Saturday, May 31, 2014

Embodied Cinema (Archive)

Branco, Patrícia Silveirinha Castello. "Editorial: Cinema, The Body, and Embodiment." CINEMA: Journal of Philosophy and the Moving Image #3 (2012)

"The Importance of Depth of Frame." imgur (September 2013)

Koutsourakis, Angelos. "Cinema of the Body: The Politics of Performativity in Lars von Triers Dogville and Yorgos Lanthimos's Dogtooth." CINEMA: Journal of Philosophy and the Movies #3 (2012)

Sobchack, Vivian. "Fleshing out the image: Phenomenology, Pedagogy, and Derek Jarman's Blue." CINEMA: Journal of Philosophy and the Moving Image #3 (2012)

---. "What My Fingers Knew: The Cinesthetic Subject, or Vision in the Flesh." Senses of Cinema (April 2000)


Philip Wohlstetter on Zero Dark Thirty: "How does a film think? Recall the famous experiment of Lev Kuleshov. Start with the shot of an actor’s face. Vary the shots adjacent to it: a coffin, a plate of soup, a seductive woman lying on a divan. The actor’s expression will be read, alternately, as sadness, hunger, or lust. For the audience, juxtaposition creates meaning. A film is an arrangement of moments, shorter or longer, but every narrative moment is brought into relief by a significant before-moment and a significant after-moment that frames it. Let’s look at the first torture sequence in Zero Dark Thirty to see how this meaning-effect works. Significant before-moment: the powerful opening sequence, dark screen, the terrified voice of a woman trapped in the World Trade Center on 9/11, realizing there’s no help coming, she’s going to die. Central narrative moment: a detainee is water-boarded in the next scene, forced to crawl in a dog collar, hung up naked by the arms, etc. After-moment: the face of Maya, wincing as she watches the torture. I’m cheating on this last. Obviously it’s a reaction shot within a scene, but in terms of meaning, it provides a bookend to the torture moment just as surely as the 9/11 sequence bookends it from the other side. To see the truth of this, imagine an opening with the before and after moments removed. We would be watching a brutal torture scene with no comment whatsoever—that is to say, we’d be in a neo-realist film that lets us observe and come to our own conclusions, that avoids (ideally) telling us what to feel. Instead, the torture moment is framed as a reaction to 9/11, an over-reaction maybe but understandable in context and perhaps in the end—we have to entertain this possibility—excusable. Now let’s look at the work of Maya’s reaction shot (remembering that it’s precisely the reaction shot, a way to locate the audience member in the movie by offering him/her a surrogate who reacts to events the way we would given the chance—it’s precisely this key device of classic Hollywood Film that Neo-Realism rejected because it lulled us so easily into unthinking). Maya winces. We would too, humanists and democrats that we are. But she stays in the room, gritting her teeth, going against her nature. Sometimes, the film whispers, you have to make hard choices, to take hard measures—a celluloid lesson in ‘dirty hands’ moral philosophy."

"If you could only see what I've seen with your eyes" - Roy Batty (Bladerunner, 1982)
Thomas Elsaesser: "As far as Hollywood is concerned, it wants audiences to interact with images, while Hollywood itself acts with the images. Which is to say, for the industry that makes them, images are instructions for actions — they trigger further moves, purchases and events — rather than pictures to contemplate or immerse yourself in, however much “immersion” might be the stated objective. In this respect, Avatar the film functions itself as an “avatar” in the larger system, of which it is the most successful representative. Hence my argument that when Hollywood films allegorize their own conditions of possibility, which are by necessity contradictory, they perform cognitive switches or enact a reversibility of roles: a master–slave relationship that never stabilizes itself."


