Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Resources for August 30, 2017

Alda, Rutanya, et al. "Mommie Dearest (1981)." The Projection Booth #322 (May 10, 2017) ["Based on the scandalous memoir by Christina Crawford, Frank Perry's Mommie Dearest (1981) gave the world a powerhouse performance by Faye Dunaway as Joan Crawford. On this episode of The Projection Booth, Joshua Grannell and Terry Frost join Mike to discuss the movie and its reception. Guests this episode include actress Rutanya Alda who gives a behind-the-scenes account of the shooting of the film and Justin Bozung who is currently writing a book about director Frank Perry."]

Belasco, Amy. "The Cost of Iraq, Afghanistan, and Other Global War on Terror Operations Since 9/11." Congressional Research Service (December 8, 2014)





Buckler, Dana. "Alien 3 (1992)." How Is This Movie? (May 9, 2017)

Dittmer, Linda. "Performing Gender in Boys Don't Cry."  Sugar and Spice and Everything Nice: Cinemas of Girlhood. ed. Frances K. Gateward and Murray Pomerance. Wayne State University Press, 2002: 145-162.

Flores, Steven. "The Auteurs: Jane Campion." Cinema Axis (September 30, 2013)

Goro, El. "The Day After (1983) and Threads (1984)." Talk Without Rhythm #383 (August 27, 2017)

Halley, Catherine. "Charlottesville Syllabus: Readings on Hate in America." JSTOR (August 16, 2017)

Hancock, James and Lisa Tribble Russell. "This is My Happening and It Freaks Me Out." Wrong Reel #266 (May 2017) ["Lisi Tribble Russell returns to discuss the wild, provocative films of the late Sixties and early Seventies specifically ‘Carnal Knowledge’ (1971) and ‘Beyond the Valley of the Dolls’ (1970)."]

Taylor, Ella. "Annette Bening is Just the Best: Who else brings us such a great range of joy, wry intelligence, and grownup allure?" Fandor (December 22, 2016)






Tuesday, August 29, 2017

Resources for August 29, 2017



Beyl, Cameron. "The Directors Series: David Fincher, Pts 1-5." (Posted on Film Stage: September 22, 2015)

Bhala, Kara Tan, Raj Bhala and Arun Venugopal. "Whose Kansas Is It Anyway?" The United States of Anxiety (May 9, 2017)  ["The city of Olathe, Kansas, has been shaken since February, when a man gunned down two Indian immigrants in a bar there. Witnesses say the shooter yelled, “Go back to your country!” It was the first hate-crime killing after the 2016 presidential election. WNYC’s Arun Venugopal traveled to Kansas to speak with members of the Indian community about how they’re dealing with the deaths, and with their changing status in America. Indian Americans enjoy the highest household income of any ethnic group in America. Their socioeconomic success and status as a ‘model minority’ has increasingly been reflected in American popular culture, as well as Bollywood films, and has played into arguments that America is a meritocracy, rather than one defined by white supremacy. But increasingly, members of the community argue that their wealth will not insulate them from racial bigotry."]

Detroit (USA: Kathryn Bigelow, 2017) Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive) 

Fitch, Alex, Neil Fox and Dario Linares. "Taxi Driver." The Cinematologists #45 (May 9, 2017) ["Martin Scorsese's Taxi Driver, scripted by Paul Schrader, has become a touchstone depiction of the alienated American experience post-Vietnam centered around a scintillating performance by Robert De Niro. Dario is joined by guest presenter Alex Fitch as they discuss the film's legacy, Scorsese as a director and all the other elements that give the film its classic status. And Neil and Dario expand on may of the key themes that permeate the work of arguably the greatest living American filmmaker."]

Freedman, Carl. "Russia 1917: You are There." The Los Angeles Review of Books (July 8, 2017)

Margolis, Harriet. "Introduction - 'A Strange Heritage': From Colonization to Transformation." Jane Campion's Piano. Cambridge University Press, 2000: 1-20.

