Friday, June 28, 2019

Cultural Capital (Key Concept)

Bourdieu, Pierre. "Forms of Capital." Handbook of Theory of Research for the Sociology of Education ed. J.F. RIchardson. Greenwood Press, 1986: 241-258.

Cole, Nicki Lisa. "What Is Cultural Capital? Do I Have It?" ThoughtCo. (April 8, 2018)

"Cultural Capital: Pierre Bourdieu." Social Theory Re-wired (2016)

Dean, Paul. "The Wire: Cultural Capital of the Streets." Sociological Cinema (July 16, 2015)













Dialogic Cinephilia - June 28, 2019

Camenzind, Franz, et al. "Guardians vs. Gardeners: Relocating wolves to help balance ecology." Ideas (March 12, 2019) ["How much should humans try to "fix" nature? That question gets at the heart of our relationship with the entire natural world. Contributor Brad Badelt travels to isolated Isle Royale National Park in Lake Superior, where a controversial decision has been made to relocate wolves from the mainland to help sustain the island's dwindling pack. The world's leading wolf researchers and environmental thinkers debate that decision — and what our idea of wilderness means."]

"Candidate Spotlight: Warren and Harris." Best of the Left #1251 (February 22, 2019)

Fenwick, James, I.Q. Hunter and Elisa Pezzota. "Stanley Kubrick: A Retrospective. Introduction." Cinergie (December 4, 2017)




Hoberman, J. "Paradise Regained." The Current (September 4, 2007)

Long, Clara. "Trump Admin Moves 100 Migrant Kids Back to 'Child Jail' Despite Concern over Inhumane Conditions." Democracy Now (June 26, 2019) ["The Department of Homeland Security has moved 100 migrant children back to a Border Patrol facility in Clint, Texas, where infants and toddlers have been locked up without adequate food, water, sanitation or medical care, with older children having to care for the younger ones. Around 300 kids were removed from the facility Monday following widespread outrage over the reports, but Customs and Border Protection said some of the children are being sent back, claiming that the facility is no longer overcrowded. Lawyers who recently visited the facility described a scene of chaos and sickness, with children unable to shower or change into clean clothes for weeks on end. We speak with Clara Long, senior researcher at Human Rights Watch. She was part of the monitoring team that visited Border Patrol facilities last week, including Clint."]




Mora, Sergio de la. "Roma: Repatriation vs. Exploitation." Film Quarterly 72.4 (Summer 2019)




Stiepleman, Daniel. "The Incrementalist RBG." Amicus (December 22, 2018) ["A conversation with screenwriter Daniel Stiepleman on the biopic On the Basis of Sex, about his aunt, Ruth Bader Ginsburg."]




Vacche, Angela Dalle. "American Neorealism? Sean Baker’s The Florida Project." Cinergie #13 (2018)

William J. Barber II: Protestant Minister/Political Science/Public Policy Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)








Wednesday, June 26, 2019

William J. Barber II: Protestant Minister/Poor People's Campaign/Political Science/Public Policy

Barber, William J, II. "America's Moral Malady." The Atlantic (February 2018)
["The nation’s problem isn’t that we don’t have enough money. It’s that we don’t have the moral capacity to face what ails society."]

---. "A Moral Challenge to Economists."Institute for Economic Thinking (January 1, 2017)

---. "'Every Crucifixion Needs a Witness.'" Boston Review (May 28, 2019) ["William J. Barber II on the the successes of civil disobedience, the failures of electoral campaigns, and why the South holds the key to transformation in this country. "]

---. "Forward Together, Not One Step Back.'" Berkeley Talks (April 4, 2019)

---. "Grassroots Leader Rev. Dr. William Barber on the Fight for Voting, Civil Rights in North Carolina." Democracy Now (December 4, 2012)

---. "Mississippi Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith Jokes About Hangings, But Her Policies Will Strangle the Poor." Democracy Now (November 26, 2018) ["Mississippi voters will head to the polls Tuesday in the state’s hotly contested runoff senate election, as incumbent Republican Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith faces off against Democrat Mike Espy. In a state that Donald Trump won by 20 percentage points two years ago, Espy is attempting to become Mississippi’s first African-American senator since Reconstruction. His opponent, incumbent Sen. Hyde-Smith, attended and graduated from an all-white segregationist high school and recently posed for photos with a Confederate Army cap and other Confederate artifacts. Earlier this month, a viral video showed Hyde-Smith praising a campaign supporter, saying, “If he invited me to a public hanging, I’d be on the front row.” Mississippi was once considered the lynching capital of the United States. We speak with Rev. Dr. William Barber, co-chair of the Poor People’s Campaign and president and senior lecturer of Repairers of the Breach. He recently traveled to Mississippi to get out the vote."]

---. "On Creating a Fusion Movement to Defeat Trump and Move Forward Together." Building Bridges (November 1, 2017) ["Dr. William Barber is the founder and president of Repairers of the Breach, an organization that seeks to build a progressive agenda rooted in a moral framework to counter the ultra-conservative constructs that try to dominate the public square. Rev. Barber one of the most influential, progressive religious figures in the country. Tens of thousands of men and women rose up in Chicago and cities from coast to coast to demanding that everyone in America have the right to organize and join a union and the Rev. William Barber said “I’m proud to stand with them, because their fight is central to the battle against poverty, racism, and inequality”. Earlier this year Rev. Barber announced an effort by faith and moral leaders to carry forward Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream of a Poor People’s Campaign, working across twenty-five states to alleviate the triad forces of poverty, militarism, and racism that Dr. King knew were poisoning our country then and still threaten us today."]

---. "Racist Gerrymandering Created a GOP Stronghold in the South. We Must Fight Back." Democracy Now (June 10, 2019) ["Longtime civil rights leader Rev. Dr. William Barber joins us to respond to his conviction Thursday for trespassing during a 2017 protest against gerrymandering and attacks on healthcare at the North Carolina Legislature. Barber had refused to leave the General Assembly as ordered, after he organized a sit-in at the legislative building when Republican leaders refused to meet with him about concerns with voter ID requirements and redistricting plans that would weaken the power of the black vote. “We must start connecting systemic racism, most seen through systemic voter suppression and gerrymandering, poverty, the lack of healthcare, environmental devastation and the war economy,” says Barber, the former president of the North Carolina NAACP and a leader of the national Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival. This Wednesday he will join faith leaders and religious groups in Washington, D.C., for a march to the White House to protest the Trump administration’s attacks on the nation’s most vulnerable communities, and next week he hosts the three-day Poor People’s Campaign Moral Action Congress in Washington, D.C., that will draw hundreds of people from across the country for a presidential forum, where both Republican and Democratic candidates will speak."]

---. "Tear Gassing Central American Migrants is Inhumane, Unconstitutional, Immoral." Democracy Now (November 26, 2018) ["U.S. border patrol officers fired tear gas into a crowd of desperate Central American asylum-seekers Sunday in Tijuana, Mexico as some tried to push their way through the heavily militarized border with the United States. Mothers and small children were left gagging and screaming as the tear gas spread. The migrants are from Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador, and are fleeing widespread violence, poverty and mass unemployment. We speak with Rev. Dr. William Barber, co-chair of the Poor People’s Campaign and president and senior lecturer of Repairers of the Breach."]