TERMS/CONCEPTS:

Cinema of the Body (Deleuze)

Cronic Focal Disorder (from the 2014 novel Orfeo by Richard Powers)

Paratactic Style

Resources for May 31, 2014

"If you could only see what I've seen with your eyes" - Roy Batty (Bladerunner, 1982)




Dialogic Cinephilia archives:

Top Films of 1966

Top Films of 2010

Top Films of 2013


Philip Wohlstetter on Zero Dark Thirty: "How does a film think? Recall the famous experiment of Lev Kuleshov. Start with the shot of an actor’s face. Vary the shots adjacent to it: a coffin, a plate of soup, a seductive woman lying on a divan. The actor’s expression will be read, alternately, as sadness, hunger, or lust. For the audience, juxtaposition creates meaning. A film is an arrangement of moments, shorter or longer, but every narrative moment is brought into relief by a significant before-moment and a significant after-moment that frames it. Let’s look at the first torture sequence in Zero Dark Thirty to see how this meaning-effect works. Significant before-moment: the powerful opening sequence, dark screen, the terrified voice of a woman trapped in the World Trade Center on 9/11, realizing there’s no help coming, she’s going to die. Central narrative moment: a detainee is water-boarded in the next scene, forced to crawl in a dog collar, hung up naked by the arms, etc. After-moment: the face of Maya, wincing as she watches the torture. I’m cheating on this last. Obviously it’s a reaction shot within a scene, but in terms of meaning, it provides a bookend to the torture moment just as surely as the 9/11 sequence bookends it from the other side. To see the truth of this, imagine an opening with the before and after moments removed. We would be watching a brutal torture scene with no comment whatsoever—that is to say, we’d be in a neo-realist film that lets us observe and come to our own conclusions, that avoids (ideally) telling us what to feel. Instead, the torture moment is framed as a reaction to 9/11, an over-reaction maybe but understandable in context and perhaps in the end—we have to entertain this possibility—excusable. Now let’s look at the work of Maya’s reaction shot (remembering that it’s precisely the reaction shot, a way to locate the audience member in the movie by offering him/her a surrogate who reacts to events the way we would given the chance—it’s precisely this key device of classic Hollywood Film that Neo-Realism rejected because it lulled us so easily into unthinking). Maya winces. We would too, humanists and democrats that we are. But she stays in the room, gritting her teeth, going against her nature. Sometimes, the film whispers, you have to make hard choices, to take hard measures—a celluloid lesson in ‘dirty hands’ moral philosophy."


Thomas Elsaesser: "As far as Hollywood is concerned, it wants audiences to interact with images, while Hollywood itself acts with the images. Which is to say, for the industry that makes them, images are instructions for actions — they trigger further moves, purchases and events — rather than pictures to contemplate or immerse yourself in, however much “immersion” might be the stated objective. In this respect, Avatar the film functions itself as an “avatar” in the larger system, of which it is the most successful representative. Hence my argument that when Hollywood films allegorize their own conditions of possibility, which are by necessity contradictory, they perform cognitive switches or enact a reversibility of roles: a master–slave relationship that never stabilizes itself."


Koutsourakis, Angelos. "Cinema of the Body: The Politics of Performativity in Lars von Triers Dogville and Yorgos Lanthimos's Dogtooth." CINEMA: Journal of Philosophy and the Movies #3 (2012)





Dialogic: Resources for May 30, 2013




Hudson, David. "Roman Polanski’s Venus in Fur: “It’s refreshing to witness a reinvigorated Polanski willing to once again delve deep into seedy psychodrama.” Keyframe (May 31, 2014)

Friday, May 30, 2014

Avatar (USA/UK: James Cameron, 2009)



Avatar (USA/UK: James Cameron, 2009: 162 mins)

Davis, Adam. "Native images: the otherness and affectivity of the digital body." Jump Cut #55 (Fall 2013)

Jenkins, Henry. "Avatar Activism and Beyond." Confessions of an Aca-Fan (September 22, 2010)

McCormack, Tom. "The Two Horizons: What Avatar and Pedro Costa can tell us about narrative cinema today." Moving Image Source (August 9, 2011)

Taylor, Bron. "Battleground Pandora: The War over James Cameron's Avatar." Bright Lights Film Journal (January 25, 2014)

Thomas, Steve. "Avatar and Postcolonial Theory." Theory Teacher's Blog (January 28, 2010)