Parras, Bryan. "As Catastrophic Flooding Hits Houston, Fears Grow of Pollution from Oil Refineries & Superfund Sites." Democracy Now (August 28, 2017)




Segade, Alexandro. "We Belong: On Sense 8." Art Forum (August 24, 2017)

Zero Dark Thirty (USA: Kathryn Bigelow, 2012) Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)








Detroit (USA: Kathryn Bigelow, 2017)




Detroit (USA: Kathryn Bigelow, 2017: 143 mins)

Brody, Richard. "The Immoral Artistry of Kathryn Bigelow's Detroit." The New Yorker (August 4, 2017)

Dargis, Manohla and A.O. Scott. "One Nation Under a Movie Theater? It's a Myth." The New York Times (September 7, 2017)  ["Hollywood wants us to think that its films are for everyone, but our critics say that was never true. Still, they see a way forward."]

Detroit Critics Round Up (Ongoing Archive)

Elgion, John. "A White Director, the Police, and Race in Detroit." The New York Times (August 2, 2017)

Flores, Steven. "The Auteurs: Kathryn Bigelow." Cinema Axis (January 22, 2014)

Hamm, Larry and Scott Kurashige. "The Rebellions That Changed U.S. History: Looking Back at the 1967 Newark & Detroit Uprisings." Democracy Now (July 25, 2017) ["Fifty years ago this month, rebellions broke out in the cities of Newark and Detroit. It all began in Newark on July 12, 1967, when two white police officers detained and beat an African-American cabdriver. Shortly after, on July 23, police officers raided an after-hours club in an African-American neighborhood of Detroit, sparking another mass rebellion. Forty-three people died in Detroit, and 26 were killed in Newark, while 7,000 people were arrested. The rebellions reshaped both Newark and Detroit and marked the beginning of an era of African-American political empowerment."]

Harris, Aisha. "What's Fact and What's Fiction in Detroit." Slate (August 3, 2017)

Hudson, David. "The Daily: Kathryn Bigelow's Detroit." The Current (July 23, 2017)

Jackson, Danielle. "More Than a Riot Going On: A Detroit Inspired Reading List." Longreads (August 14, 2017)

Koski, Genevieve, et al. "Detroit / Battle of Algiers, Part 1." The Next Picture Show #90 (August 22, 2017) ["Kathryn Bigelow’s intense, controversial new docu-drama DETROIT owes no small debt to Gillo Pontecorvo’s intense, controversial 1966 film THE BATTLE OF ALGIERS, which covers another volatile historical moment with a potent mixture of newsreel-style realism and expressionistic fervor. In this half of our comparison of the two films, we discuss what makes BATTLE OF ALGIERS such an unsettling and resonant film, debate what point it’s making around the issues of terrorism and torture, and, somehow, find the echoes of Pontecorvo’s film in James Cameron’s AVATAR."]

---. "Detroit / The Battle of Algiers, Part 2." The Next Picture Show #91 (August 24, 2017) ["Like Gillo Pontecorvo’s BATTLE OF ALGIERS, Kathryn Bigalow’s new film DETROIT expresses a strong point of view on racial injustice through a careful recreation of a real historical event — and also like BATTLE OF ALGIERS, it’s stirred up some controversy surrounding its docu-journalistic approach. We unpack that controversy, and DETROIT more generally, before diving into how the two films compare in their visceral style, their portrayals of law enforcement, their use of female characters, and more."]

Leigh, Danny. "Kathryn Bigelow on Detroit: ‘There’s a radical desire not to face the reality of race.'" The Guardian (August 17, 2017)

Nazaryan, Alexander. "Kathryn Bigelow's Detroit is a Well-Intentioned Misfire." Newsweek (July 26, 2017)

Orr, Christopher. "The Disappointments of Detroit." The Atlantic (August 4, 2017)

Zacharek, Stephanie. "Detroit is an Important but Flawed Look at American History." Time (July 28, 2017)























Sunday, August 27, 2017

Resources for August 27, 2017

"Calm and Collected #10." Lexington Community Radio (August 15, 2017)

Fang, Lee and Leighton Akio Woodhouse. "Video: How White Nationalism Became Normalized Online." The Intercept (August 25, 2017)

Fisher, Mark. "Remember Who the Enemy Is." K-Punk (November 25, 2013) [On The Hunger Games]

Hassler-Forest, Dan. "Politicizing Star Wars: Anti-Fascism vs. Nostalgia in Rogue One." The Los Angeles Review of Books (December 26, 2016)

---. "The Politics of the Planet of the Apes." The Los Angeles Review of Books (August 26, 2017)

Morabito, Stella. "The Strange Bedfellow-Politics of The Hunger Games." The Federalist (December 15, 2014) ["How can both the Left and the Right claim ‘The Hunger Games’ movies as their own?']