---. "The Ugly History Behind 'Religious Freedom' Laws." The Progressive Pulse (April 8, 2015)

Barber, William, II, et al. "Amazing Aretha." Open Source (May 2, 2019) ["Aretha Franklin made you believe you were hearing both heaven and earth. Her voice was not of this world: it was “a gift of God,” people have said. She was the reason women want to sing, said Mary J. Blige, who covered Aretha hits. James Baldwin said the way Aretha sings is “the way I want to write.” Our guest Ed Pavlić calls her voice a Hubble telescope, taking us back to the origin of time and truth."]

Cobb, Jelani. "William Barber Takes on Poverty and Race in the Age of Trump." The New Yorker (May 7, 2018)

Curtis, Mary C. "'There Is Not Some Separation Between Jesus and Justice.' How Rev. William J. Barber II Uses His Faith to Fight for the Poor." Time (February 21, 2020)

Laughland, Oliver. "Inspired by Martin Luther King Jr, a new civil rights leader takes center stage." The Guardian (October 25, 2017)





























Tuesday, June 25, 2019

Dialogic Cinephilia - June 2019


Benton, Michael Dean. Director: Pedro Almodovar/Mad Max: Fury Road/Themes: Environment Documentaries/Cannes 2019/Themes: 21st Century Horror/Themes: Mysterious Los Angeles Dialogic Cinephilia (Future film course plan)




Chen, Yun-Hua. "Phantoms from the Past: Gan Bi’s Long Day’s Journey into Night (2018)." Film International (June 19, 2019)

Devlin, Kate. "Love, Sex and Robots." Hidden Brain (March 11, 2019) ["This week on Hidden Brain, we reflect on the narrowing gap between humans and machines. What are the possibilities for deep, intimate relationships with artificial lovers? And does it help if those lovers are beautifully designed to look like human beings and have the faint glow of empathy and intelligence?"]

Hamrah, A.S. "There Will Be Fake Blood: The Chaotic Scenes Behind the Making of a Cult Classic." Bookforum (February/March 2019)

It Follows (USA: David Robert Mitchell, 2014) Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

Kuersten, Erich. "Best of 2017: The Phoenix Scorches the Snake (Year of the Woman)." Acidemic (December 27, 2017)

"Podcasts/Videocasts." Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

Sorrento, Matthew. "Violent Urban Transformation: Ali Vatansever on Saf." Film International (May 7, 2019)











Monday, June 24, 2019

It Follows (USA: David Robert Mitchells, 2014)





It Follows (USA: David Robert Mitchell, 2014: 100 mins)

Abrams, Simon. "It Follows." Roger Ebert (March 13, 2015)

Barone, Matt. "TIFF: Sex Is a Scary Killer in This Early Contender for 2015's Best Horror Movie." Complex (September 9, 2014)

Buchanan, Kyle. "It Follows Spoiler Bomb: The Director Explains All Those Twists and Shocks." Vulture (March 27, 2015)

Crucchiola, Jordan. "What Makes the New Horror Film It Follows So Good?" Wired (March 17, 2015)

Dalton, Ben. "It Follows: Horror in a Straight Line." Intensities #8 (January 2016): 88-93.

Digging Deeper. "It Follows: The American Nightmare." (Posted on Youtube: September 23, 2015)

Drumm, Diana. "Interview: David Robert Mitchell on Making It Follows." Slant (March 19, 2015)

Eggert, Brian. "It Follows." Deep Focus Review (March 27, 2015)

Leeder, Murray. "David Robert Mitchell's It Follows (2014) - The Limits of Knowledge." Horror. ed. Simon Bacon. Peter Lang, 2019: 11-18. [Professor has copy of the book.]

McKee, Lucky. "Talks David Robert Mitchell’s It Follows." Talkhouse (January 29, 2016) ["The director of an indie horror classic shares his appreciation for a new classic – and explains why it made him want to punch a kitten in the balls."]

Muncer, Mike and Tim Robey. "Slashers Pt. 13: It Follows." The Evolution of Horror (December 8, 2017)

Prewitt, Zach. "The Best Horror Cinema of the 21st Cinema." (Posted on Vimeo: October 2016)

Renée, V. "This is What Supernatural Horror Film It Follows is Really About (Besides Scary Sex)." No Film School (February 27, 2016)

Rossi, Jason Di. "It Follows." Final Cut (April 17, 2015)

Salisbury, Brian. "Q&A: It Follows Director David Robert Mitchell On Turning Nightmare into Magic." Film School Rejects (March 30, 2015)

Visvikis, Dylan. "A Pretentious Film Student Analysis of It Follows." Flicks/Kicks/Politics (July 12, 2016)

Wethington, Nicole. "It Follows and the Power of Sex." The Artifice (May 20, 2015)

Yanick, Joseph. "It Follows from Video Gaming: An interview with Soundtrack Composer Disasterpeace." Noisey (April 7, 2015)

















IT FOLLOWS, as a Slasher Video Essay from Haylie Kohn on Vimeo.



Sunday, June 23, 2019

Dialogic Cinephilia - June 23, 2019

Aldred, Jonathan. ""Socialism for the Rich: The Evils of Bad Economics." Audio Long Read (June 14, 2019) ["The economic arguments adopted by Britain and the US in the 1980s led to vastly increased inequality – and gave the false impression that this outcome was not only inevitable, but good."]

Banai, Huss, et al. "John Bolton's War." Open Source (May 16, 2019) ["We’ve seen a lot of this movie before, have we not? The crackling threats to punish unproven charges: it was weapons of mass destruction the last time; now it’s some unverified damage to tanker traffic, maybe. Again, the case is being made for a war of choice, by a pick-up “coalition of the willing”—this time, it would be an alliance of Sunni Arabs with the US and Israel, against Iran. Out front beating the war drum is the man with the mustache, John Bolton, who’s always loved “regime change” for Iran, who still defends the Iraq War, and who now runs the national security desk for President Trump, dropping phrases like “unrelenting force” against Iran if Iran should threaten or damage us. Part of what’s familiar in the picture is that Congress is largely out of the loop and the sovereign people are not in on the argument. A lot of what you can hear on the news is circus stuff, like the President’s lawyer, the sometime Mayor of America, Rudolph Giuliani, chanting, “Regime change!”"]

Greenhouse, Linda. "The Impeachment Question." The New York Review of Books (June 27, 2019)

Luca, Raymond de. "Singing in the Rubble: A Musical Map of the Cold War in Paweł Pawlikowski’s Cold War." Bright Lights Film Journal (June 3, 2019)

"Pedro Almodóvar Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement." La Biennale di Venezia (June 14, 2019)

Soldani, Maria Teresa. "Within the Ruins of New York City: No Wave as a Paradigm of American Independent Cinema." Cinergie (July 12, 2018)






Springer, Claudia. "Shadow Films: Picturing the Environmental Crisis." Jump Cut #58 (Spring 2018) ["For the powerful forces invested in preserving the status quo, even limited environmental protections that threaten traditional modes of corporate profit-making provoke fierce opposition. Corporate stakeholders wield political power through lobbying and donations, and, increasingly, they hold government positions. A 2016 study by the Center for American Progress Action Fund found that 34% of American Congress members denied climate change and had been paid over $73 million in contributions by oil, gas, and coal companies. Oklahoma Senator James Inhofe, who famously claimed that climate change is "the greatest hoax ever perpetrated on the American people," has reportedly accepted more than $2 million from the fossil fuel industry (Herzog). The fallout from political inaction means that people have lost their lives in the U.S., China, Nigeria, Ecuador, and Peru, among other countries, because of the oil, gas, and mining industries' toxic practices and attacks on opponents. The propaganda battles fought with images inflame a war with catastrophic consequences."]