Monday, May 26, 2014

Resources for May 27, 2014

Row 3: "Cannes 2014 Award Winners"

Sobchack, Vivian. "Fleshing out the image: Phenomenology, Pedagogy, and Derek Jarman's Blue." CINEMA: Journal of Philosophy and the Moving Image #3 (2012)

"The Importance of Depth of Frame." imgur (September 2013)

Branco, Patrícia Silveirinha Castello. "Editorial: Cinema, The Body, and Embodiment." CINEMA: Journal of Philosophy and the Moving Image #3 (2012)


Dialogic Cinephilia archives:

Top Films of 1996

Top Films of 2012

The Turin Horse (Hungary/Germany/France/Switzerland/USA: Bela Tarr, 2011)


Adams, Sam, et al. "The Long Goodbye." Cinephiliacs #38 (May 11, 2014)

Koehler, Robert. "The Thinking Image: Fred Kelemen on Béla Tarr and The Turin Horse." Cinema Scope #46 (Spring 2011)





The Turin Horse (Hungary/Germany/France/Switzerland/USA: Bela Tarr, 2011)



The Turin Horse (Hungary/Germany/France/Switzerland/USA: Bela Tarr, 2011: 146 mins)

Cutler, Aaron. "Multiple Vision: Deciphering the isolated gazes in the films of Béla Tarr." Multiple Image Source (February 2012)

Handley, David. "The Turin Horse and the End of Civilization As We Know It." Offscreen (April 30, 2012)

Koehler, Robert. "The Thinking Image: Fred Kelemen on Béla Tarr and The Turin Horse." Cinema Scope #46 (Spring 2011)

Kreider, Timothy. "The End of Everything: Apocalyptic Films." Jump Cuts #55 (Fall 2013)

Thursday, May 22, 2014

Resources for May 25, 2013




Kiang, Jessica. "50th Anniversary: 8 JFK Assassination Films That Revisit History." The Playlist (November 20, 2013)

Dialogic Cinephilia archives:

JFK (USA/France: Oliver Stone, 1991)

Top Films of 1975

Top Films of 1991

Top Films of 2013

Lethem, Jonathan. "The Ecstasy of Influence." Harpers (February 2007)


Today, most graduate students are in such a hurry to “professionalize” and “talk the talk” of their disciplines that they often forget to attend to their own experience of “seeing” and “listening” — or they devalue it. Instead, they rush to quote others, and describe their objects of study through a range of “floating signifiers” that tend to overdetermine and foreclose their objects and their descriptions before the latter have even really begun. Hermeneutically sophisticated yet overly dependent upon “received knowledge,” these students are also secretly insecure and worried that everyone else ‘knows’ more than they do — and intellectually aware of “the death of the subject,” they are highly suspicious of their own “subjective” experience. They ignore, mistrust, and devalue it as trivial, mistaken, or irrelevantly singular — this last, a false, indeed arrogant, humility that unwittingly rejects intersubjectivity, sociality, and culture. Thus, ignoring the apodicticity (or initial certainty) and presence of their own lived-bodies engaged in being-in-the-world (and in the cinema), their thought about the world (and cinema) has no existential ground of its own from which to empirically proceed. Phenomenological inquiry affords redress to this contemporary situation: it insists we dwell on the ground of experience before moving on to more abstract or theoretical concerns, that we experience and reflect upon our own sight before we (dare I pun?) cite others. [From Vivian Sobchack, "Fleshing out the image: Phenomenology, Pedagogy, and Derek Jarman's Blue." CINEMA: Journal of Philosophy and the Moving Image #3 (2012)



Wheatley, Ben. "A Field in England." The Seventh Art #19 (March 2014)

Daesler, Graham. "The Fall of the House of Warner: The Warner Brothers." Bright Lights Film Journal #82 (November 2013)

Friday, May 16, 2014

The Wolf of Wall Street (USA: Martin Scorsese, 2013)



The Wolf of Wall Street (USA: Martin Scorsese, 2013: 180 mins)

Bordwell, David. "Understanding Film Narrative: The Trailer." Observations on Film Art (January 12, 2014)