Recommended Films of 2016





Saperstein, Pat. "Tobe Hooper, Texas Chain Saw Massacre and Poltergeist Director, Dies at 74." Variety (August 27, 2017)

Sims, J. Marion. "Why Black Women Are Protesting A Statue Of This Famed Gynecologist." The Huffington Post (August 21, 2017)




Saturday, August 26, 2017

Resources for August 26, 2017

"A Charlottesville Syllabus for Our Uncertain Times." Beacon Broadside (August 18, 2017) ["The events in Charlottesville, Virginia are a frightening and disheartening reminder of how hate and intolerance in the US resurface when bigots feel empowered to act on their prejudice. Cornel West described the rally that took place on August 12 as “the biggest gathering of a hate-driven right wing in the history of this country in the last thirty to thirty-five years.” Watching the violence unfold left us feeling sorrowful and horrified. We at Beacon Press believe in promoting anti-racism, religious pluralism, and respect for diversity in all areas of life. We work to lift up the voices that speak to urgent social issues. In today’s politically fraught climate, we find ourselves face-to-face with these issues, which is why Rev. Dr. William J. Barber, II has rightfully declared that, “now is the time for a Third Reconstruction. We who believe in freedom insist that we are going forward together, not one step back.” The level of hate seen at the rallies in Charlottesville has a history and a context that need to be understood. As president of the Unitarian Universalist Association Rev. Susan Frederick-Gray said at the peaceful counter-protests in Charlottesville, “White supremacy is not new in this country, but its renewed boldness is.” To that end, discussions about it need to continue in order for us to work toward inclusiveness and social justice. That’s why we’ve put together a list of resources for your perusal. This list includes resources from the Anti-Defamation League, Teaching Tolerance, Political Research Associates, Facing History, and our own authors and staff; it’s by no means exhaustive. We’ll keep adding to it to empower a reimagining of justice and the societal transformation necessary to dismantle white supremacy and structural violence. We hope you find these helpful in our uncertain times."]

Collier, Stuart and Tom Sutpen. "The Unedited Commentary Track: The Beguiled (Don Siegel; 1971)." Illusion Travels by Streetcar #139 (April 30, 2017)




Delaney, Erin. "Women Unbound: Queer Utopia in the Wachowski Sisters’ Bound." cléo 4.2 (December 2016)

Film Static (New Lexington Community Radio show hosted by Paul Hogue and Lucy Jones - the Facebook page)

Hart, David and Dwight Hurst. "Serenity and Choice." Pop Culture Case Study #231 (May 4, 2017)

Heath, Roderick. "Queen Margot (La reine Margot, 1994)." This Island Rod (March 16, 2010)

Luhrmann, T.M. "To Dream in Different Cultures." The New York Times (May 13, 2014)

Reichert, Jeff. "From the Other Side: Degrees of Separation." Reverse Shot (May 30, 2017)







ENG 281: Women Filmmakers (Spring 2017) - Student Responses




Marc Blunk 10 (The Punk Singer; Point Break; Chocolat; The Piano; Boys Don't Cry; The Matrix; Blade Runner; American Mary; Selma; The Beguiled 1971)

Jonathan Feinberg 10 (Chocolat; Point Break; The Piano; Boys Don't Cry; Sense8; American Mary; Selma; Donnie Darko; Fish Tank; The Beguiled 1971)

Chelsey Smith 7 (Chocolat; Trinity; Boys Don't Cry; Blade Runner; American Mary; Selma; Wonder Woman)

Dax Carmickle 10 (Punk Singer; Point Break; The Piano; Boys Don't Cry; Sense8; Blade Runner; Selma; The Beguiled 2017; Wonder Woman; American Psycho)