Weisbord, Noah. "Introduction."  The Crime of Aggression: The Quest for Justice in an Age of Drones, Cyberattacks, Insurgents, and Autocrats. Princeton University Press, 2019: 1-7.








Wednesday, June 19, 2019

Dialogic Cinephilia - June 19, 2019

Benton, Michael. Theme: Crime in the Age of Austerity/Theme: Genre & Philosophy/Theme: Work/Theme: Realism. Letterboxd (Future Film Course Plan)

Claverie, Ezra. "From off-brand to franchise: Watchmen as advertisement." Jump Cut #58 (Spring 2018)

Greenberg, Jonathan. "Trump's Financial House of Cards." On the Media (May 10, 2019) ["As we all learned this week, President Trump "lost more money than nearly other individual American taxpayer” between 1985 and 1994. It was during that decade of losses that Trump published The Art of the Deal and became a fixture on the Forbes 400 list of wealthiest Americans. But if his business failures and his debts were so immense, how did he get on the list to begin with? Jonathan Greenberg, now an investigative journalist, was then the Forbesreporter whose unenviable task it was to evaluate Trump’s fabulous claims. Bob spoke with him this week about the origin myth upon which a 37-year-long con was built."]

Kloppenberg, James. "Things Fall Apart: The Origins and Future of American Democracy." Ideas (May 10, 2019) ["Does America’s early experiment with self-rule offer lessons for the U.S. today?"]

Kuersten, Erich. "Best of 2018 (Movies and TV)." Acidemic (December 20, 2018)

Rowley, Rick. "16 Shots: Chicago Police Killing of Laquan McDonald Exposed a System Built on Lies." Democracy Now (June 17, 2019) ["The documentary “16 Shots” examines the 2014 murder of African-American teenager Laquan McDonald in Chicago and the attempt by the city’s police department to cover up the events. McDonald, who was 17, was shot 16 times by former police officer Jason Van Dyke. Van Dyke was found guilty in 2018 of second-degree murder and sentenced to six years and nine months in prison for McDonald’s murder. He was also found guilty on 16 counts of aggravated battery—one count for each of the 16 bullets he fired at McDonald."]




Winkler, Irwin. "On Raging Bull." The Metrograph (May 29, 2019) ["They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?, the Rocky franchise, Raging Bull, Goodfellas, De-Lovely, The Wolf of Wall Street: The producing credits of Irwin Winkler are not short on era-defining, money-making classics. In another time, Winkler may have been a household name on the level of a Goldwyn or a Zanuck, but until now, Winkler was content to let his work speak for itself. With the release of his memoir, A Life In Movies, the 88-year-old producer is finally unleashing fifty years of stories behind Hollywood’s defining movies. Ahead of his weekend of screenings at Metrograph, we are pleased to present an exclusive excerpt from Winkler’s memoir. Have you ever seen Raging Bull and wondered how in the world that movie ever got made? Well, now we know."]











Saturday, June 15, 2019

Dialogic Cinephilia - June 15, 2019

Emsley, John, et al. "The Music of Matter: 150 years of the Periodic Table." Ideas (March 11, 2019) ["The world, the universe, is a mess of molecules and muck. Within the chaos, though, a cosmic harmony plays the secret song of nature, and the music of matter. You just have to be able to read the music. Contributor Ian Wilkinson unravels the universal chords as the world honours the 150th anniversary of Dmitri Mendeleev's creation of the Periodic Table of the Chemical Elements."]

Kofler, Natalie. "What role should humans play in editing nature?" When We Talk About Animals (November 19, 2018) ["A few years ago, our guest, molecular biologist Dr. Natalie Kofler, was completing her postdoctoral training at Yale University. She was actively using CRISPR gene-editing techniques to study the mammalian cardiovascular system to try to develop better tools to treat human vascular diseases. While attending talks on conservation biology at the Yale School of Forestry, she started to wonder: Could the invasive emerald ash borer be genetically edited with these same techniques to save American ash trees? Could coral reefs be genetically edited to be more resilient to warming waters? Should humans develop and use these technologies to change nature? If so, how? And who gets to decide? Today Dr. Kofler is a leading thinker on these questions and an important voice on the potential environmental applications of gene-editing technologies — technologies that have the extraordinary potential to end malaria or to suppress Lyme disease, but also to change or delete entire species and to transform life in previously unimaginable ways. To think clearly about their use, she says, forces us to rethink who we are, to define what is important to us, and to reconsider how far our human knowledge of nature’s interconnectedness extends."]




Lane, Penny. "Hail Satan?" Radio West (May 10, 2019) [MB - I was interested in seeing this documentary and after listening to this discussion with the director Penny Lane I'm thinking it could be a great opportunity in my Peace Studies' courses for discussing the problems with authoritarian impulses and rigid/controlling dogmas of traditional/mainstream religions (or any dominant/controlling ideology/worldview).]




Language: A Feminist Guide ["This is a feminist blog about language (in fact, mostly the English language), written by a feminist who’s also a linguist. In this space I’ll try to address some frequently asked questions, debunk some common myths, and ponder some of the linguistic dilemmas confronting feminists in the 21st century."]

Nimkar, Nilesh. "What Standarised Testing Doesn't Tell Us About Learning." Inter Press Service (June 6, 2019)




Zwick, Edward. "Trial by Fire." The Treatment (May 24, 2019) ["Director Edward Zwick thrives in the historical drama genre which such epic films as "Blood Diamond" and "Glory". Today on The Treatment, Zwick discusses his most recent politically charged project "Trial By Fire" about an incarcerated man gaining an unlikely journalist ally played by Laura Dern while also examining the industry of the death penalty in America, particularly in Texas."]













Thursday, June 13, 2019

Dialogic Cinephilia - June 13, 2019


Barber, William."Racist Gerrymandering Created a GOP Stronghold in the South. We Must Fight Back." Democracy Now (June 10, 2019) ["Longtime civil rights leader Rev. Dr. William Barber joins us to respond to his conviction Thursday for trespassing during a 2017 protest against gerrymandering and attacks on healthcare at the North Carolina Legislature. Barber had refused to leave the General Assembly as ordered, after he organized a sit-in at the legislative building when Republican leaders refused to meet with him about concerns with voter ID requirements and redistricting plans that would weaken the power of the black vote. “We must start connecting systemic racism, most seen through systemic voter suppression and gerrymandering, poverty, the lack of healthcare, environmental devastation and the war economy,” says Barber, the former president of the North Carolina NAACP and a leader of the national Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival. This Wednesday he will join faith leaders and religious groups in Washington, D.C., for a march to the White House to protest the Trump administration’s attacks on the nation’s most vulnerable communities, and next week he hosts the three-day Poor People’s Campaign Moral Action Congress in Washington, D.C., that will draw hundreds of people from across the country for a presidential forum, where both Republican and Democratic candidates will speak."]