Bowen, Chuck. "The Cloud over THE WOLF: On the rise of the ‘Leonardo DiCaprio’ character." Keyframe (January 12, 2014)

Carvajal, Nelson and Max Winter. "Video Essay: Women in the Works of Martin Scorsese." Press Play (February 7, 2014)

Chang, Justin, Peter Debruge and Scott Foundas. "3View: Taking Stock of ‘The Wolf of Wall Street’." Variety (December 23, 2013)

DiCaprio, Leonardo. "The Wolf of Wall Street." The Treatment (May 11, 2016)

Foundas, Scott. "The Wolf of Wall Street." Variety (December 17, 2013)

Koresky, Michael and Jeff Reichert. "Martin Scorsese: He Is Cinema." Reverse Shot (September 17, 2014)

Morton, Drew. "The American Dream in Film: As the man said, ‘America’s not a country. It’s just a business.’" Keyframe (May 30, 2016)

---. "'Look. I Know You're Not Following What I'm Saying Anyway.': The Problem of the 'Video Essay' and Scorsese as Cinematic Essayist." [in]Transition (December 12, 2014)

Pepe, Michael. "Eating, sleeping and watching movies in the shadow of what they do: Representing capitalism in post 2008 popular films." Jump Cut #57 (Fall 2016)

Perlberg, Steven. "We Saw Wolf Of Wall Street With A Bunch Of Wall Street Dudes And It Was Disturbing." Business Insider (December 19, 2013)

Pinkerton, Nick. "The Wolf of Wall Street." Bombast (December 27, 2013)



Martin Scorsese - The Art of Silence from Tony Zhou on Vimeo.







Resources for May 16, 2014

Dialogic Cinephilia archives:

Top Films of 2011

The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 (Sweden: Göran Olsson, 2011)


Falzon, Christopher. "Philosophy Through Film." The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy (No Date)

Hudson, David. "Patrice Chereau’s QUEEN MARGOT:'Imagine a Gallic-history encyclopedia written by Clive Barker.'" Keyframe (May 9, 2014)




Dirks, Tim. "Film Genres: Origins and Types." Filmsite (Entire section of the website)

---. "Major Film Genres." Filmsite (Entire section of the website broken up into sub-sections on Action, Adventure, Comedy, Crime & Gangster, Drama, Epics/Historical, Horror, Musicals/Dance, Science Fiction, War, Westerns)

Dialogic: Resources for May 16, 2014

Choi, Jinhee and Mitsuyo Wada-Marciano. Horror to the Extreme: Changing Boundaries in Asian Cinema. Hong Kong University Press, 2009.

Murray, Noel. "The year in international films: An embarrassment of overlooked riches." The Dissolve (December 12, 2013)

Monday, May 12, 2014

The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 (Sweden: Göran Olsson, 2011)



The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 (Sweden: Göran Olsson, 2011: 100 mins)

Cleaver, Kathleen, Danny Glover and Brian Jones. "The Black Power Mixtape." We Are Many (May 7, 2014) ["The New School and Haymarket Books present: Danny Glover, Kathleen Cleaver, and Brian Jones discussing the new book: The Black Power Mixtape: 1967-1975. Moderated by School of Media Studies Assistant Professor, Michelle Materre. The Black Power Mixtape: 1967 -- 1975 is an extraordinary window into the black freedom struggle in the United States, offering a treasure trove of fresh archival information about the Black Power movement from 1967 to 1975 and vivid portraits of some of its most dynamic participants, including Angela Davis and Stokely Carmichael. The book — like the documentary film that inspired it — includes historical speeches and interviews by: Stokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture), Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Eldridge Cleaver, Bobby Seale, Huey P. Newton, Emile de Antonio, and Angela Davis. And it also features new commentary voiced by: Erykah Badu, Talib Kweli, Harry Belafonte, Kathleen Cleaver, Angela Davis, Robin Kelley, Abiodun Oyewole, Sonia Sanchez, Bobby Seale, John Forte, and Questlove."]