Brittany Morgan 15 (Chocolat; Piano; Trinity; Blade Runner; 2036: Nexus Dawn; American Mary; Donnie Darko; Blade Runner 2049; Fish Tank; The Edge of Seventeen; The Beguiled 1971; The Beguiled 2017; 3 Generations; Tiny Furniture; Life Partners)


sifting

Angel Crutcher 10 (The Punk Singer; Chocolat; Point Break; Trinity; Selma)

Christopher Coleman 2 (Atomic Blonde; The Beguiled 1971)

Rachel Kelley  10 (The Punk Singer; Chocolat; Point Break; The Piano; The Beguiled 1971 & 2017; American Mary)

Phillip Corum 0

Paul Kelley 10 (Boys Don't Cry; Sense8; Donnie Darko; Fish Tank; The Beguiled 1971 & 2017)












Michael Benton


Exemplary class responses:

Brittany Morgan - Feminism: The Beguiled (2017)

Dax Carmickle: The Beguiled (2017)

Jonathan Feinberg: The Beguiled (1971)

Brittany Morgan: Blade Runner 2049

Jonathan Feinberg: Fish Tank

Jonathan Feinberg: Donnie Darko

Angel Crutcher: Selma

Dax Carmickle: Selma

Jonathan Feinberg: Sense8

Jonathan Feinberg: Boys Don't Cry

Marc Blunk: Blade Runner

Marc Blunk: The Piano

Rachel Kelley: The Piano

Marc Blunk - Chocolat: le cordon blue."

Jonathan Feinberg: Chocolat










Friday, August 25, 2017

Resources for August 25, 2017




Buckler, Dana. "Alien (1979)." How Is This Movie? (May 2, 2017)

Chu, Jaime. "What's Not To Touch: Jane Campion's Intimacies."  cléo 5.1 (2017)

Harris, Lauren Carroll. "Woman with an Editing Bench: How do film editors think?" Real Time (August 23, 2017)

Koski, Genevieve, et al. "Detroit / Battle of Algiers, Part 1." The Next Picture Show #90 (August 22, 2017) ["Kathryn Bigelow’s intense, controversial new docu-drama DETROIT owes no small debt to Gillo Pontecorvo’s intense, controversial 1966 film THE BATTLE OF ALGIERS, which covers another volatile historical moment with a potent mixture of newsreel-style realism and expressionistic fervor. In this half of our comparison of the two films, we discuss what makes BATTLE OF ALGIERS such an unsettling and resonant film, debate what point it’s making around the issues of terrorism and torture, and, somehow, find the echoes of Pontecorvo’s film in James Cameron’s AVATAR."]

---. "Detroit / The Battle of Algiers, Part 2." The Next Picture Show #91 (August 24, 2017) ["Like Gillo Pontecorvo’s BATTLE OF ALGIERS, Kathryn Bigalow’s new film DETROIT expresses a strong point of view on racial injustice through a careful recreation of a real historical event — and also like BATTLE OF ALGIERS, it’s stirred up some controversy surrounding its docu-journalistic approach. We unpack that controversy, and DETROIT more generally, before diving into how the two films compare in their visceral style, their portrayals of law enforcement, their use of female characters, and more."]

---. "Stop Making Sense / Justin Timberlake, Part 1." The Next Picture Show #76 (May 16, 2017) ["We’re still mourning the recent death of Jonathan Demme, a director of incredible range capable of working across many different genres — most notably, for our purposes, the concert film. This week, we hold our lighters aloft for Demme by looking at his first and last concert films, 1984’s STOP MAKING SENSE and 2016’s JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE + THE TENNESSEE KIDS. In this half, we consider the first film’s enduring legacy and influence on the concert-film genre, and how the film functions as a symbiosis of the unique talents of both Demme and Talking Heads frontman David Byrne."]

---. "Stop Making Sense / Justin Timberlake, Part 2." The Next Picture Show #77 (May 18, 2017) ["In this half of our appreciation of the late, great director Jonathan Demme, we bring what would be his final film, JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE + THE TENNESSEE KIDS, into the mix, to see what connects it to the director’s first foray into the concert-film genre, STOP MAKING SENSE. The two films focus on very different musical acts, but they’re undeniably connected via “the Demme touch,” and function as appropriate bookends to an impressive filmmaking career (which we can’t help but explore a little more broadly in this discussion as well)."]