Benton, Michael. Theme: Abortion/Theme: Couples Coping with Trauma/Theme: Skateboarding/Theme: Neo-Noir. Dialogic Cinephilia (Future Film Course Plan)

Churchwell, Sarah. "The Lehman Trilogy and Wall Street's Debt to Slavery." NYR Daily (June 11, 2019) [MB - Excellent critique of a popular play's historical misrepresentation of the Lehman family saga (also makes the connection to that other theatrical sensation Hamilton) and monopoly-finance capital's dependence on slavery (throughout the system - not just the South) to build immense wealth.]

Engh, Catherine. "Assembling Climate Change Pedagogies for the Humanities." Center for the Humanities (May 28, 2019)



Lenker, Maureen Lee. "Jennifer Tilly and Gina Gershon revisit their lesbian neo-noir Bound." Entertainment Weekly (June 6, 2019)

Luxenberg, Steve. "Separate and Unequal." On the Media (March 8, 2019)  ["Throughout the 1800s, the question at the heart of nearly every political, cultural and academic conversation dealt in some capacity with whether Black Americans were eligible for full citizenship. Our collective understanding of 19th-century racial politics depends on the landmark civil rights legislation that came out of the era. One notorious decision was Plessy v. Ferguson, the case in which the Supreme Court confirmed the constitutionality of racial separation, helping to pave the way for nearly 60 years of Jim Crow laws. Though the decision was overturned by the 1954Brown v. Board of Education decision, the de facto segregation Plessy codified continues into the present. But at the time, Plessy wasn’t deemed newsworthy — at least not by the white-dominated, partisan press. To contextualize the road to Plessy, Bob spoke with Steve Luxenberg, author of the new book, Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation."]

McCall, Leyla. "Leyla McCall Has The Capitalist Blues." World Cafe (May 8, 2019) ["As you may guess from the title of her third solo album, Leyla McCalla tackles social and economic issues pretty directly on The Capitalist Blues. The multi-instrumentalist and Carolina Chocolate Drops alumna sings about everything from injustice and poverty to her daughter's experience with elevated levels of lead. And although the topics are heavy, the music is danceable — a treatment informed by the troubadour traditions of McCalla's Haitian roots and the Cajun and Zydeco traditions of her adopted home in New Orleans. In this session, McCalla talks about her parents' work as Haitian human rights activists and how the history of her people and the attitudes of her parents inspired her to tackle social issues through art. And McCalla performs live."]





Puhr, Thomas. "Giving by Stealing: Denys Arcand’s The Fall of the American Empire." Film International (June 13, 2019)

MB - Rarely have I come across a film that portrays the chaotic and fractured nature of teen life (even at the best of times) without descending into grotesque stereotypes, banal moral messages, or hallmark hopefulness - this is a great example of a film that escapes this while retaining a sincere humanistic portrayal of the people involved (everyone).
On another note, we seem to have a 21st Century genre of skateboarding films.








Sunday, June 9, 2019

Slurring Bee #24

Also need 15 absurd/quirky warm up questions

1st Round: warm-up question followed by a word
2nd Round: 3 words in succession for each contestant
3rd Round: Round-robin until we have a winner (keep track of last three - the order they come in)
3 mispelled words and a contestant is out

Pronouncer Information 1. Read carefully the Judges, Recorders, Spellers and Audiences information that is included in the Scripps pronouncers’ guide. 2. Familiarize yourself with all words on the confidential word list. Pronunciation is important. A meeting with the judges to insure pronunciation of words and procedures will be scheduled prior to the Bee beginning. 3. Speak clearly for contestants, judges and audience alike. Grant all requests to repeat a word until the judges agree that the word has been made reasonably clear to the speller. You may request the speller to speak more clearly or louder. 4. “Pace” yourself. You need time to focus attention on the pronunciation of the new word and the judges need a few moments between each contestant to do their tasks.

Speller’s Information 1. Each speller needs to focus on the Pronouncer, to aid his or her hearing and understanding of the context of the word. A speller may ask for the word to be repeated, for its use in a sentence, for a definition, for the part of speech, and for the language of origin. 2. Each speller should pronounce the word before and after spelling it. If the speller fails to pronounce the word after spelling it, the judge may ask if they are finished. If they say yes, the judge will remind the speller to remember to repeat the word the next time. (No speller will be eliminated for failing to pronounce a word.) 3. When a speller is at the podium spelling, the next speller should be standing at a marked location ready to proceed to the podium.

524) cryptid

525) copacetic

526) placebo

527) physiology

528) ekphrasis

529) rhetoric

530) proprioception

531) algorithm

532) ambiguous

533) 


Thursday, June 6, 2019

Dialogic Cinephilia - June 6, 2019

Barber-Plentie, Grace, et al. "After Agnès Varda: A Discussion." Another Gaze (April 8, 2019)

Bourgeois, Robyn and Marion Buller. "Damning Canadian Inquiry Calls the Murder and Disappearance of Indigenous Women & Girls Genocide." Democracy Now (June 4, 2019) ["A chilling national inquiry has determined that the frequent and widespread disappearance and murder of indigenous girls and women in Canada is a genocide that the government itself is responsible for. The findings were announced by the Canadian National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls at a ceremony on Monday with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the families of victims. Many in the audience held red flowers to commemorate the dead. The national inquiry was convened after the body of 15-year-old Tina Fontaine from the Sagkeeng First Nation was found in the Red River in Winnipeg, Manitoba, in 2014. The report follows decades of anguish and anger as indigenous communities have called for greater attention to the epidemic of dead and missing indigenous women, girls and two-spirit, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, intersex and asexual people. Some 1,500 family members of victims and survivors gave testimony to the commission, painting a picture of violence, state-sanctioned neglect, and “pervasive racist and sexist stereotypes” that led nearly 1,200 indigenous women and girls to die or go missing between 1980 and 2012. Indigenous activists say this number could be a massive undercount, as many deaths go unreported and unnoticed. We speak with Marion Buller, chief commissioner of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, and Robyn Bourgeois, assistant professor in the Centre for Women’s and Gender Studies at Brock University."]

Campbell, Robert. "Small Form Films: The (Non-) Cinema of Mike Ott." Jump Cut #58 (Spring 2018)

Class (Key Concept) Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

Denis, Claire. "High Life." The Treatment (April 26, 2019) ["Despite his young age, French director Claire Denis knew after meeting actor Robert Pattinson she'd found the lead for her film. "High Life" tells the eerie story of a man and his baby trapped among the last survivors of a deep space mission. For Denis, this film was best represented as an examination of humanity through the lens of youth. Today on The Treatment, Denis discusses her need to juxtapose life against death in her new film and explains the mark that growing up in French colonized West Africa made on her life and film making."]