Tate, Greg. "Fight for rights, will to power: The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975." Sight and Sound (December 2011)

White, Rob. "Interview with Göran Hugo Olsson." Film Quarterly (Winter 2011)









Resources for May 12, 2014

Burchett, William, Brian Risselada and Josh Ryan. "Claire Denis." Syndromes and a Cinema #3 (October 17, 2011)

Risselada, Brian, Josh Ryan and Max Slobodin. "Queer Cinema." Syndromes and a Cinema #5 (May 17, 2013)


Dialogic Cinephilia archives:

Top Films of 1970

Top Films of 2000


Ehrenstein, David. "TRANS-EUROP-EXPRESS or Alain Robbe-Grillet Goes Boating: On the many ways one can enjoy the ride." Keyframe (May 2, 2014)
Dialogic archive: Resources for May 12, 2014











Cleaver, Kathleen, Danny Glover and Brian Jones. "The Black Power Mixtape." We Are Many (May 7, 2014) ["The New School and Haymarket Books present: Danny Glover, Kathleen Cleaver, and Brian Jones discussing the new book: The Black Power Mixtape: 1967-1975. Moderated by School of Media Studies Assistant Professor, Michelle Materre. The Black Power Mixtape: 1967 -- 1975 is an extraordinary window into the black freedom struggle in the United States, offering a treasure trove of fresh archival information about the Black Power movement from 1967 to 1975 and vivid portraits of some of its most dynamic participants, including Angela Davis and Stokely Carmichael. The book — like the documentary film that inspired it — includes historical speeches and interviews by: Stokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture), Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Eldridge Cleaver, Bobby Seale, Huey P. Newton, Emile de Antonio, and Angela Davis. And it also features new commentary voiced by: Erykah Badu, Talib Kweli, Harry Belafonte, Kathleen Cleaver, Angela Davis, Robin Kelley, Abiodun Oyewole, Sonia Sanchez, Bobby Seale, John Forte, and Questlove."]


Friday, May 9, 2014

Chocolat (France/West Germany/Cameroon: Claire Denis, 1988)



Chocolat (France/West Germany/Cameroon: Claire Denis, 1988: 105 mins)

Agatucci, Cora. "Chocolat: Film Guide and Resources." (HUM 221 at Central Oregon Community College: 2007)

Anderson, Melissa. "THE SENSATIONALIST: CLAIRE DENIS’S 'CHOCOLAT' RETURNS, STILL SENSUAL AND ILLUMINATING." The Village Voice (September 15, 2015)

Burchett, William, Brian Risselada and Josh Ryan. "Claire Denis." Syndrome and a Cinema #3 (October 17, 2011)

Canby, Vincent. "Chocolat (1988): Caught and Not Caught in Cameroon." The New York Times (March 10, 1989)

Craven, Marie and Raphael Caputo. "Chocolat: An Interview with Claire Denis." Drop In ... and Get Lost (June 11, 2011)

Dinning, Samantha. "Great Directors: Claire Denis." Senses of Cinema (April 2009)

Ebert, Roger. "Chocolat." Chicago Sun-Times (May 12, 1989)

Funderburg, Christopher, et al. "Claire Denis." Wrong Reel #122 (April 3, 2016)

Hughes, Darren and Michael Leary. "Claire Denis." Movie Mezzanine (2015)

Reardon, Kiva. "Claire Denis and Objects of Desire." Keyframe (March 3, 2016)

Sandars, Diane. "Chocolat." Senses of Cinema (November 2001)

Ventura, Elbert. "Colonial Architecture: Chocolat." Reverse Shot #29 (2009)

Wood, Robin. "Claire Denis: Cinema of Transgression, Part 1." Film International (April 1, 2011)























Resources for May 9, 2014

Brailsford, Zachary Phillip, et al. "Tsai Ming-liang." Syndromes and a Cinema (August 28, 2011)


Dialogic archives:

Resources for May 7, 2014

Resources for May 9, 2014


Dialogic Cinephilia archives: Top Films of 2013

Oldboy (South Korea: Chan-Wook Park, 2003)