Mercer, Benjamin. "Good Time: Huffing and Puffing." Reverse Shot (August 11, 2017)

Seitz, Matt Zoller. "Carlito's Way." Reverse Shot (November 26, 2006)

Shorts cléo 5.2 (2017) [“If you think of something, do it.” Lydia Davis, the sovereign of all things brief, has a good point. At cléo we thought of something, which turned into: the SHORTS issue! We were to curious to explore this theme because short films never seem to get enough love–despite the fact that the form is a fertile ground for new discoveries when it comes to emerging voices. Plus, for the cinematic completists out there, short films can also shed light on the key inspirations and ideas of a favourite director."]



Friday, August 18, 2017

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Pariah (USA: Dee Rees, 2011)




Pariah (USA: Dee Rees, 2011: 86 mins)

Archer, Ina Diane. "Pariah." Film Comment (November/December 2011)

Barber-Plentie, Grace. "Why Dee Rees Pariah is More than the Female Moonlight." BFI (June 13, 2017)

Bugbee, Teo, et al. "The Cinema of Experience." Film Comment Podcast (October 10, 2017) ["In this special live episode of the podcast, moderated by Film Comment Editor-in-Chief Nicolas Rapold, panelists Teo Bugbee (The New York Times contributor), writer-programmer Ashley Clark (BAMcinématek), and writer-filmmaker Farihah Zaman (Field of Vision) discuss how cinematic technique is used to reflect nonwhite perspectives and stories of immigration, and what is different about the latest generation of storytelling."]

"Dee Rees delivers moving, powerful acceptance speech for the 2017 Sundance Institute Vanguard Award." Shadow and Act (August 15, 2017)

Dolan, Jill. "Pariah." The Feminist Spectator (February 3, 2012)

Ebert, Roger. "Pariah." Chicago Sun-Times (January 4, 2012)

Holden, Stephen. "A Brooklyn Girl Who's Just Not Frilly." The New York Times (December 27, 2011)

Leonard, David. "Refusing Invisibility: Pariah Challenges Social and Religious Norms." Urban Cusp (January 9, 2012)

Mumin, Nilja. "The Visual Aesthetic of Pariah – An Interview w/ Cinematographer Bradford Young." IndieWire (August 17, 2015)

"Pariah." Cinemacked (August 22, 2015)

Serwer, Adam. "Pariah and the Untold Stories in Black Cinema." Mother Jones (December 28, 2011)

Taylor, Ella. "A Good Daughter, but a Pariah Among Her Own." NPR (December 29, 2011)

Thomas, Dori. "The Defiance and Optimism of Dee Ree's Pariah." Words on Film (October 13, 2014)

Young, Bradford. "The Philosophy of Cinematography." The Film Stage (November 5, 2015) [Cinematographer for the films Selma (2014); A Most Violent Year (2014); Ain't Them Bodies Saints (2013); Middle of Nowhere (2012); Pariah (2011)]























Friday, August 11, 2017

Slurring Bee 4

Also need 15 absurd/quirky warm up questions

1st Round: warm-up question followed by a word
2nd Round: 3 words in succession for each contestant
3rd Round: Round-robin until we have a winner (keep track of last three - the order they come in)
3 mispelled words and a contestant is out

Pronouncer Information 1. Read carefully the Judges, Recorders, Spellers and Audiences information that is included in the Scripps pronouncers’ guide. 2. Familiarize yourself with all words on the confidential word list. Pronunciation is important. A meeting with the judges to insure pronunciation of words and procedures will be scheduled prior to the Bee beginning. 3. Speak clearly for contestants, judges and audience alike. Grant all requests to repeat a word until the judges agree that the word has been made reasonably clear to the speller. You may request the speller to speak more clearly or louder. 4. “Pace” yourself. You need time to focus attention on the pronunciation of the new word and the judges need a few moments between each contestant to do their tasks.



