Pt. 2." The Next Picture Show #36 (July 14, 2016) ["We move our conversation of Dario Argento's 1977 film SUSPIRIA to Nicholas Winding Refn’s THE NEON DEMON, which works as a contemporary companion piece. In this half, we talk over the two films' respective uses of color, violence, and female competition."]
Martinez, Cliff. "Neon Demon." The Treatment (June 8, 2016) ["Cliff Martinez has strong roots in rock music, having begun his career as the drummer of Red Hot Chili Peppers. But, after reflecting on his love for the soundtrack of A Fistful of Dollars, Martinez broadened his musical scope as film composer behind scores for such films and television series as Spring Breakers, Sex, Lies and Videotape and The Knick. He joins Elvis Mitchell to discuss his personal music history and the thought process behind his latest musical work on Neon Demon."]

The Neon Demon Critics Round Up (Ongoing Archive)

"Nicolas Winding Refn." The Close-Up #90 (June 29, 2016)

Paul, Jacob. "The Current Debate: Seeing and Believing in The Neon Demon." Notebook (June 29, 2016)

Refn, Nicholas Winding. "The Neon Demon." The Cinema Show (July 8, 2016)

Stark, Clinton. "The Neon Demon: Critic wants to ban Nicolas Winding Refn’s film, protect England from 'depravity." Stark Insider (June 7, 2016)

Swinney, Jacob T. "12 Essential Women Cinematographers." Keyframe (August 10, 2016)


























Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Moonlight (USA: Barry Jenkins, 2016)




Moonlight (USA: Barry Jenkins, 2016: 110 mins)


Adalat, Haroon. "Barry Before Moonlight: Much of what made this Best Picture so special also can be found in Barry Jenkins' earlier work." Keyframe (March 3, 2017)

Adams, Amy, et al. "Watch Isabelle Huppert, Emma Stone, Amy Adams & More Discuss Acting in 50-Minute Roundtable."  Film Stage (January 30, 2017) [" Isabelle Huppert (Elle), Emma Stone (La La Land), Amy Adams (Arrival), Natalie Portman (Jackie), Naomie Harris (Moonlight), Annette Bening (20th Century Women), and Taraji P. Henson (Hidden Figures)."]

Als, Hilton. "Moonlight Undoes Our Expectations." The New Yorker (October 24, 2016)

Art of the Title. "Know Your 2017 Below-the-Line Oscar Nominees." The Film Stage (January 30, 2017) ["The major below-the-line categories are Cinematography, Production Design, Sound Editing/Mixing, Visual Effects, Costume Design, and Makeup and Hairstyling . On the best productions (including those that the Academy labels Best Picture), the work of these crucial visual elements often blend together so seamlessly that it's hard to pick their creators' work.Thankfully, Art of The Film has created a series of supercuts called Oscars in One Minute that isolate the work of these artists so we can fully recognize their importance and beauty within each respective production."]

Atad, Corey. "Talking with Moonlight's Trevante Rhodes: For this young actor, reflecting on a breakthrough role, it's all about the empathy." Keyframe (October 20, 2016)

Bordwell, David. "Fantasy, flashbacks, and what-ifs: 2016 pays off the past." Observations on Film Art (January 2, 2017)

Brody, Richard. "The Unbearable Intimacy of Moonlight." The New Yorker (October 28, 2016)

Brubaker, Philip. "Oscar to Oscar: Black Auteurs and the Academy." Keyframe (February 9, 2017)

Buder, Emily. "Moonlight: Barry Jenkins on Why the Exquisite Film Nearly Killed Him." No Film School (October 10, 2016)

Clark, Ashley, Violet Lucca and Amy Taubin. "Identity." Film Comment (January 17, 2017) ["Ideology and aesthetics have somehow come to be positioned opposite one another—in film criticism, should one be privileged over the other? This episode of The Film Comment Podcast discusses how race, ethnicity, and other markers of identity factor into film criticism and cinema generally. FC Digital Editor Violet Lucca unpacks the topic with Amy Taubin, Contributing Editor to FC and Artforum, and Ashley Clark, FC contributor and programmer, in a conversation that spans multiple decades of film history—from Taxi Driver to OJ: Made in America to Notting Hill to I Am Not Your Negro, to the canceled Michael Jackson episode of Urban Myths starring Joseph Fiennes."]

Clifton, Derrick. "Why Moonlight Should Win Best Picture at the Oscars." NBC News (January 24, 2017)

Eggert, Brian. "Moonlight (2016)." Deep Focus Review (November 20, 2016)

Ferdinand, Marilyn. "Moonlight (2016)." Ferdy on Films (November 9, 2016)

Jasper, Marykate. "These Tone-Deaf Reviews of Moonlight and Hidden Figures Are Why We Need Critics of Color." The Mary Sue (February 19, 2017)

Jenkins, Barry. "Moonlight." IndieWire Filmmaker Toolkit (October 21, 2016)

Kacprzak, Mikolaj. "Behind Moonlight." (Posted on Vimeo: March 2017)

Koski, Genvieve, et al. "In the Mood for Love / Moonlight, Part 1." The Next Picture Show #51 (November 22, 2016) ["Inspired by one of the year’s biggest indie sensations, Barry Jenkins’ MOONLIGHT, we’re looking at another highly romanticized tale of unrequited love: Wong Kar-wai’s beautiful 2000 film IN THE MOOD FOR LOVE. In this half, we talk about how affecting LOVE’s central non-love-story is - and why - and consider how the film reflects Wong’s improvisational methods and his desire to create a dreamlike return to the Hong Kong of his childhood."]

---. "In the Mood for Love / Moonlight, Part 2." The Next Picture Show #52 (November 24, 2016) ["Our discussion of lyrical portraits of unrequited love turns its attention to Barry Jenkins’ MOONLIGHT, the look and feel of which—the final third in particular—recalls the bittersweet tone of Wong Kar-Wai’s IN THE MOOD FOR LOVE. We share our reactions to MOONLIGHT, and consider the two films’ shared qualities, including their use of unusual framing and the thematic importance placed on food."]

Marinacci, Alesso. "Moonlight and Wong Kar Wai." (Posted on Youtube: Posted January 28, 2017)

May, Kate Torgovnick. "How Color Helps a Movie Tell a Story." TED (April 5, 2017)

Moonlight Critics Round Up (Ongoing Archive)

Ramos-Taylor, Zachary. "The Intimate Look." (Posted on Vimeo: March 2017)

Schotz, Mal. "How to Praise Moonlight." Situation Critical (November 5, 2016)

Scott, A.O. "Moonlight: Is This the Year's Best Movie." The New York Times (October 20, 2016)

Shoard, Catherine. Should Critics of Moonlight Be Hounded for Having an Opinion." The Guardian (February 22, 2017)

Sims, David. "Moonlight is a Film of Uncommon Grace." The Atlantic (October 26, 2016)

Smith, Nathan. "Chopped and Screwed: This hip-hop subgenre could be the best thing that's happened to movies in years." Keyframe (March 21, 2017)

Swinney, Jacob T. "Reoccurring Imagery in Moonlight." (Posted on Vimeo: March 2017)

Tallerico, Brian. "Moonlight." Roger Ebert (October 21, 2016)

Zaman, Farihah and Nicolas Rapold. "Song of Myself." Film Comment (September/October 2016) ["Barry Jenkins confirms his talent with a heartwrenching and gorgeous portrait of a man grappling with his sexuality in a rough corner of Miami"]








































































Monday, April 10, 2017

Get Out (USA: Jordan Peele, 2017)




Get Out (USA: Jordan Peele, 2017: 103 mins)

Alcoff, Linda Martin. Visible Identities: Race, Gender and the Self. Oxford University Press, 2006.

Appen, Joe Von and Erik McClanahan. "Get Out / I Don't Feel at Home In This World." Adjust Your Tracking #141 (March 9, 2017)

Bakare, Lanra. "Get Out: The Film That Dares to Reveal Liberal Racism in America." The Guardian (February 28, 2017)

Brooks, Kinitra. "What Becky Gotta Do to Get Murked? White Womanhood in Jordan Peele's Get Out." Very Smart Brothers (March 3, 2017)

Butler, Bethonie. "The Brilliant Casting of Jordan Peele's Get Out." The Washington Post (March 9, 2017)

Chack, Erin. "22 Secrets Hidden in Get Out That You May Have Missed." Buzz Feed (March 3, 2017)

Colburn, Randall. "Horror and Race: How Jordan Peele’s Get Out Flips the Script." CoS (February 26, 2017)

Dowd, A.A. "Jordan Peele shifts from comedy to horror with the smart, cutting Get Out." A.V. Club (February 23, 2017)

Get Out Critics Round Up (Ongoing Archive)

"Get Out Syllabus."