Gilmore, Ruth Wilson. "Ruth Wilson Gilmore with Rachel Kushner." Lannan Podcasts (April 17, 2019) ["Ruth Wilson Gilmore is director of the Center for Place, Culture, and Politics and a professor of geography at the City University of New York. She is most famous for arguing that the movement for abolition, with its proud history of challenging slavery, should be applied today to the abolition of prisons. In an era when 2.3 million people are behind bars in the United States, she challenges us to think about whether it is ever necessary or productive to lock people in cages. She warns of the “nightmare made palatable by the terrifying numbers of prisoners and prisons produced by the last generation, while we were all, presumably, awake.” But her hope lies in the fact that “just as real was the growing grassroots activism against the expanded use of criminalization and cages as a catchall solution to social problems. In order to realize their dreams of justice in individual cases, the [freedom] riders decided, through struggle, debate, failure, and renewal, that they must seek general freedom for all from a system in which punishment has become as industrialized as making cars, clothes, or missiles, or growing cotton.” Gilmore wrote Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing California(2007) and contributed to The Revolution Will Not Be Funded: Beyond the Non-Profit Industrial Complex (2007). The American Sociological Society honored Gilmore with its Angela Davis Award for Public Scholarship in 2012. A tireless activist, she has co-founded many social justice organizations, including the California Prison Moratorium Project, Critical Resistance, and the Central California Environmental Justice Network."]

Kaptchuk, Ted. "All The World's A Stage—Including The Doctor's Office." Hidden Brain (April 29, 2019) ["... we consider what it means to be sick and what it means to heal, and the powerful tool that modern medicine has overlooked."]











Monday, June 3, 2019

Class (Key Concept)




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Abu-Jamal, Mumia and Michael Parenti. "Created Unequal (Law, Money and Mumia Abu-Jamal)." Unwelcome Guests #6 (April 12, 2000)

Alexander, Michelle. "The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Jim Crow." We Are Many (September 12, 2012)

Alperovitz, Gar. "America Beyond Capitalism." Unwelcome Guests #637 (January 5, 2013)

Aronowitz, Nona Willis. "Half of Americans Getting Government Aid Swear They've Never Used Government Programs." GOOD (July 9, 2011)

Baker, Dean. "The Hedge Fund Managers Tax Break: Because Wall Streeters Want Your Money." Truthout (April 14, 2014)

Balzarini, John and Les Bernal. "Gambling and Neoliberal Rot - How Our Most Regressive Tax Flies Under the Radar." Citations Needed #63 (January 23, 2019) ["As more and more states turn to casinos and lotteries to ‘fill the gap” in 'falling' state budgets, the predatory and regressive nature of gambling as an alternative to increasing taxes on the rich avoids nearly any media scrutiny among centrists and liberals. Even the Left has mostly ignored the issue––ceding criticism of our most regressive tax to the Christian Right, who largely oppose gambling for all the wrong reasons. In this episode, we explore how lotteries and casinos have come to represent the last throes of the false neoliberal promise of "jobs” and “growth.” Throughout much of the United States, specifically the Rust Belt and Midwest, casinos and prisons are increasingly the only growth industries, entrenching the shift from an industrial economy to one that exclusively preys on the poor and desperate in a never-ending race to the bottom. Beyond the glitz and easy “tax revenue” lies a massive transfer of wealth from the poor, black and elderly to the super wealthy - achieved, slowly over decades, with zero sustained criticism from the media."]

Baxter, Joan. "How corporate tax breaks hurt humanity. Truth be told: taxation is only certain for the ordinary law-abiding citizen, the non-rich." Rabble (March 18, 2011)

Blanc, Eric, et al. "Teachers at the forefront of a resurgent progressive labor movement." Best of the Left #1250 (February 15, 2019) ["Today we take a look at recent teachers union strike in the Los Angeles school district and see it as another event in an emerging pattern of progressive uprisings that have been stirring for the last decade, fighting back against the status quo, the neoliberal instinct to privatize everything for the ultimate benefit of billionaires."]

Buchanan, Jack. "Train to Busan - A Masterpiece of Social Commentary." Filmosophy (August 8, 2020)

 Buford, Talia, et al. "Home Sweet Home (Housing and Homelessness)." Best of the Left #1040 (September 2, 2016) ["Today we take a look at a couple of solutions to homelessness as well as some of the forces at play that effect how and where people live across the country."]

Blyth, Mark, David Kaiser and Vanessa Williamson. "The French Sensation: Income Inequality in 700 Pages and a Hundred Graphs." Radio Open Source (May 1, 2014)

"Busted: America's Poverty Myths." On the Media (September 28 - October 28, 2016) ["On the Media’s series on poverty is grounded in the Talmudic notion that “We do not see things as they are. We see things as we are.” Brooke Gladstone traveled to Ohio to learn from people living the varied reality of poverty today, and to unpack the myths that shape our private presumptions as well as our policy decisions. In each episode, we feature the voices and complex stories of individuals, as well essential context from scholars, to lay open the tales we tell ourselves."]

"The Card Game." Frontline (Documentary and resource website: November 24, 2009)

"Chile Learns the Price of Economic Inequality." The New York Times (October 22, 2019)

Chomsky, Noam. "The Emerging World Order." Unwelcome Guests #622 (September 22, 2012)

---."Occupy Wall Street "Has Created Something That Didn’t Really Exist" in U.S. — Solidarity." Democracy Now (May 14, 2012)

---. "The State-Corporate Complex: A Threat to Freedom and Survival." Needs No Introduction (April 21, 2011)

Connor, J.D., Florence Dore and Dan Sinykin. "Rebel Yale: Reading and Feeling Hillbilly Elegy." Los Angeles Review of Books (January 10, 2018)

Cooper, Donna. "Infographic: Tax Breaks vs. Budget Cuts." Center for American Progress (February 22, 2011)

Deaton, Angus. "On How the Flaws in Capitalism are Fatal for America’s Working Class." Keen On (March 13, 2020) ["Over the last two hundred years, nothing has divided us more than our free-market economic system. Is it the source of every social injustice, from exploitation to alienation to inequality, or is it essential to our freedom and democracy? This debate is as relevant today in 2020 as it was in 1920 or 1820."]

Economic Policy Institute ["The Economic Policy Institute, a nonprofit Washington D.C. think tank, was created in 1986 to broaden the discussion about economic policy to include the interests of low- and middle-income workers. Today, with global competition expanding, wage inequality rising, and the methods and nature of work changing in fundamental ways, it is as crucial as ever that people who work for a living have a voice in the economic discourse. EPI was the first — and remains the premier — think tank to focus on the economic condition of low- and middle-income Americans and their families. Its careful research on the status of American workers has become the gold standard in that field. Its encyclopedic State of Working America, issued every two years since 1988, is stocked in university libraries around the world. EPI researchers, who often testify to Congress and are widely cited in the media, first brought to light the disconnect between pay and productivity that marked the U.S. economy in the 1990s and is now widely recognized as a cause of growing inequality. EPI's staff includes eight Ph.D.-level researchers, a half dozen policy analysts and research assistants, and a full communications and outreach staff. EPI also works closely with a national network of prominent scholars. The institute conducts original research according to strict standards of objectivity, and couples its findings with outreach and popular education. Its work spans a wide range of economic issues, such as trends in wages, incomes, and prices; health care; education; retirement security; state-level economic development strategies; trade and global finance; comparative international economic performance; the health of manufacturing and other key sectors; global competitiveness and energy development. Its research is varied, but a common thread runs through it: EPI examines issues through a "living standards" lens by analyzing the impact of policies and initiatives on the American public."]