Hefland, Glen. "Jem Cohen: Memory and the Museum." Keyframe (June 19, 2013)

Vick, Tom. "The Smithsonian's Curator of Asian Film on Where Spike Lee's Oldboy Fails." The Smithsonian (December 5, 2013)

Ebert, Roger. "How To Read a Movie." Roger Ebert's Journal (August 30, 2008)

Stephens, Gregory. "Recording the Rhythm of Change: A Rhetoric of Revolution in The Square." Bright Lights Film Journal (May 7, 2014)

Cohen, Andrew. "40 Years Later, the Cruelty of Papillon is a Reality in U.S. Prisons: Two generations after the famous film about solitary confinement first appeared, it's still relevant to the deplorable treatment of inmates in America's prisons today." The Atlantic (December 16, 2013)

Wednesday, May 7, 2014

ENG 281/282 Film Studies Resources

[MB: Ongoing archive. Note to Fall 2014 ENG 281 students, all resources for films we watch in class will be in this link below "Fall 2014 ENG 281: 1970-1975 Films"]

Adichie, Chimamanda Ngozi. "The danger of a single story." TED Talks (July 2009)

BCTC Film Studies Library Guide (Ongoing archives: Compiled by Jenni Link)

Benton, Michael Dean. Letterboxd Profile

---. "Top Films From 1930 to the Present." Dialogic Cinema (Ongoing Archives)

Bordwell, David. "Three Dimensions of Film Narrative." Observations of Film Art (Excerpted chapter 3 from Poetics of Cinema. NY: Routledge, 2007.)

Cheney, Matthew. "What is Composition?" Press Play (September 2, 2014)

Choi, Jinhee and Mitsuyo Wada-Marciano. Horror to the Extreme: Changing Boundaries in Asian Cinema. Hong Kong University Press, 2009.

"Cultural Theory/Humanities." (Ongoing Archive)

"Dialogic Cinephilia Theory." (Ongoing archive)

Dirks, Tim. "Film Genres: Origins and Types." Filmsite (Entire section of the website)

---. "Major Film Genres." Filmsite (Entire section of the website broken up into sub-sections on Action, Adventure, Comedy, Crime & Gangster, Drama, Epics/Historical, Horror, Musicals/Dance, Science Fiction, War, Westerns)

Ebert, Roger. "How To Read a Movie." Roger Ebert's Journal (August 30, 2008)

Embodied Cinema (Ongoing Archive)

"ENG 281/282: Thinking About Films and Filmmaking." Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

"Fall 2014 ENG 281: 1971-1975 Films." Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

Falzon, Christopher. "Philosophy Through Film." The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy (No Date)

Ferguson, Kirby. "Everything is a Remix." [Four short videos examining remix aesthetics in multiple art forms.]

"Film Analysis 2.0" Yale Film Studies (No Date)

Forster, Peter. "Fifty Shades of Ick: Gay Panic and Star Discourse/Star Panic and Gay Discourse." Bright Lights Film Journal (August 27, 2014)

Ginsburg, Sarah. "Anatomy of the Filmmaker: Varda, the Maysles, Blank and Timoner." Keyframe (September 25, 2014) ["An infographical take on the philosophies, approaches and technological habits of a few key documentary heroes."]

Goldstein, Jessica. “What A Murder Professor Learned From Watching Every Execution Scene In American Film.” Talking Points Memo (August 5, 2014)

Ham, Robert. "The Song Remains the Same? Except when it doesn’t: a list of songs inspired by movies." Keyframe (April 28, 2014)

Hediger, Vinzenz. "What Do we Know When We Know Where Something Is? World Cinema and the Question of Spatial Ordering." Screening the Past (October 2013)

Heller, Zoe and Daniel Mendelsohn. "What Are We Meant to Get Out of Movies Based on Short Stories and Novels?" The New York Times (December 29, 2013)

Holmes, Linda. "Rating The Ratings And Whither The Weather Movie." Pop Culture Happy Hour (August 15, 2014) ["When Stephen and I talked about Boyhood, one of our side conversations was about our bafflement that it was rated R, and this week, joined by Code Switch's Kat Chow, we dig a little deeper into that question. Are ratings really information for parents, or are they still judgments on the morality of your creation? Is there anywhere to go past what a past documentary already explored? Kat talks about being carded at the movies, Stephen compares film boyhood to real boyhood, and we hear from Julie Andrews on the topic of reason."]