Harris, Brandon. "The Giant Leap Forward of Jordan Peele's Get Out." The New Yorker (March 4, 2017)

Hoberman, J."A Real American Horror Story." The New York Review of Books (March 13, 2017)

"Jordan Peele: The Art of the Social Thriller." BAM (Film series curated by the director: February/March 2017)

Novak, A.M. "Not Your Trophy: Deer Imagery in Jordan Peele's Get Out." Vague Visages (March 22, 2017)

Parham, Jason. "Get Out Proves The Only Way To Battle White Supremacy Is To Kill It." Fader (March 8, 2017)

Phipps, Keith, Tasha Robinson and Scott Tobias. "Get Out / People Under the Stairs (Pt. 1)." The Next Picture Show #66 (March 7, 2017)

---. "Get Out / People Under the Stairs (Pt. 2)." The Next Picture Show #67 (March 9, 2017)

Oliver, Toby. "Interview with Get Out Cinematographer." Following Films (March 7, 2017)

Peele, Jordan. "Jordan Peele Gets Into Horror." Still Following (March 2, 2017)  ["It’s not hard to explain the premise of “Get Out.” A woman (Allison Williams) takes her boyfriend (Daniel Kaluuya) home to meet her parents (Catherine Keener and Bradley Whitford). He’s black, she and her parents are white — like, liberal white, good white. They’re totally down. What’s complicated to talk about with this film — the No. 1 movie in the country, by the way — is where the racial horror and the comedy take us and where they come from. It’s funny, scary, shocking and sad."]

Thrasher, Steven. "Why Get Out Is the Best Movie Ever Made About American Slavery: Jordan Peele's horror film is about the theft of black bodies—but it isn't set in the Antebellum South." Esquire (March 1, 2017)

White, Armond. "Return of the Get Whitey Movie." National Review (February 24, 2017)

Wilkinson, Alissa. "Get Out is a horror film about benevolent racism. It's spine-chilling." Vox (February 25, 2017)

Wittmer, Carrie. "Why this new horror movie has a rare perfect score from critics — and you need to see it." Business Insider (February 23, 2017)

Yancy, George. "Whiteness as Ambush and the Transformative Power of Vigilance." Black Bodies, White Gazes: The Continuing Significance of Race. Rowan and Littlefield, 2008: 227-247.



































Friday, April 7, 2017

ENG 102 - The Stories We Tell: Ways of Seeing

[Building an archive of resources for a section in my ENG 102 courses designed to develop critical historical thinking, ethical framing and narrative awareness. How and why we tell stories - praxis, mappings, analysis, critiques, deconstruction, revisions, transformations and censorship. From how we treat our selves, to the interactions of individuals and smaller groups, to social movements seeking social justice, to the policies/effects of larger social/political structures, and ranging across broader regional/global conflicts. Historical/contemporary non-fiction/fiction/art. Emphasis on a people's history as an alternative to the limited narratives of the dominant corporate media. The archive is an ongoing project!]
Ethics and politics look at both how we should regard and accommodate each other and what kind of things make it possible to, for example, treat each other with respect and what kinds of things don't. That I might view you as "weird" or even "inhuman" (politics) may very much dictate how I then treat you (ethics). When we examine more closely how we think about the world, it turns out that ethics and politics are inseparable. (21) -- Veronique Pin-Fat "How Do We Begin to Think About the World." (2014)
Until the lion has his historian," the African proverb goes, "the hunter will always be a hero." (quoted in Fear of an Animal Planet, 2010) 
Čapek, Karel. "From the Point of View of a Cat." (Originally published 1935: reposted on Tumblr, June 11, 2016)
"How do images affect our hearts and minds? How do images influence our everyday lives, our techno-scientific practices, our connections and disconnections, our conscious and unconscious desires and fears? How do images show up in the clothes we wear, in the ways we walk, and the objects we want? How do images influence the foods we eat or don’t eat and the ideas and feelings we have about our selves and others? How do some images enter our flesh, captivate us, fascinate us, or arouse our senses? How is it that other images put us to sleep? How do images inform our habits and fantasies, pleasures and doubts, worries and joys, rituals and rebellions? How do images shape our personal, political, cultural, moral, and religious beliefs about nature and about justice? How do images influence what we imagine to be possible and what’s not? Visual images are today everywhere entangled within a complex and contradictory web of global electronic flows of information. Images are typically racialized, gendered, territorialized, eroticized, militarized, and class-driven. Some of the most powerful images are hooked-up to hi-tech machineries of war, surveillance, and the economic marketplace. Images also lie at the core of global corporate technologies of profit, control and advantage. How might such images be best understood? How might they be critically subverted, transformed, or remade?" -- Stephen Pfohl, "Images and Power" (2011) 
Cinderella is a horrific story about a rich girl whose evil stepmother forced her to live as though she were a member of the working class. - Existential Comics (posted on Facebook)
People who do not tell stories well, listen to stories effectively and learn to deconstruct those stories with a skeptical ear will be more apt to be victims of … exploitation and power games. Stories have many interpretations. If one interpretation gets pasted over all the rest and becomes a dominant or the only political acceptable way to interpret events, we have ideology, domination, and disempowerment. Part of exploitation is to deny an interpretation, point of view, or experience, that differs from the dominant view. Rhetoric about healthy, happy, and terrific harmony and unity can mask just the opposite reality. A simple sounding moral or prescription about consensus or teamwork can mask deeper costs in terms of power and domination. (339)

Story Deconstruction Method
1. Duality Search. Make a list of any bipolar terms, any dichotomies that are used in the story. Include the term even if only one side is mentioned.
2. Reinterpret. A story is one interpretation of an event from one point of view. Write out an alternative interpretation using the same story particulars.
3. Rebel Voices. Deny the authority of the one voice. What voices are being expressed in this story? Which voices are subordinate or hierarchical to other voices?
4. Other Side of the Story. Stories always have two sides. What is the [other] side of the story (usually a marginalized, under-represented, or even silent) …?
5. Deny the Plot. Stories have plots, scripts, scenarios, recipes, and morals. Turn these around.
6. Find the Exception. What is the exception that breaks the rule, that does not fit the recipe, that escapes the scrictures of the principle? State the rule in a way that makes it seem extreme or absurd.
7. State What is Between the Lines. What is not said? What is the writing on the wall? Fill in the blanks. … What are you filling in? With what alternate way[s] could you fill it in? (340)
Boje, David M. and Robert F. Dennehy. Managing in the Postmodern World: America’s Revolution Against Exploitation. Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Publishing, 1999.
It's weird how many people think the word "unbiased" means something along the lines of "supporting the status quo". -- Existential Comics (April 17, 2017)
"The truth is, when all is said and done, one does not teach a subject, one teaches a student how to learn it." - Jacques Barzun, "Reasons to De-Test the Schools," New York Times (1988-10-11), later published in Begin Here: The Forgotten Conditions of Teaching and Learning (1991) 
Baker, Mark R. "Tips for Better Writing." History 350 (Koç University, Fall 2016)
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Abram, David, et al. "How To Think About Science, Parts 1 - 24." Ideas (January 2, 2012)

Abrams, Jenessa. "Written in Chalk: What It Means to Be Crazy." The Rumpus (April 17, 2017)

A Class Divided Frontline (March 26, 1985) ["The day after Martin Luther King, Jr. was killed, a teacher in a small town in Iowa tried a daring classroom experiment. She decided to treat children with blue eyes as superior to children with brown eyes. FRONTLINE explores what those children learned about discrimination and how it still affects them today."]

Adler, Renata, et al. "David Foster Wallace, FTW: Life in the Internet Age." Open Source (August 25, 2016)

Alcoff, Linda Martin. Visible Identities: Race, Gender and the Self. Oxford University Press, 2006.

Alderman, Naomi. "Dystopian Dreams: How Feminist Science Fiction Predicted the Future." The Guardian (March 25, 2017) ["From Mary Shelley to Margaret Atwood, feminist science fiction writers have imagined other ways of living that prompt us to ask, could we do things differently?"]