Ellis, C.P. "Why I Quit the Klan." American Dreams Lost and Found (Interviewed by Studs Terkel: 1980)

The End of Poverty (USA: Philippe Diaz, 2008: 106 mins)

Fields, Karen E. and Barbara J. Fields. Racecraft: The Soul of Inequality in America. Verso, 2012. ["Most people assume that racism grows from a perception of human difference: the fact of race gives rise to the practice of racism. Sociologist Karen E. Fields and historian Barbara J. Fields argue otherwise: the practice of racism produces the illusion of race, through what they call “racecraft.” And this phenomenon is intimately entwined with other forms of inequality in American life. So pervasive are the devices of racecraft in American history, economic doctrine, politics, and everyday thinking that the presence of racecraft itself goes unnoticed. That the promised post-racial age has not dawned, the authors argue, reflects the failure of Americans to develop a legitimate language for thinking about and discussing inequality. That failure should worry everyone who cares about democratic institutions."]

Fisher, Max. "Map: U.S. Ranks Near Bottom on Income Inequality." The Atlantic (September 2011)

Frank, Thomas. "Academy Fight Song." The Baffler #23 (2013)

Fraser, Steve. "Class Dismissed: Class Conflict in Red State America." Counterpunch (April 19, 2018)

Giridharadas, Anand. "'The Billionaire Election': How 2020 Is a Referendum on Wealth Inequality." Democracy Now (February 26, 2020) ["The 10th Democratic presidential debate took place Tuesday in Charleston, South Carolina, and two billionaires were at either end of the stage: Michael Bloomberg and Tom Steyer. Front-runner Bernie Sanders, who has made attacking the power of the “billionaire class” a central theme of his campaign, stood in the middle. It was a visual representation of the split within the Democratic Party, in which a growing number of people are “rising up against plutocracy,” says Anand Giridharadas, editor-at-large at Time magazine and author of “Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World.” His recent piece for The New York Times is titled “The Billionaire Election: Does the world belong to them or to us?"]

---. "How Philanthropy Lets Rich People Off the Hook."
On the Media (April 19, 2019) ["Anand Giridharadas, author of Winners Take All: the Elite Charade of Changing the World, explains that we're living in a century-old bargain between the ultra-wealthy and the rest of society: the rich get rich, and the rest of us get downstream benefits. Giridharadas and Bob talk about the origins of this bargain — and what needs to shift if we hope to see meaningful structural solutions to society's most pressing challenges."]

---. "Purple Episode 3: Let's Not Discount Reality." On the Media (November 25, 2019) ["One of the reasons so many Americans have lost trust and faith is democratic institutions is simple misunderstanding about how the system is designed to work. Another, however, is familiarity with how the system does work— which isn’t exactly of, by and for the People. Anand Giridharadas is author of Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World. He says the founders also didn’t plan on politicians constantly trash-talking government itself and that a decline in trust in government is the result of a concerted, private sector propaganda war waged over the last four decades."]

Gordon, Paul. "Billionaires Score Big Win With McCutcheon Decision." Truthout (April 10, 2014)

Graeber, David. "On the phenomenon of bullshit jobs." libcom (August 20, 2013)

Graves, Lisa and John Nichols. "Billionaires for Austerity: With Cuts Looming, Wall Street Roots of "Fix the Debt" Campaign Exposed." Democracy Now (February 26, 2013)

Greenwald, Robert. "Koch Brothers Exposed: The 1% at its Very Worst." Uprising Radio (March 27, 2012)

Guevara, Marina Walker, Michael Hudson and Gerard Ryle. "Likely Largest Journalism Collaboration In History." The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (April 3, 2013)

Hall, Suzanne, et al. "Is the Gentrification of Our Global Cities Inevitable?" LSE IQ #19 (October 2018) ["In 1964 the sociologist Ruth Glass coined the term ‘gentrification’ to describe the process of London’s working class neighbourhoods being taken over by the middle classes. Modest two-up two down terrace houses were bought cheap, done up and made into expensive residences. Once grand Victorian houses that had fallen on hard times and become lodging houses or homes to multiple families, were restored once again and sub-divided into luxury flats. Soon the working class residents had been squeezed out of the neighbourhood and its character changed completely. Fifty years on and this process continues apace in London and many other cities."]

Hari, Johann. "How Goldman Sachs gambled on starving the world's poor - and won." The Independent (July 2, 2010)

Hart-Landsberg, Marty. "Class, Race and Wealth Inequality." Economic Front (January 3, 2018)

---. "Taxes, Inequality and Class Power." Economic Front (December 22, 2017)

---. "Too Many Whites Are In Denial About The Extent Of Race-Based Economic Inequality." Economic Front (January 19, 2018)

Harvey, David. "Urban Uprisings from Occupy Wall Street to the Paris Commune." Democracy Now (April 30, 2012)

Hedges, Chris. "A Master Class in Occupation." TruthDig (October 31, 2011)

Hedges, Chris, Vandana Shiva and Robert Scheer. "Liberalism, Economy, and Corporate Domination." Uprising Radio (October 22, 2010)

Henry, Marsha. "Reimagining Peacekeeping: Gender, Race, and Militarisation in the Global Order." The London School of Economics and Political Science (September 20, 2017)  ["Marsha Henry argues for reimagining peacekeeping, which starts with a return to critical theories and concepts in order to acknowledge the production of gendered, racial and classed inequalities in peacekeeping spaces and relations. In particular, turning to critical concepts such as standpoint, power geometries and space-time continuum, the colour line, militarised femininities, and intersectionality, the lecture traces the practical and policy dead-ends that arise when peacekeeping studies relies on policy and practice driven objectives, alone.  Marsha Henry is Associate Professor in the Department of Gender Studies and Deputy Director of the Centre for Women, Peace and Security."]

"How U.S. Taxpayers Subsidize the Nation's Wealthiest Family." Jobs with Justice (April 14, 2014)

Jaffe, Sarah. "When There’s a Fee to Get Your Pay." In These Times (June 20, 2013)

Jameison, Dave. "Fast Food CEOs Make 1,000 Times More Than Their Typical Workers: Report." Huffington Post (April 22, 2014)

Jayaraman, Saru and Damani Varnado."Facing Mass Layoffs, Restaurant Workers Living 'Tip to Mouth' Demand Living Wage & Paid Sick Leave." Democracy Now (March 18, 2020) ["Mass shutdowns and layoffs due to the spread of COVID-19 are affecting millions of restaurant workers across the U.S., with bars and restaurants closing for the foreseeable future. Servers, bartenders, kitchen staff and more have been left in the lurch, many without paid sick leave, paid time off or benefits. One study estimated 4 million restaurant workers in the U.S. are at risk of losing their jobs in a matter of weeks. For more on the impacts on service workers, we speak with Saru Jayaraman, the co-founder of the Food Labor Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley, and president of One Fair Wage, which has launched an emergency fund to support workers during this time. We also speak with Damani Varnado, a restaurant worker who has worked in catering, fine dining and cocktailing for the past 20 years in New York City. He was working at the restaurant Tiny’s & The Bar Upstairs when the whole staff was let go during the coronavirus pandemic. The coronavirus outbreak is a “devastating” blow to an industry that had “severe structural inequality problems that existed long before this crisis,” Saru Jayaraman."]