Speller’s Information 1. Each speller needs to focus on the Pronouncer, to aid his or her hearing and understanding of the context of the word. A speller may ask for the word to be repeated, for its use in a sentence, for a definition, for the part of speech, and for the language of origin. 2. Each speller should pronounce the word before and after spelling it. If the speller fails to pronounce the word after spelling it, the judge may ask if they are finished. If they say yes, the judge will remind the speller to remember to repeat the word the next time. (No speller will be eliminated for failing to pronounce a word.) 3. When a speller is at the podium spelling, the next speller should be standing at a marked location ready to proceed to the podium.



128) grommet

129) abysmal

130) munificent

131) scurrilous

132) animus

133) luscious

134) epicurean

135) duende

136) epigenetics

137) microbiome

138) perspicuous

139) bilious

140) lachrymal

141) kakistocracy

142) calumny

143) poltroon

144) dithyramb

145) indigenous

146) genuflect

147) onerous

148) mumpsimus

149) celluloid

150) copacetic

151) luscious

152) edacious


















Saturday, August 5, 2017

Short Films and Videos (Ongoing Archive)




4:44 by Jay Z (TNEG, 2017: 8 mins and 11 secs)

A Juice Box Afternoon (USA: Lily Baldwin, 2014: 8 mins)

Alright by Kendrick Lamar (USA: Colin Tilley, 2015: 6 mins and 54 secs)

Animals by Ghost of a Sabre Tooth Tiger (USA: Rich Ragsdale, 2014: 5 mins)

Beautiful Dreamer (USA: David Gaddie, 2016: 26 mins and 11 secs)

Beat the Devil  (USA: Tony Scott, 2002: 9 mins)

Belhaven Meridian by Shabazz Palaces (Khalil Joseph, 2010: 3 mins and 25 secs)

Black America Again (USA: Bradford Young, 2016: 21 mins)

Black Up (Khalil Joseph, 2011: 4 mins and 49 secs)

The Crimson Permanent Assurance (UK: Terry Gilliam, 1983: 16 mins)

Fang, Lee and Leighton Akio Woodhouse. "Video: How White Nationalism Became Normalized Online." The Intercept (August 25, 2017)

Formation by Beyonce (USA: Melina Matsoukas, 2016: 3 mins and 26 secs)

House of Cards by Radiohead (Directed by James Frost, 2007: 4 mins and 32 seconds) ["These ephemeral bursts emanate from the 2008 music video for Radiohead’s “House of Cards” by director James Frost and technology director Aaron Koblin. The ethereal video holds a special place in music video history as the first to be created using high-tech scanning and laser systems to capture and then visualize chunks of 3-D information. Scanners, including the Lidar scanner used by Frost and Koblin, work by sending light pulses across a surface area and then measuring the time it takes for the light to return to the scanner. Each pulse of light that is emitted and then returned is placed within a representation known as a point cloud. Together, the points create a trace of the surface that they have measured. Frost and Koblin worked with scientists and technology experts from UCLA to make the video, inaugurating, whether they intended to or not, a shift in cinematic practice. The video’s point-cloud aesthetic eschews human perception and photographic representation as its foundation, turning instead to processes of scanning, tracing, and layering that relinquish the human body as their measure, and that forgo light as their foundation." - source Holly Willis (August 13, 2017)]

In God We Trust (USA: Jason Reitman, 2000: 16 mins)

"Jared Leto Stars in a New Prequel to Blade Runner 2049: Watch It Free Online." Open Culture (August 31, 2017)

Just by Radiohead (Directed by Jamie Thraves, 1995: 4 mins and 15 seconds)

Knights of Cydonia by Muse (Directed by Joseph Kohn, 2006: 6 mins and 5 seconds)

La jetée (France: Chris Marker, 1962: 28 mins)

The Less I Know the Better by Tame Impala (Canada collective, 2015)

Madea (USA: Ben Caldwell, 1973: 6 mins and 49 seconds)

Meshes of the Afternoon (USA: Maya Deren and Alexander Hammid, 1943: 14 mins)

Umshini Wam by Die Antwoord (Harmony Korine, 2011: 15 mins)

Un Chien Andalou (France: Luis Buñuel, 1929: 16 mins)

The Suburbs (USA: Spike Jonze, 2010: 5 mins and 47 secs)

Until the Quiet Comes by Flying Lotus (Kahlil Joseph, 2013: 4 mins)