Alexander Jonathan. "What Feeds the Imagination: Jonathan Alexander Interviews Kenneth Kidd." Los Angeles Review of Books (April 6, 2017)

Alshaibi, Usama. "Nice Bombs & American Arab." Indie Beat (March 8, 2017)  ["Our guest is filmmaker/teacher Usama Alshaibi, an Iraqi-American located in Boulder, Colorado. In 2003, the director went to US-occupied Baghdad and shot his first feature-length documentary “Nice Bombs.” Part political non-fiction and part video diary, the movie is both a layered look at the Iraq War and a unique, intimate look at a place (and people) that are unfortunately not offered such a profile in other films observing the post-9/11 world. ... Afterwards Alshaibi made a number of short films and hit another pulse with his second documentary “American Arab” which deals with bigotry in the US. The filmmaker profiles a number of people, discussing their day-to-day experience when everyone thinks you’re the enemy. A considerable portion of the movie also details the brutal assault that Alshaibi experienced, himself a victim of racism. At the moment the director is preparing his third feature, “Boy From War,” which will look back on his time living in Iraq during their war with Iran, and it will feature animation similar to “Waltz With Bashir.” On the podcast we spoke about the negative perception of Arabs and Muslims, film and TV’s role in perpetuating it, the exhaustion of fighting it, filmmaking as a father, and the power of animation."]

Alter, Adam. "The Rise of Addictive Technology." Radio West (April 17, 2017)  ["Marketing professor Adam Alter begins his new book by noting that Steve Jobs didn’t let his own children use an iPad, a product he invented, because he was worried they’d get addicted to it. That’s what Alter’s book is about: our increasing addiction to technology. These days, we aren’t just hooked on substances, like drugs and alcohol. We’re addicted to video games, social media, porn, email, and lots more. Alter joins us Monday to explore the business and psychology of irresistible technologies."]

Alter, Alexandra, David Higgins and Christopher Robichaud. "A Fictive, Failing Dystopian Future." On Point (April 3, 2017)

Alwan, Wes, et al. "Alexis de Tocqueville on Democracy in America." The Partially Examined Life #152 (November 21, 2016) ["Democracy is in peril! So said Tocqueville in 1835 and 1840 when Democracy is America was published, and so would he likely say now. Democracy is always just one demagogue away from stripping us of our liberties, though certain structural and cultural features can make that more or less likely. Tocqueville liked our spirit of volunteerism, our civic activeness, our energy and inventiveness and competitiveness, and the pervasiveness of religion (at the time) in American culture. But he didn't like our groupthink, our tendencies toward materialism and caring only about our own small circle (what he called "individualism"), our lack of philosophical curiosity, and was in favor of a strong separation between church and state. He thought that people in a democracy value equality over freedom, and that in the absence of a strong spiritual countervailing force, we'd spend more energy pursuing material comfort and so would be more likely to allow a tyrant who promises this to us to take control. He also feared the rise of a new aristocracy out of the business world, with bosses becoming the new de facto lords. Then again, he also feared a race war and thought for sure that if the South tried to secede, the federal government would be too weak to prevent this, so there's that."]

"Anarchist Monopoly." Existential Comics (March 2017)

Anderson, Chloe and David Squires. "U.S. Healthcare from a Global Perspective: Spending, Use of Services, Prices, and Health in 13 Countries." The Commonwealth Fund (October 8, 2015)

"Appeals Court Affirms Order to Remove Confederate Monuments." Southern Poverty Law Center (March 7, 2017)

Archives of Individual Films Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

Archives of the Films, By Decade, The Do Not Have an Individual Post Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

Arnade, Chris, Jim O'Grady and Kai Wright. "Race, Class, and the United States of Anxiety." On the Media (October 19, 2016)

Aslan, Reza. "Believer." WTF (March 23, 2017) ["Religious scholar Reza Aslan has spent his life studying the facts and misconceptions about belief and the evolutionary reasons people need to believe in something larger than themselves. Beginning with his family fleeing a religious revolution in Iran, then landing in Oklahoma as a child and growing up in a Latino community in San Jose, Reza talks with Marc about his lifelong exploration of faith, including the findings of his new documentary series, Believer."]

Ayres, Jackson. "The X-Men and the Legacy of AIDS." The Los Angeles Review of Books (September 21, 2016)

Bailey, Jason. "The Trippiest Movies Ever Made." (Posted on Vimeo: 2012)

Barnes, Christopher. "Representing Incarceration in Persons of Interest and The Oath." Jump Cut #57 (Fall 2016)


Bauer-Wolf, Jeremy. "Students with Sugar Daddies." Inside Higher Education (April 17, 2017)

Beauvoir, Simon de. The Second Sex. Trans. Constance Borde. Vintage, 2011.

Becker, Snowden. "Police Body Cameras and Evidentiary Videos." The Cinephiliacs #83 (August 14, 2016) ["While this show has often staked its interest in the kinds of audiovisual materials we come to praise as art, there are many different types of moving image materials out there. None feels more pertinent to our moment today than the discussions around the introduction of police body-worn cameras alongside the amateur videos that display evidence of police brutality toward members of the African American community. To address these topics is often to approach them from one of politics, but a surrounding series of questions deals with many of the same questions that cinema-minded people might find familiar: what can we learn from analyzing how they were made? What elements are manipulation are present? How will these videos be stored? What access should the public have? What is the emotional affect of viewing them?"]

Berger, John. Ways of Seeing. (1972 BBC Series based on Berger's landmark book on art and perspective: four 30 minute episodes)

Blyth, Mark, David Kaiser and Vanessa Williamson. "The French Sensation: Income Inequality in the United States, 1910 - 2010." Open Source (May 1, 2014) ["The hottest book everybody is talking about, that no one has read and no can get their hands on, is a giant, data-packed tome on income inequality covering three hundred years of history by the French economist Thomas Piketty. Is there a reason he’s getting the rock star treatment? Is it the symptoms that resonate (our drift into oligarchy), or is it the cure (a progressive tax on wealth)?"]

Boehm, Peter, et al. "The Challenge of Peace." Ideas (February 8, 2017) ["We have the best communications in history, except for the kind that matters - nations and states understanding each other. What values might we agree on? What ideas about society do we have in common? Has there been progress of any sort?"]

Botton, Alain De. "The True Hard Work of Love and Relationships." On Being (February 9, 2017) ["What if the first question we asked on a date were, “How are you crazy? I’m crazy like this”? Philosopher and writer Alain de Botton’s essay “Why You Will Marry the Wrong Person” was, amazingly, the most-read article in The New York Times in the news-drenched year of 2016. As people and as a culture, he says, we would be much saner and happier if we reexamined our very limited view of love. How might our relationships be different — and better — if we understood that the real work of love is not in the falling, but in what comes after?"]

Bowcott, Owen. "Opening of UN Files on Holocaust will 'Rewrite Chapters of History.'" The Guardian (April 17, 2017)

Branch, Ashanti, et al. "Man Up." To the Best of Our Knowledge (January 8, 2017) ["Be strong, be tough, don’t cry – boys are bombarded with messages about being a man and the “male code” beginning around five or six years old. By high school, it’s second nature. But it can also be toxic. Because boys in America today aren’t doing so well. Compared to girls, they’re more likely to get diagnosed with a behavior disorder, drop out of school, binge drink, commit a violent crime, even kill themselves. So is that what it means to “man up”? "]

Briggs, Charles. "Race and Racial Politics in Health News." Against the Grain (February 15, 2017) ["How are race and ethnicity represented in U.S. news coverage of health and medicine? Charles Briggs argues that whiteness tends to be portrayed as an aspirational state of well-being, while people of color are far too often depicted as deficient, as trapped by culture and thus to be blamed for their own health problems."]

Brookes, Chris, et al. "Vestigial Tales, Pt. 1." Ideas (August 11, 2016) ["Analysing stories is usually territory claimed by writers, critics, and university scholars. But recently, evolutionary psychologists have begun to look at the human propensity for storytelling from a scientific perspective. Why are we humans such suckers for a good story? Literary critics find the answer in story structure, characters, and plotlines. The literary Darwinists find the answer in evolution. Documentary-maker Chris Brookes looks at the evolutionary origins of human storytelling."]