Hope, Ted. "32 Qualities Of Better Film." Lets Make Better Films (November 25, 2010)

"The Importance of Depth of Frame." imgur (September 2013)

Lethem, Jonathan. "The Ecstasy of Influence." Harpers (February 2007)

Mandarino, Grant. "Photography and Marxism." We are Many (June 26, 2014) ["This talk provides an introductory overview of critical approaches to the subject of photography over the course of the 20th century, with particular attention paid to the question: How do photographs shape our experience of the world? The presentation focuses on how Marxists have dealt with this medium and its ability to harness or subvert ideological positions both in practice and theory."]

Merriam-Webster's Word-of-the-Day

Mooney, James. "The Problem of Evil in Film." Filmosophy (March 17, 2013)

---. "What is Film Studies." Filmosophy (February 26, 2013)

Morris, Wesley. "Let’s Be Real: Let’s Be Cops, cop movies, and the shooting in Ferguson." Grantland (August 15, 2014)

Mulready, Cyrus. "How to Read a Film." (Handout: No Date)

Palmer, Landon. "6 Filmmaking Tips From Earl Morris." Film School Rejects (September 25, 2013)

Pariser, Eli. "Beware Online 'Filter Bubbles.'" TED Talks (May 2, 2011)

Reardon, Kiva. "The ABCs of Trouble Every Day: Sex, Love and Death." Keyframe (August 19, 2014)

Rombes, Nicholas. "The Blue Velvet Project." Filmmaker (2011-2012)

Schuchardt, Read Mercer. "Cinema—The New Cathedral of Hollyworld: How films are replacing religion in our cinematic age." Metaphilm (November 9, 2001)

Shambu, Girish. "Difficult Cinema." Girish (February 23, 2011)

Smith, Greg M. "'It's Just a Movie': A Teaching Essay for Introductory Media Classes'" Cinema Journal 41.1 (Fall 2001)

Smith, Stacy L., et al. "Gender Bias Without Borders: An Investigation of Female Characters in Popular Films Across 11 Countries." Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media (2014)

Stork, Matthias. "Chaos Cinema: A Breakdown of How 21st-Century Action Films Became Incoherent." Open Culture (January 2, 2014)

Williams, James. "A Guide to Basic Cinematography." Vimeo (2013)

Wood, Robin. "The American Nightmare: Horror in the 70s." Horror, The Film Reader. ed. Marc Jancovich. NY: Routledge, 2002: 25-32.

Zurko, Nicholas. "Gender Inequality in Film." New York Film Academy (November 25, 2013)





Martin Scorsese - The Art of Silence from Tony Zhou on Vimeo.




Resources for May 7, 2014

BCTC Film Studies Library Guide (Ongoing archives: Compiled by Jenni Link)

Zurko, Nicholas. "Gender Inequality in Film." New York Film Academy (November 25, 2013)

Schuchardt, Read Mercer. "Cinema—The New Cathedral of Hollyworld: How films are replacing religion in our cinematic age." Metaphilm (November 9, 2001)


Dialogic Cinephilia archives:

"Dialogic Cinephilia Theory." (Ongoing archive)

Top Films of 1985


Shambu, Girish. "Difficult Cinema." Girish (February 23, 2011)

Dialogic archive: Resources for May 6, 2014

Marlow, Jonathan. "The Art of Filmmaking: Errol Morris." Keyframe (December 13, 2013)

Ferguson, Kirby. "Everything is a Remix." [Four short videos examining remix aesthetics in multiple art forms.]

Ham, Robert. "The Song Remains the Same? Except when it doesn’t: a list of songs inspired by movies." Keyframe (April 28, 2014)