Kempf, Hervé. "Salary Ceiling, A Lever for Change." Truthout (January 3, 2011)

Kendi, Ibram X. "The challenge of antiracist thought to a racist society." This is Hell #1070 (August 24, 2019) ["Historian Ibram X. Kendi discusses racism and antiracism in American society - from the production and maintenance of racist thought to disguise inequity and manipulate the working class, to the promise of an antiracist challenge to the power structures that divide people from each other and a future lived in communion with all people. Ibram is author of How To Be An Antiracist from One World Literature."]

Kimmel, Michael. "Toward a Pedagogy of the Oppressor." Tikkun (November/December 2002)

King, Charles. "How A Few 'Renegade' Thinkers Helped Usher In A New Era Of Anthropology." Fresh Air (August 20, 2019) ["In his new book, Gods of the Upper Air, Charles King tells the story of Franz Boas, Margaret Mead and the other 20th century anthropologists who challenged outdated notions of race, class and gender."]

King, Martin Luther, Jr. "Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam." (Video Excerpts of a Sermon at the Ebenezer Baptist Church on April 30, 1967)

Kroll, Andy. "'The Next Citizens United': McCutcheon Opens Floodgates for 1 Percent to Spend Millions on Campaigns." Democracy Now (April 3, 2014)

Kumanyika, Chenjerai. "Getting Real About the Job of Police: A Letter to Barack Obama." The Intercept (June 3, 2020)

Leary, John Patrick. "'Meritocracy' Doesn't Mean What You Think It Means." On the Media (March 15, 2019) ["This week, fifty people were charged by federal prosecutors in a college admissions scandal. As the public dug into the details of how wealthy parents made payments to help their students get into elite (and not so elite) universities around the country, some of the discussion centered around "the myth of meritocracy" in the United States. The trouble is, the myth of "meritocracy" goes much deeper than this story. The word was actually coined as satire in 1958 by the British sociologist Michael Young, who was criticizing the role that the UK's elite education system had in shaping the hierarchy of British society. This week, Bob speaks with John Patrick Leary about the satirical origins of the word and what it has come to mean in the US. He says there are actually two myths: "the myth that there is such a thing, and the myth that the United States is committed to that imaginary thing." Leary is a professor of English at Wayne State University and author of Keywords: The New Language of Capitalism."]

Lebowitz, Michael A. "The Unifying Element in All Struggles Against Capital Is the Right of Everyone to Full Human Development." Monthly Review (November 1, 2011)

Linebaugh, Peter and Marcus Rediker. The Many Headed Hydra: The Hidden History of the Revolutionary Atlantic. Boston: Beacon Press, 2000.

Liu, Rebecca. "A Hellish Commons: Bong Joon-Ho's Parasite." Another Gaze (February 13, 2020)

Maddow, Rachel. "Benton Harbor's Emergency Financial Manager." Rachel Maddow Show (April 19, 2011)

Maharidge, Dale. "Someplace Like America." University of California Press Blog (May 9, 2011)

Maher, Stephen. "Springsteen’s Wrecking Ball and the Plague of the 99%." Monthly Review (December 1, 2012)

Mayer, Danny. "Let Them Eat Art!: The 21c public/private partnership." North of Center (December 5, 2012)

Mayer, Jane. "Dark Money and the Rise of Conservative Orthodoxy." On the Media (May 31, 2019) ["William Happer, the man tapped to head Trump’s new climate review panel, is not a climate scientist. And yet, in recent years, William Happer has made a mission of attacking climate science, including at events hosted by the right-wing Heritage Foundation. Heritage has long worked to redirect public sentiment and policy-making away from addressing climate change and towards deregulation — which is itself part of an even bigger decades-long goal: the propagation of a conservative ideology that preserves capital for rich people. Jane Mayer, author of Dark Money: The Hidden History of the Billionaires Behind the Rise of the Radical Right, walks Bob through the history of the modern conservative intellectual framework."]

McAlevey, Jane. "It's Time to Retire the Term 'Middle-Class.'" Citations Needed #91 (October 23, 2019) ["The term “middle class” is used so much by pundits and politicians, it could easily be the Free Space in any political rhetoric Bingo card. After all, who’s opposed to strengthening, widening, and protecting the “middle class”? Like “democracy,” “freedom,” and “human rights”, “middle class” is an unimpeachable, unassailable label that evokes warm feelings and a sense of collective morality.
But the term itself, always slippery and changing based on context, has evolved from a vague aspiration marked by safety, a nice home, and a white picket fence into something more sinister, racially-coded, and deliberately obscuring. The middle class isn’t about concrete, material positive rights of good housing and economic security––it’s a capitalist carrot hovering over our heads telling us such things are possible if we Only Work Harder. More than anything, it's a way for politicians to gesture towards populism without the messiness of mentioning––much less centering––the poor and poverty. This week we are joined by Jane McAlevey, a union organizer, scholar and Senior Policy Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley’s Labor Center."]

Moniz, Tomaz. " Notes from the Frontlines of Bringing Up Girls: What I really want to tell my daughters about autonomy and sex, in the midst of a war on women." Yes! (October 3, 2012)

Mosher, Holly and Jonah Minkoff-Zern. "What is At Stake in Supreme Court’s McCutcheon Ruling?" Uprising Radio (March 24, 2014)

Noble, Safiya. "Writing human bias into the code that runs our lives (Algorithms)." Best of the Left #1266 (April 19, 2019) ["Today we take a look at the racism, sexism and classism that is permeating the algorithmic systems that are directing more and more of our online and offline lives."]

Papayanis, Marilyn Adler. "Sex on the Beach: The Yin Yang of Female Sex Tourism in Two Films." Bright Lights Film Journal #78 (November 2012)

Pirsch, Michael. "Class Warfare, the Final Chapter." Truthout (March 15, 2011)

Poenaru, Florin. "To Make Sense of Ukraine, We Need to Bring the Class Back In." LeftEast (February 24, 2014)

Press, Alex N. "A Tale of Two Prisoners." Jacobin (July 27, 2019) ["Comparing the treatment of Jeffrey Epstein to Ramsey Orta, the man who filmed Eric Garner's murder, reveals the grotesque inequality at the heart of American society. There’s one set of rules for the rich, and an entirely different set for the poor."]

Pyle, Christian L. "Adjuncts: The Invisible Majority." North of Center (April 27, 2011)

Quinby, Brian. "Mike Rowe’s Koch-Backed Working Man Affectation." Citations Needed #64 (January 30, 2019) ["In recent years, television personality Mike Rowe has amassed a wildly popular following due to alleged working-class straight talk about topics ranging from the affordability of college to reasserting a culture of pride in craftsmanship and labor. From his 5.2 million Facebook followers to his cable programs, his everyman schtick, on its surface, can be very appealing: after all, who doesn’t love a hard day’s work and loathe detached, ivory tower eggheads? But hiding under his superficially appealing blue-collar façade is dangerous ideology, one funded by the Koch Brothers and other far-right, anti-labor corporate interests and specifically tailored to pick off a certain constituency of Home Depot Democrats while pushing political impotence, anti-union narratives and anti-intellectualism. Through a clever combination of working class affectation and folksy charm – often exploiting real fears about a decline in industrialization – Rowe has cultivated an image that claims to be pro-worker, but primarily exists to line the pockets of their boss."]