Brooks, Jon. "What Is Propaganda? Noam Chomsky on Media, Manipulation, and Democracy." High Existence (July 2016)

Buddicom, Jacintha, et al. "The Orwell Tapes, Pt. 1." Ideas (December 1, 2016) ["He was a brilliant, eccentric, complicated man; a colonial policeman, a critic and journalist, a dishwasher, a fighter in the Spanish civil war, a teacher and a shopkeeper - and one of the most influential writers of our time. His name was Eric Blair, better known as George Orwell. Who was the man who gave us 'big brother', 'thoughtcrime', 'doublethink', whose name looms so large in this era of mass surveillance? Steve Wadhams delves into recordings he made with the people who knew Orwell from his earliest days to his final moments."]

Callaghan, Ann, Annie Sprinkle and Beth Stephens. We're All a Little Ecosexual." Outside (October 5, 2016)

Carlin, Dan. "A Bodyguard of Lies." Common Sense #309 (September 9, 2016)  ["Secrecy, hacking, information leaks, whistle-blowers, foreign-operative propaganda pushers, disinformation, election tampering and the search for any truth in cyberspace occupy Dan's thoughts in this show."]

---. "Unhealthy Numbers." Common Sense #314 (March 15, 2017) ["As the GOP attempts to repeal the Affordable Care Act, Dan ponders the dichotomy between what Americans spend on health care versus what they get in return."]

Carlsson, Chris and Susan Rosenthal. "Nowtopia and DIY Activism (Power and Powerlessness #1).  Unwelcome Guests #424 (August 17, 20008)  ["Susan Rosenthal, a physician and psychotherapist who reached the conclusion after decades of research, observation and activism that social power is necessary for human health. We'll also hear, in a similar vein, an interview with writer and DIY activist Chris Carlsson about his new book "Nowtopia"."]

Chen, Adrian. "The Propaganda About Russian Propaganda." The New Yorker (December 1, 2016)

Chomsky, Noam. Understanding Power: The Indispensable Noam Chomsky. The New Press, 2002.

Cobb, Charles E., Jr. "Guns and the Southern Freedom Struggle: What’s Missing When We Teach About Nonviolence." Teaching a People's History (September 22, 2014)

Cohen, Jeffrey Jerome. "Monster Culture (Seven Theses)." Monster Theory: Reading Culture. University of Minnesota Press, 1996: 3 - 25.

Colman, Dan. "High School Teacher & Holocaust Expert Suspended for Drawing Parallels Between Trump & Hitler’s Rhetoric." Open Culture (November 13, 2016)

Conway, Erik M. and Naomi Oreskes. "Doubt is Our Product." and "The Denial of Global Warming." Merchants of Doubt: How a Handful of Scientists Obscured The Truth on Issues from Tobacco Smoke to Global Warming. Bloomsbury, 2010: 10-35; 66-106; 169-215; 216-239.

Costa, Cassie Da, et al. "Mondo, Mondo." Film Comment (July 26, 2016) ["This month, at Anthology Film Archives, FILM COMMENT contributor Nick Pinkerton has programmed a variety of shockumentary-style works ranging from the notorious Mondo Cane(an Academy Award nominee, for Original Song) to Thierry Zéno’s Des Morts. Many of these films aim to shock and titillate, sometimes purporting to document actual deaths, but they become politically and culturally revealing texts. None of this problematic entertainment holds a candle, however, to the real-life horror that has become a fixture of 21st-century visual culture: recordings showing police brutality—grim evidence of actual violence that is used in calls for justice. In a wide-ranging discussion that moves from the cinema of taboo to the complexities of recordings of police violence, FC Digital Editor Violet Lucca spoke with Pinkerton, critic and programmer Ashley Clark, and New Yorker video producer (and former FC intern) Cassie da Costa."]

Crips and Bloods: Made in America (USA: Stacy Peralta, 2008: 93 mins) ["With a first-person look at the notorious Crips and Bloods, this film examines the conditions that have lead to decades of devastating gang violence among young African Americans growing up in South Los Angeles."  MB here - I've had two students in the last week cite John Sowers' book 'Fatherless Generation: Redeeming the Story' as an authority in making the claim that "fatherlessness" is the main reason we have gangs in America. I found this claim to be problematic and overstated (if not ridiculous - no doubt it could add to the problem, but the primary reason?). A simple perusal of Sowers background and position will clue one in to his obvious agenda, but for the purposes of the learning experience I wanted to discuss what source he was using to make this grandiose claim. He cites Stacy Peralta's 2008 documentary 'Crips and Bloods: Made in America' as the source for his claim. Now I have seen this film at least a dozen times (I teach it) and it is a complex exploration of the historical discrimination, geographical segregation, predatory policing and socioeconomic conditions that have led to the origination and rise of these two gangs in this region. The first 30 minutes of the documentary demolishes Sowers' sloppy argument of fatherlessness as the primary cause - it is a great documentary for those interested in the history of these gangs and urban conditions. https://youtu.be/qN4pP-1NWoA  ]

Cromwell, David and David Edwards. "BBC Propaganda Watch: Tell-Tale Signs That Slip Through The Cracks." Media Lens (December 13, 2016)

Davis, Wade. "The Wayfinders: Why Ancient Knowledge Matters in the Modern World." (Posted on Vimeo: 2012)

Denniss, Richard and Julie Nelson. "It's the Economists, Stupid." Ideas (November 28, 2016) ["Interest rates. Unemployment. GDP. Markets. Austerity measures. Economists tell us what we, as societies, can and can't afford. But how do they decide? What values are at play? IDEAS producer Mary O'Connell speaks with two economists about how modern mantras on the economy limit our choices and shut down civic debate."]

Dickey, Colin. "Oliver and Sarah: The Story of the Winchesters." The Los Angeles Review of Books (September 28, 2015)

Dimaggio, Anthony. "Post-Fact Politics: Reviewing the History of Fake News and Propaganda." Counterpunch (December 6, 2016)

Early, Steve. "Richmond vs. Chevron." Against the Grain (April 24, 2017) ["In the age of Trump — and before him, of Obama — change from the top seems far out of reach for progressives. Some have drawn from the past and have struggled from the bottom up for a just city, perhaps the premier case being Richmond, California. Journalist Steve Early talks about Richmond, Chevron, labor — and the challenges of creating socialism in one city. He also discusses the history of leftwing municipal reformism."]

Eddington, Patrick G. "GAO Weighs In On 'Countering Violent Extremism.'” Cato at Liberty (April 17, 2017)

"The Edelweiss Pirates, 1939-1945." Libcom (September 3, 2006) ["An account of the Edelweiss Pirates, a World War II era German anti-Nazi movement of working class youth who fought against the regime."]

Edwards, David. "Fake News about 'Fake News': The Media Performance Pyramid." Media Lens (December 5, 2016)

---. "Filtering the Election." Media Lens (November 18, 2016)

Elmi, Rooney. "Women in Revolt: An International Women's Day Film Syllabus." Notebook (March 8, 2017)

Falk, Richard. "In Historic Report, U.N. Agency Says Israel Is Imposing an 'Apartheid Regime' on Palestinian People." Democracy Now (March 16, 2017)

Fanon, Frantz. Black Skin, White Masks(1952) Trans. Charles Lam Markmann. Pluto Press, 2008.

---. The Wretched of the Earth. (1961) Trans. Richard Wilcox. Grover Press, 2004.

Federici, Sylvia. Caliban and the Witch.  Autonomedia, 2004.

"Ferguson Protests/Black Lives Matter/Baltimore Protests 2014 - 2016: Peace and Conflict Studies Archive (Ongoing)." Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

Flynn, Tera, et al. "Ireland 1916: How 800 years of British rule led to violent rebellion." Ideas (April 4, 2017) ["On Easter Monday, April 24, 1916, the streets of Dublin were transformed into a war zone. About 1,200 Irish rebels rose up against 20,000 British troops in a doomed attempt to throw off centuries of British colonial rule. The Easter Rising may have failed in that moment, but the brutality of the British response so disgusted and angered the people of Ireland that Irish independence became inevitable."]

Forencich, Frank. "A New Warrior Activist." The Exuberant Animal (November 14, 2016)

Foucault, Michel. The Archaeology of Knowledge. Trans. A.M. Sheridan Smith. Pantheon Books, 1972.

Fox, Neil and Dario Linares. "Knowing Sounds: Podcasting as Academic Practice." The Cinematologists #32 (November 10, 2016) ["Knowing Sounds is an experimental podcast exploring the possibilities and outcomes of using the podcast medium as a creative practice underpinned by conceptual thought to produce and disseminate academic research. The podcast, which more specifically can be defined as an audio essay, is split into three sections. The first is an experimental collage of music, dialogue and sound effects from a selection of films which are interwoven with excerpts from audience members who attended The Cinematologists live screenings. It is designed to open up questions as to the potential for a sonic landscape to tap into the ‘cinematic imagination’ without the use of images. We thus play with aural engagement creating a space for the listener to actively negotiate the binary between the abstract emotions and intended rational meaning inferred through listening. The second section is a spoken analysis of the potential of podcasting as an academic form exploring how the mechanics sound production and dissemination in the digital age can challenge the powerful logocentric link between knowledge and writing. We also interrogate the structural formation that, paradoxically, has given rise to the ubiquity of podcasts in mainstream culture but has undermined its potential development. Furthermore, interweaving illustrative references, we analyse specific film podcasts and how they utilise a developing grammar of sonic writing to expand cultural discourse. The final section brings together other contributors to the journal of disrupted media practice who comment on their alternative methods of production and exhibition aimed at unsettling assumptions about the relationship between practice and theory."]

Fromm, Erich. The Anatomy of Human Destructiveness. Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1973.

---. The Sane Society. Routledge, 1991.

"From Tree to Shining Tree." Radiolab (July 30, 2016) ["A forest can feel like a place of great stillness and quiet. But if you dig a little deeper, there’s a hidden world beneath your feet as busy and complicated as a city at rush hour. In this story, a dog introduces us to a strange creature that burrows beneath forests, building an underground network where deals are made and lives are saved (and lost) in a complex web of friendships, rivalries, and business relations. It’s a network that scientists are only just beginning to untangle and map, and it’s not only turning our understanding of forests upside down, it’s leading some researchers to rethink what it means to be intelligent."]

Gaiman, Neil. "How Stories Last." The Long Now Foundation (June 9, 2015)

Galvin, Claire. "Male Veteran Sexual Assault Survivors Speak Out." The Daily Campus (March 28, 2017)

Goodman, Barak. "Ruby Ridge." Radio West (February 14, 2017) ["In August 1992, a tense and disastrous event took place at Ruby Ridge in northern Idaho. The family of Randy Weaver had been holed up for months with a cache of firearms at their mountaintop home. He was wanted for a federal offense, and when U.S. Marshals surveilling the property crossed paths with the Weavers, a firefight broke out. The ensuing standoff mesmerized the country and inflamed anti-government sentiment. ... we’re talking about what happened at Ruby Ridge and its resonance today."]

Gooley, Tristan. "The Lost Art of Natural Navigation." Radio West (November 23, 2016)  ["Nowadays, there are all kinds of devices to help us find our way through the world. But before all that stuff, before even cartography, humankind was navigating with nature as the guide. The adventurer Tristan Gooley is committed to recovering and teaching the lost arts natural navigation. Rocks, trees, grass, ducks, puddles, clouds, and the wind are all compass hands to him. Gooley joins us Wednesday to share what he’s learned about natural navigation and the joys of learning nature’s subtle signs. Tristan Gooley is the author of several books about natural navigation, including The Lost Art of Reading Nature’s Signs and his newest, How to Read Water. He is the only living person to have piloted small aircraft and sailed single-handedly across the Atlantic, and he’s a Fellow of the Royal Institute of Navigation and the Royal Geographical Society."]

Gottlieb, Anthony. "On Pierre Bayle." Philosophy Bites (December 2, 2016) ["Pierre Bayle was one of the most famous and respected philosophers of his day, but few today know much about him. Anthony Gottlieb, author of a recent book about the early Enlightenment, The Dream of Enlightenment, argues that Bayle should be better known, particularly for his views on religious toleration, scepticism, and the secular state."]

Grann, David. "Largely Forgotten Osage Murders Reveal A Conspiracy Against Wealthy Native Americans." Fresh Air (April 17, 2017) ["Members of the Osage Indian Nation became very wealthy in the 1920s after oil deposits were found on their land. Then local whites began targeting the tribe. Journalist David Grann tells the story."]

Greenhouse, Linda. "The Bittersweet Victories of Women." The New York Review of Books (May 26, 2016)

---. "How Smart Women Got the Chance." The New York Review of Books (April 6, 2017)

Greenwald, Glenn. "Anonymous Leaks to the WashPost About the CIA’s Russia Beliefs Are No Substitute for Evidence." The Intercept (December 10, 2016)

---. "Russia Hysteria Infects WashPost Again: False Story About Hacking U.S. Electric Grid." The Intercept (December 31, 2016)

---. "WashPost Is Richly Rewarded for False News About Russia Threat While Public Is Deceived." The Intercept (January 4, 2017)

Grieveson, Lee. "Discipline and Punish: The Birth of Cinematology." Cinema Journal 49.1 (Fall 2009): 168-176.

Gross-Loh, Christine. "A Better Way to Teach History." The Atlantic (February 8, 2016) ["One professor is borrowing a method from Harvard Business School to engage students and inspire better decision-making skills."]

Guriel, Jason. "Quieter Than 1984, but No Less Disquieting: Kingsley Amis’s 1976 alternate-history masterpiece The Alteration is an overlooked—but timely—novel about the dangers of authoritarianism." The Atlantic (March 5, 2017)

Hamilton, James T. "The Economics of Investigative Journalism." The Source (October 26, 2016)  ["In journalism, there are five W's: who, what, when, where and the most important - who is paying for this? How does the market transform muckraking information into a sustainable news product? What happens when editors and publishers don't see the economic value of the big scoop?"]

Hanlon, Aaron R. "Are Ph.D Students Irrational?" The Los Angeles Review of Books (August 24, 2016)

Hanora, Mallory and Matthew Segal. "Massachusetts to Throw Out 21,000 Drug Convictions After State Chemist Tampers with Evidence." Democracy Now (April 19, 2017)

Harp, Seth. "The Anarchists vs The Islamic State." Rolling Stone (February 14, 2017)

Hearts and Minds (USA: Peter Davis, 1974: 112 mins)

Hedges, Chris. "War is a Force That Gives Us Meaning." Approaches to Peace: A Reader in Peace Studies. 2nd edition. ed. David P. Barash. NY: Oxford UP, 2010: 24-26.

Hinderaker, Eric. "What Really Happened in the Boston Massacre." WBUR (March 21, 2017) ["Competing narratives put out in the immediate aftermath of an historic event. Various sides trying to be the first to win hearts and minds. That battle, of course, continues on today."]

Historical Thinking Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

Hooper, Niels. "Black Against Empire and Banned Books Week." University of California Press Blog (September 26, 2016)

Hughes, William. "CMAs erase Beyoncé and Dixie Chicks from its social media accounts." A.V. Club (November 4, 2016)

I Am Not Your Negro (France/USA: Raoul Peck, 2016: 95 mins)

"Introduction to the Podcast and Australia Cinema." The Last New Wave (July 30, 2016)

Isenberg, Nancy. "'White Trash' and Class in America." On the Media (June 22, 2016) ["As the media have watched the ascent of Donald Trump with disbelief-going-on-horror, pundits have returned frequently to the question of who exactly his supporters are. Terms like "angry" and "white working class" are mentioned frequently, but the National Review several months ago put it the most pointedly and viciously. In an article lambasting Trump supporters, Kevin Williamson characterized them as lazy drug addicts, compared them to animals, and even suggested that they deserved to die. Though he did not say it directly, the implication was clear: these people were white trash. We took that opportunity to take a deeper look at the idea of "white trash," with the help of writer and professor Nancy Isenberg, author of the forthcoming book, White Trash: The 400-Year Untold History of Class in America. Isenberg described to Brooke how the notion of "white trash" has been around for a long time, belying the idea that America is a "classless" society. White Trash comes out this week, and we're re-running our conversation in honor of it."]

Johnson, Grace Sanders. "Why Haiti Needs New Narratives: An Interview With Gina Athena Ulysse." AAIHS (November 6, 2016) ["On October 4, 2016, Hurricane Matthew roared through Haiti’s southwest peninsula taking with it homes, centuries-old structures, and over 800 lives. In the storm’s wake, media outlets observed the undeniable damage of this specific natural event by projecting recycled, dehumanizing, and ahistorical narratives of Haiti to the world. InWhy Haiti Needs New Narratives: A Post-Quake Chronicle, Haitian-born feminist anthropologist Gina Athena Ulysse writes: “if there is one thing we know for certain, it is that without destruction, sensationalism, and violence, there is no Haiti story.” Ulysse’s trilingual collection of essays is a balm to wounds that are reopened each time the black republic is (mis)represented. The book is a timely reminder of the need to critically interrogate the historical implications of this current moment."]