Requiem for the American Dream (USA: Peter Hutchison, Kelly Nyks and Jared Scott, 2015: 72 mins) ["In Requiem for the American Dream, renowned intellectual figure Noam Chomsky deliberates on the defining characteristics of our time—the colossal concentration of wealth and power in the hands of the few and fewer, with the rise of a rapacious individualism and complete collapse of class consciousness. Chomsky does this by discussing some of the key principles that have brought this culture to the pinnacle of historically unprecedented inequality by tracing a half century of policies designed to favour the most wealthy at the expense of the majority, while also looking back on his own life of activism and political participation. The film serves to provide insights into how we got here, and culminates as a reminder that these problems are not inevitable. Once we remember those who came before and those who will come after, we see that we can, and should, fight back."]

Resnick, Stephen. "Econ 305: Marxian Economics." (38 video lectures: 2011)

Revoyr, Nina. "The Invisible Aristocracy." Against the Grain (April 1, 2019) ["Class divides and racial dynamics are explored in Nina Revoyr’s new novel “A Student of History.” In it, a biracial graduate student with a blue-collar background gains access to a very different world, that of the superrich descendants of the founders of Los Angeles. Many of them, he discovers, exert tremendous power and influence behind the scenes."]

Ritter, Scott, John Stauber, Pepi Leistyna, Loretta Alper, and Tom Scott. "Stupefying the Group Mind (Managing the Class War with PR and TV)." Unwelcome Guests #301 (April 8, 2006)

Robinson, Andrew. "Bakhtin: Carnival against Capital, Carnival against Power." Cease Fire (September 9, 2011) ["The dominant worldview of medieval Europe was of a natural order which is hierarchical, stable, monolithic and immutable, but poised on the brink of disaster or ‘cosmic terror’, and hence in need of constant maintenance of order. This is similar to Aristotle’s view. For Bakhtin, such a view is oppressive and intolerant. It closes language to change. The fear of ‘cosmic terror’, the pending collapse of order if things got out of control (or the threat posed by the Real to the master-signifier), was used by elites to justify hierarchy and to subdue popular revolt and critical consciousness. Today, we might think of this vision of monolithic order in terms of fantasies of ‘broken Britain’, of civilisation under siege from extremists, and a discourse of risk-management (and the crisis-management of ‘ungovernability’) in which ‘terrorism’, disease, protest, deviance and natural disaster fuse into a secularised vision of cosmic collapse. This vision of collapse has infiltrated legal and political discourse to such a degree that any excess of state power seems ‘proportionate’ against this greater evil. The folk view expressed in carnival and carnivalesque, and related speech-genres such as swearing and popular humour, opposes and subverts this vision. For Bakhtin, cosmic terror and the awe induced by the system’s violent power are the mainstays of its affective domination. Folk culture combats the fear created by cosmic terror.""]

Roy, Arundhati. "Capitalism: A Ghost Story" We Are Many (March 26, 2014 at The New School in NYC) ["From the poisoned rivers, barren wells, and clear-cut forests, to the hundreds of thousands of farmers who have committed suicide to escape punishing debt, to the hundreds of millions of people who live on less than two dollars a day, there are ghosts nearly everywhere you look in India. India is a nation of 1.2 billion, but the country’s 100 richest people own assets equivalent to one-fourth of India’s gross domestic product. Capitalism: A Ghost Story examines the dark side of democracy in contemporary India, and shows how the demands of globalized capitalism has subjugated billions of people to the highest and most intense forms of racism and exploitation."]

---. "Is India on a Totalitarian Path? Arundhati Roy on Corporatism, Nationalism and World’s Largest Vote." Democracy Now (April 9, 2014)

Rushkoff, Douglas. "Survival of the Richest: The Wealthy are Plotting to Leave Us Behind." One Zero (July 5, 2018)

Sanders, Bernie. "Supreme Court Undermines Democracy by Allowing Billionaires to "Buy Elections." Democracy Now (April 3, 2014)

"The Scarlet E: Unmasking America's Eviction Crisis." On the Media (June 6, 2019) ["We have an eviction epidemic in this country. We’ve had one for a long time. And in this new four-part series from On the Media, host Brooke Gladstone will seek out the why and the wherefore — in search, ultimately, of a cure. Evictions are filed over 3.7 million times a year in America — or at a rate of one every seven seconds. The eviction epidemic has bedeviled more lives than the opioid crisis and still its causes — and consequences — remain largely ignored or misunderstood. With the help of Matt Desmond and the Eviction Lab, which has compiled the largest-ever database of eviction records, our series charts a course through a thicket of contradictions and assumptions to reveal the heart of the crisis."]

Schuman, Michael. "Marx’s Revenge: How Class Struggle Is Shaping the World." Time (March 25, 2013)

Schwalbe, Michael. "A Primer on Class Struggle." Common Dreams (March 31, 2011)

Scott, Peter Dale. "The Processes and Logic of The Deep State (The American Deep State by Peter Dale Scott)." Unwelcome Guests #719 (August 8, 2015) ["Unusually, just a single speaker this week: one two hour interview with the doyen of deep political research, Canadian Professor Peter Dale Scott. He provides not only a lot of details of the evolution of the post WW2 deep state in the USA, but also sketches out its guiding principles, some of the deeper patterns which allow one to understand the superficially confusing and contradictory actions of the US deep state."]

Shaw, John. "The problem of the poor: faith, science and poverty in 19th century Britain." The National Archives Podcast Series (September 28, 2006)

Shah, Kushbu. "They Look White But Say They are Black: A Tiny Town in Ohio Wrestles with Race." The Guardian (July 25, 2019) [A clear example of how racism is much more than just skin color (although that is an obvious and easy way for immediate enforcement), that who is considered to be "white"/"non-white" has evolved over time, and racism has always had a strong economic/class (hierarchy) function designed to keep certain peoples in their "place.". Check out Barbara Field's book  Racecraft: The Soul of Inequality "Many residents in East Jackson were raised to identify as black. But what dictates race: where you live, your DNA, the history you’re taught?"]

Stiglitz, Joseph. "How Intellectual Property Reinforces Inequality." Opinionator (July 14, 2013)

---. "Of the 1%, by the 1%, for the 1%." Vanity Fair (May 2011)

---. On The Price of Inequality: How Today’s Divided Society Endangers Our Future; On Occupy Wall Street & Why U.S.-Europe Austerity Will Only Weaken Economic Recovery; On Ways to Lessen Inequality in the United States." Democracy Now (June 6, 2012)

Tabb, William K. "The Crisis: A View From Occupied America." The Monthly Review 64.4 (September 2012)

Taibbi, Matt. "The Real Housewives of Wall Street." Rolling Stone (April 11, 2011)

---. "Who Goes to Jail? Matt Taibbi on American Injustice Gap from Wall Street to Main Street." Democracy Now (April 15, 2014)

---. "Why Isn't Wall Street in Jail? Financial crooks brought down the world's economy — but the feds are doing more to protect them than to prosecute them." Rolling Stone (February 16, 2011)

"Taxday 2011: Where did your 2010 Federal Income Taxes Go? National Priorities Project (March 22, 2011)

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