Johnson, Kij. "Spinning Lovecraft Into a Feminist Dream Quest." Geek's Guide to the Galaxy (August 19, 2016)

Joseph, Peniel. "The Radical Democracy of the Movement for Black Lives." AAIHS (September 18, 2016) [Black Lives Matter has cast a strobe-light on contemporary myths of racial progress, arguing correctly that the criminal justice system represents a gateway to a panoramic system of racial and class and gender and sexuality oppression.”]

Kayyali, Dia. "Getting Started with Digital Security: Tips and Resources for Activists." Witness (November 2016)

Kelley, Robin D.G. "Freedom Dreams: The Black Radical Imagination." WGBH Forum Network (Posted on Youtube: August 4, 2014)

---. "Keeping it (Sur)Real: Dreams of the Marvelous." Freedom Dreams: The Black Radical Imagination.  Beacon Press, 2003: 157-194.

Kilpatrick, Connor. "Everybody Hates Cornel West." Jacobin #23 (November 2016)

Kolk, Bessel Van Der. "How Trauma Lodges in the Body." On Being (March 9, 2017) ["Human memory is a sensory experience, says psychiatrist Bessel van der Kolk. Through his longtime research and innovation in trauma treatment, he shares what he’s learning about how bodywork like yoga or eye movement therapy can restore a sense of goodness and safety. What he’s learning speaks to a resilience we can all cultivate in the face of the overwhelming events — which, after all, make up the drama of culture, of news, and of life."]

Koresky, Michael and Jeff Reichert. "This Means War! Introduction." Reverse Shot (June 23, 2003)

Koski, Genevieve and Tasha Robinson. "Elections, Entertainment and Empathy." The Next Picture Show (November 15, 2015)

Kovalik, Dan. "America in Vietnam: The Enduring Myth of the Noble Cause." Counterpunch (September 14, 2016)

Kuhn, Thomas S. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions. 2nd ed. The University of Chicago Press, 1970.

Krzych, Scott. "Beyond bias: Stock imagery and paradigmatic politics in Citizens United documentaries." Jump Cut #57 (Fall 2016)

Lanza, Robert. "Biocentrism: Rethinking Time, Space, Consciousness, and the Illusion of Death." Ideas (October 4, 2016) ["Dr. Lanza provides a compelling argument for consciousness as the basis for the universe, rather than consciousness simply being its by-product."]

Lear, Norman. "Just Another Version of You: The Life, Art and Activism of Legendary TV Producer Norman Lear." Democracy Now (October 25, 2016) ["Ninety-four-year-old legendary TV producer and longtime political activist Norman Lear has led a remarkable life. He helped revolutionize sitcom television with a string of hit shows including "All in the Family," "Sanford and Son," "The Jeffersons," "Good Times" and "Maude." In 1999, President Clinton awarded him the National Medal of Arts, saying, "Norman Lear has held up a mirror to American society and changed the way we look at it." Norman Lear is also a longtime activist, earning him a place on Richard Nixon’s enemies list and the scorn of the Christian right. His life, art and social activism is the subject of the new "American Masters" documentary, "Norman Lear: Just Another Version of You," which premieres tonight on PBS. We spoke with Norman Lear in studio last week."]

Lee, Kevin B. "Oliver Stone on How to Make History: Why authenticity is an unexpected through-line in this divisive director’s career." Keyframe (September 15, 2016)

Le Guin, Ursula K. "Speech at National Book Awards: 'Books aren't just commodities'." The Guardian (November 20, 2014)

Liddington, Jill, et al. "Rebels in the Archive." The British Library (March 8, 2017) ["Rebels in the Archives took place at the British Library on International Women’s Day 2017. The event considered the power and potential of archiving stories of sexism, sisterhood and struggle, raising issues about how identity and privilege impact upon the personal and public stories that get archived, as well as who can access them. The panel discussed their own use of archives in relation these issues; archives which relate to the Suffragette movement were a particular topic of discussion. "]

"Logical Fallacies." Purdue Online Writing Lab (ND)

Lorber, Judith. "Believing as Seeing: Biology as Ideology." Gender and Society (December 1, 1993) ["Western ideology takes biology as the cause, and behavior and social statuses as the effects, and then proceeds to construct biological dichotomies to justify the “naturalness” of gendered behavior and gendered social statuses. What we believe is what we see—two sexes producing two genders. The process, however, goes the other way: gender constructs social bodies to be different and unequal. The content of the two sets of constructed social categories, “females and males” and “women and men,” is so varied that their use in research without further specification renders the results spurious."]

Mallet, Miguel Clark. "On Echo Chambers and Everyday Americans." On Being (February 21, 2017)

Mandelbaum, Randel F. "The 9 Best Reactions to the House Science Committee’s Breitbart Tweet." Scientific American (December 2, 2016)

Marvin, Carolyn and David W. Ingle. "Introduction." Blood Sacrifice and the Nation: Totem Rituals and the American Flag. Cambridge University Press, 1999: 1-10.

Mattson, Stephen. "Social Justice is a Christian Tradition - Not a Liberal Agenda." Sojourners (August 11, 2015)

May, Kate Torgovnick. "How Color Helps a Movie Tell a Story." TED (April 5, 2017)

"Media Consolidation: The Illusion of Choice (Infographic)." Frugal Dad (November 22, 2011)

Media History Digital Library  ["The Media History Digital Library is a non-profit initiative, led by David Pierce and Eric Hoyt, dedicated to digitizing historic books and magazines about film, broadcasting, and recorded sound for broad public access."]

Minto, Robert. "A Smuggling Operation: John Berger's Theory of Art." Los Angeles Review of Books (January 2, 2017)

Mock, Brentin. "There Are No Urban Design Courses on Race and Justice, So We Made Our Own Syllabus." City Lab (May 14, 2015) ["Black students at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design say there are no design courses that consider race and justice. Here’s an outline for one."]

Monbiot, George. "Frightened by Donald Trump? You don’t know the half of it." The Guardian (November 30, 2016)

---. "Neoliberalism is Creating Loneliness. That's What's Wrenching Society Apart." The Guardian (October 12, 2016) ["Epidemics of mental illness are crushing the minds and bodies of millions. It’s time to ask where we are heading and why.]

Moser, Friedrich. "A Good American." Film School (February 3, 2017) [" Friedrich Moser’s eye-opening A Good American soberly unfolds the deeply disturbing story of how corruption, lies and personal ambitions led to the closure of a cheap and effective monitoring system that demonstrably could have stopped the 9/11 terrorist attacks. "]

Murphy, Sue. "Gender Inequality In Film, Here's How It Really Looks." Her (2013)

Nicholas, James Michael. "New Film Takes A Hard Look At Masculinity And Homophobia In America." Huffington Post (September 22, 2016)

Occupy Movement Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

Olson, Dan. "Triumph of the Will and the Cinematic Language of Propaganda." Folding Ideas (Posted on Youtube: February 10, 2017)

O'Mara, Shane. Why Torture Doesn't Work: The Neuroscience of Interrogation. Harvard University Press, 2015.


Parijs, Philippe Van and Yannick Vanderborght. Basic Income: A Radical Proposal for a Free Society and a Sane Economy. Harvard University Press, 2017.

Parramore, Lynn. "Kanth: A 400 Year Program of Modernist Thinking is Exploding." Institute for New Economic Thinking (March 9, 2017)

Peper, Elliot. "What Does the Future of Democracy Look Like? An Incoming Transmission from Malka Older, author of Infomocracy." Scout (March 1, 2017)

Perlstein, Rick, et al. "Ghosts." On the Media (November 25, 2016) ["A special hour on memory, both historical and personal, and how what we remember shapes our world."]

Peabody, Fred. "All Governments Lie: Truth, Deception, and the Spirit of I.F. Stone." Film School (November 4, 2016) ["ALL GOVERNMENTS LIE: Truth, Deception, and the Spirit of I.F. Stone is a timely documentary for audiences who are increasingly seeking alternatives to news media owned by large corporations. News events and journalistic trailblazers stretching over many decades are linked together to tell this important story. This film will resonate with audiences in the US and worldwide, as news media ownership increasingly falls into the hands of a few giant corporations."]

Pinter, Harold. "Art, Truth and Politics." Nobel Prize in Literature 2005 (Acceptance Speech)

"Platform." The Movement for Black Lives (ND)

Popova, Maria. "Alain de Botton on How to Think About Sex More." Brain Pickings (February 14, 2013) [“The more closely we analyze what we consider ‘sexy,’ the more clearly we will understand that eroticism is the feeling of excitement we experience at finding another human being who shares our values and our sense of the meaning of existence.”]

---. "Philosopher Erich Fromm on the Art of Loving and What is Keeping Us From Mastering It." Brain Pickings (October 29, 2015)

Possingham, Hugh. "Science: On Earth Day, Hope for a Better Future." Cool Green Science (April 13, 2017)

Prasad, Sonali, et al. "Obama's Dirty Secret: The Fossil Fuel Projects the US Littered Around the World." The Guardian (December 1, 2016)

Price, David. "Cold War Anthropology: The C.I.A., the Pentagon, and the Growth of Dual Use Anthropology." Live! From City Lights (February 1, 2017)  ["In Cold War Anthropology, David H. Price offers a provocative account of the profound influence that the American security state has had on the field of anthropology since the Second World War. Using a wealth of information unearthed in CIA, FBI, and military records, he maps out the intricate connections between academia and the intelligence community and the strategic use of anthropological research to further the goals of the American military complex. The rise of area studies programs, funded both openly and covertly by government agencies, encouraged anthropologists to produce work that had intellectual value within the field while also shaping global counterinsurgency and development programs that furthered America’s Cold War objectives. Ultimately, the moral issues raised by these activities prompted the American Anthropological Association to establish its first ethics code. Price concludes by comparing Cold War-era anthropology to the anthropological expertise deployed by the military in the post-9/11 era."]

Project Censored [Website: "Project Censored educates students and the public about the importance of a truly free press for democratic self-government. We expose and oppose news censorship and we promote independent investigative journalism, media literacy, and critical thinking. An informed public is crucial to democracy in at least two basic ways. First, without access to relevant news and opinion, people cannot fully participate in government. Second, without media literacy, people cannot evaluate for themselves the quality or significance of the news they receive. Censorship undermines democracy. Project Censored’s work—including our annual book, weekly radio broadcasts, campus affiliates program, and additional community events—highlights the important links among a free press, media literacy and democratic self-government."]

Puschak, Evan. "Children of Men: Don't Ignore the Background." (Posted on Youtube: September 9, 2015) [MB: This was a powerful film that looked to the future to examine the global politics of 2006 when it was released (highlighted even more by the collection of philosophers/theorists that provided commentaries on the imagery/narrative in the original DVD edition), and, as Evan Puschak demonstrates in this video essay, its relevance has only increased over the next decade. This analysis includes references to our current social/political issues to demonstrate its continuing relevance.  Don't ignore the background (context) - could be applicable in our own attempts to understand the issues of the world.]

---. "Donald Trump: Magician-In-Chief." (Posted on Youtube: November 30, 2016)

Quinn, Susan. "Eleanor and Hick." Radio West (April 14, 2017)  ["the story of the unconventional relationship that deeply influenced Eleanor Roosevelt. When FDR entered the White House in 1932, Eleanor feared her independent life would take a back seat to the ceremonial role of first lady. But on the campaign trail she had met Lorena Hickok, a feisty reporter who would become her advisor, confidante, and lover. Biographer Susan Quinn joins Doug to explain how Eleanor and “Hick” used their bond to better depression-ravaged America."]

Race: The Power of an Illusion (3 part documentary series)

Ramirez-Berg, Charles. "Categorizing the Other: Stereotypes and Stereotyping." Latino Images in Film: Stereotypes, Subversion, Resistance. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2002. pgs. 13-37.

"Raoul Peck." WTF #789 (February 27, 2017) ["Filmmaker Raoul Peck spent more than a decade putting together the documentary I Am Not Your Negro, a powerful film illuminating the words and life of writer and social critic James Baldwin. But as Marc learns in this conversation, Raoul’s own backstory of living under dictatorships, studying across four continents, and learning how to engage activism through art is just as important in understanding how to respond to the world today."]

Reeves, Joshua. "Introduction: Seeing, Saying and Civic Responsibility." Citizens Spies: The Long Rise of American Surveillance Society. New York University Press, 2017: 1-20.

Reich, Elizabeth. "Why Afrofuturism Matters." Los Angeles Review of Books (April 14, 2017)

Richards, Jill. "Pussy Wars." Los Angeles Review of Books (March 24, 2017)

Richardson, Vanessa and Carter Roy. "Socrates." Remarkable Lives, Tragic Deaths #22 (December 13, 2016) ["Socrates was a Greek philosopher who is credited as one of the founders of Western Philosophy. He was born circa 470 BC in Athens, Greece. We know of his life through the writings of his students, including Plato and Xenophon. His "Socratic method," laid the groundwork for Western systems of logic and philosophy. Socrates was sentenced to death by hemlock poisoning in 399 BC."]

Richter, Brent. "Culture warrior - How anthropology can save the world." North Shore News (September 10, 2016) [Wade Davis: "“The great revelation of anthropology was that the world that you’re born into is just one model of reality, the consequence of one set of choices your cultural lineage made, however successfully,” Davis said. “The other peoples of the world remind us there are other ways of thinking, other ways of being, other ways of orienting yourself in social, physical, even spiritual space.”]

Rickford, Russell. "Managed Democracy And The Illusion Of Politics." AAIHS (October 23, 2016)

Robinson, Ken. "Changing Education Paradigms." RSA Animate (2010)

Róisín, Fariha. "Kids Like Us: Fifteen years after its release, Bend It Like Beckham is still an essential representation of South Asian teenagehood." Hazlitt (April 11, 2017)

Rosenberg, Marshall. "Nonviolent Communication." Against the Grain (December 6, 2016)

---. Speaking Peace: Connecting with Others Through Nonviolent Communication. (Audiobook posted Daily Motion: original publication March 20, 2015)

Rothman, Joshua. "How To Restore Your Faith in Democracy." The New Yorker (November 11, 2016) ["In dark times, it’s tempting to give up on politics. The philosopher Charles Taylor explains why we shouldn’t."]

Rusert, Brit. "Introduction." Fugitive Science: Empiricism and Freedom in Early African-American Culture. New York University Press, 2017: 1-22.

Sakai, J. Settlers: The Myth of the White Proletariat. 3rd ed. Morningstar Press, 1989.

Sarkeesian, Anita. "Damsel in Distress: Part 1 - Tropes vs Women in Video Games." Feminist Frequency (Posted on Youtube: March 7, 2013)

---. "Damsel in Distress: Part 2 - Tropes vs Women in Video Games." Feminist Frequency (Posted on Youtube: May 28, 2013)

---. "Damsel in Distress: Part 3 - Tropes vs Women in Video Games." Feminist Frequency (Posted on Youtube: August 1, 2013)

Schoenbrun, Dan. "All Movies are Political Movies. We Need to Do Better." Filmmaker (November 9, 2016)

Schweitzer, Ivy. "Friendship as Civic Democratic Practice." The Los Angeles Review of Books (April 15, 2017)

Scott, James C. Two Cheers for Anarchism: Six Easy Pieces on Autonomy, Dignity, and Meaningful Work and Play. Princeton University Press, 2012.

Secrets, Politics and Torture (PBS Documentary: May 19, 2015) ["From veteran FRONTLINE filmmaker Michael Kirk (United States of SecretsLosing IraqBush’s WarThe Torture Question) comes the dramatic story of the fight over the CIA’s controversial interrogation methods, widely criticized as torture. Based on recently declassified documents and interviews with key political leaders and CIA insiders, the film investigates what the CIA did — and whether it worked."]

Seybold, Matt. "The Berth of Biopolitics." The Los Angeles Review of Books (April 16, 2017)

Soldier, Layli Long. "The Freedom of Real Apologies." On Being (March 30, 2017) ["A single voice of integrity and searching can be a window into a whole world. Layli Long Soldier is a writer, a mother, a citizen of the U.S. and of the Oglala Lakota Nation. Her book of poetry, WHEREAS, is an innovative response to the congressional resolution of “Apology to Native Peoples,” which was tucked inside the 2010 Department of Defense Appropriations Act. She offers entry points for us all — to events that are not merely about the past, and to the freedom real apologies might bring."]
Spong, John Shelby. "Biblical Literalism." Radio West (September 2, 2016)  ["Retired Episcopal Bishop John Shelby Spong presents a provocative idea in his latest book. Reading the Bible literally, he says, is heresy. He bases his argument on a close reading of the Gospel of Matthew, which he argues was written by Jews for Jews. Spong says the gospel was not written as a literal account of Christ’s life, but rather as an interpretative portrait of God’s love. Spong joins us Friday to talk about biblical literalism and his uniquely progressive approach to Christianity. John Shelby Spong is the retired Episcopal Bishop of Newark. He has lectured at more than 500 universities, colleges, and theological seminaries around the world. He is the author 25 books, including his newest, Biblical Literalism: A Gentile Heresy.]

Stock, Kathleen. "On Fiction and the Emotions." Philosophy Bites (November 12, 2016)

The Stories We Tell: Quote File Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

Stravers, Jon, et al. "The Mississippi." To the Best of Our Knowledge (July 31, 2016)  ["The Mississippi River is an American icon. It's a body of water that’s been shaped as much by cultural processes as by environmental ones. From the state lines it draws to its role in literature and the arts, it’s a river that flows deep in the American psyche. This episode is about the boundaries and horizons of the Mississippi — its deep geologic past, its history as a route to freedom, and its meaning today. "]

Streeck, Wolfgang. "Surviving Post-Capitalism: Coping, hoping, doping & shopping." Ideas (February 9, 2017) ["The signs are troubling: the ever-widening chasm between the ultra-rich and everyone else. Mass protests. Political upheaval and social division. It looks as though the rocky marriage between capitalism and democracy is doomed, at least according to Wolfgang Streeck, who directs the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies in Cologne, Germany, where he is also a professor of sociology. In conversation with Paul Kennedy about his book How Will Capitalism End?, he makes the unnerving case that capitalism is now at a point where it cannot survive itself."]

Swanson, David. "The CIA Never Ever Lies." Counterpunch (December 12, 2016)

Taibbi, Matt. "The 'Washington Post' 'Blacklist' Story Is Shameful and Disgusting." Rolling Stone (November 29, 2016)

Tarkovsky, Andrei. Sculpting in Time: The Great Russian Filmmaker Discusses His Art. (Originally published in 1986)

Teaching Black Lives Matter SFUSD (Ongoing Archive)

"Teaching The New Jim Crow." Teaching Tolerance (ND)

"Telling a Life." To the Best of Our Knowledge (October 23, 2016)  ["How do you tell the story of your life? Do you focus on meaning, accomplishment and hope - or on failure and loss? Psychologists say telling a good life story can make you happier. But do we also create an inauthentic version of ourselves if we turn everything into a narrative? We explore the idea of life stories, and hear why poet and singer Patti Smith chose to "write about nothing" when writing about her own life."]

Thill, Vanessa. "Bad Blood, Honest Work: Blood on the Mountain." Brooklyn Rail (April 1, 2017)

Thompsett, Fern. "Free Universities." Against the Grain (January 30, 2017)  ["As universities become increasingly infiltrated and transformed by capitalist logics, what do free universities add to the educational, social, and political landscape? Fern Thompsett, a Ph.D. student at McGill University, co-founded a free university in Australia; she’s also researched more than two dozen free university projects in North America. Thompsett describes both the free-of-charge and radical-emancipatory aspects of free universities."]

Thompson, Kelly. "Breaking the Binaries: A Conversation with Lidia Yuknavitch." The Rumpus (April 24, 2017)

Toobin, Jeffrey. "American Heiress." Radio West (September 8, 2016) ["Jeffrey Toobin, who’s written a book about the 1974 kidnapping of Patty Hearst. Hearst was 19 and heir to her family’s fortune when the “Symbionese Liberation Army” took her, and it soon seemed that she had adopted their incoherent, revolutionary cause. We’ll explore the controversy over Hearst’s involvement in their crimes, the atmosphere that gave birth to the SLA, and why Toobin says the story sheds light on a time when America was on the brink of a nervous breakdown."]

"The Top 25 Censored News Stories of 2015 - 2016." Project Censored (2016) [Earlier annual archives of Top 25 Censored News Stories listed here.]

Tragos, Tracy Droz. "Abortion: Stories Women Tell." Film School (August 11, 2016)  ["In 1973 the U.S. Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade recognized the right of every woman in the United States to have an abortion. Since 2011, over half the states in the nation have significantly restricted access to abortions. In 2016, abortion remains one of the most divisive issues in America, especially in Missouri, where only one abortion clinic remains open, patients and their doctors must navigate a 72-hour waiting period, and each year sees more restrictions. Awarding-winning director and Missouri native Tracy Droz Tragos sheds new light on the contentious issue with a focus not on the debate, but rather on the women themselves – those struggling with unplanned pregnancies, the providers who show up at clinics to give medical care, as well as the activists on both sides of the issue hoping to sway decisions and lives. Tragos’ illuminating documentary Abortion: Stories Women Tell offers an intimate window into the lives of these women through their personal stories. Some are heartbreaking and tender some are bleak and frightening; some women, on both sides of the issue, find the choice easy to make due to their own circumstances and beliefs, while others simply inform us of the strength and capacity of women to overcome and persevere through complicated and unexpected circumstances. Director and producer Tracy Droz Tragos joins us for a conversation on one of the most contentious and intractable issues facing women and her beautifully balanced, heart wrenching and moving documentary."]

"Umberto Eco Makes a List of the 14 Common Features of Fascism." Open Culture (November 22, 2016)

Ware, Syrus Marcus. "All That We Touch, We Change." Canadian Art (April 10, 2017) ["In the 1990s, Octavia E. Butler wrote an unfinished sci-fi trilogy that appears to predict many aspects of the world in which we now live. But Butler’s books aren’t just uncanny prophecy—within them lie potential tools of resistance and survival."]

Whitney, Mike. "The Corporate Media’s Assault on Free Speech: an Interview with Jeffrey St. Clair." Counterpunch (December 13, 2016)

Williams, Roger Ross. "Life, Animated." The Treatment (July 6, 2016) ["Roger Ross Williams has made a career of giving a voice to the voiceless. In his documentary Life, Animated, an adaptation of Ron Suskind’s book of the same name, he highlights Owen, an autistic child who identifies with and ultimately finds his own voice through animated Disney movies. Today, Roger discusses his long time struggle for representing the underdogs as well as what he learned, not only about raising a child with autism, but about the world of Disney."]

Willis, Paul. "“She Knew Then That She was Going to Die of Her Femininity”: The Making of the Ayahuasca Drama Icaros: A Vision." Filmmaker (April 19, 2017)

Yancy, George. "I Am a Dangerous Professor." The New York Times (November 30, 2016)

---. "Whiteness as Ambush and the Transformative Power of Vigilance." Black Bodies, White Gazes: The Continuing Significance of Race. Rowan and Littlefield, 2008: 227-247.

The Yes Men Fix the World (France/UK/USA: Andy Bichlbaum, Mike Bonanno and Kurt Engfehr, 2009: 87 mins)

Yates, Michael. "Vietnam: The War That Won't Go Away." Counterpunch (December 5, 2016)

Young, Alden, "Braveheart for Black People: A Review of Birth of a Nation." AAIHS (October 25, 2016)

Young, Iris Marion. On Female Body Experience: Throwing Like a Girl and Other Essays. Oxford University Press, 2005.

"The Zazous (1940-1945)." Libcom (October 1, 2006) ["An account of the French anti-Nazi cultural youth movement who opposed the Vichy regime in occupied France. Influenced by jazz and swing they met in basement clubs and scuffled with fascists on the streets."]

Zero Dark Thirty (USA: Kathryn Bigelow, 2012: 157 mins)

Zimring, Franklin M. When Police Kill. Harvard University Press, 2017.

Zinn, Howard. Audio version of Zinn reading his Introduction to A People's History of the United States: Highlights from the Twentieth Century  (Posted on Soundcloud: 2015) ["Since its original landmark publication in 1980, Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States has been chronicling American history from the bottom up, throwing out the official version of history taught in schools–with its emphasis on great men in high places–to focus on the street, the home, and the workplace."]

---. A People's History of the United States, 1492 - the Present. Harper-Perennial, 2015.