Wednesday, January 19, 2022

Park Chan-Wook (Ongoing Archive)

Joint Security Area (2000)

Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance (2002)

Oldboy (2003) - Available as a dvd in BCTC Newtown Library

Lady Vengeance (2005)

I'm a Cyborg, but That's O.K. (2006)

Thirst (2009)

Stoker (2013)

The Handmaiden (2016)

The Little Drummer Girl (2018)


The Handmaiden (South Korea: Park Chan-Wook, 2016)





The Handmaiden (South Korea: Park Chan-Wook, 2016: 144 mins)

Anderson, Jake. "The Handmaiden." Letterboxd (December 29, 2018)

Andrews, Charlotte Richardson. "The Handmaiden." Another Gaze (May 19, 2017)

Cassidy, Brendan, J.D Duran and Vince Leo.  "The HandmaidenHacksaw Ridge." InSession Film (November 12, 2016)

Dargis, Manohla. "The Handmaiden Explores Confinement in Rich, Erotic Textures." The New York Times (October 20, 2016)

Hancock, James and Kyle Reardon. "In Praise of Park Chan-wook." Wrong Reel #227 (January 2017)

Raymond, Marc. "From Old Boys to Quiet Dreams: Mapping Korean Art Cinema Today." Film Criticism 42.1 (March 2018) ["This essay theorizes Korean art cinema today through an analysis of domestic festivals (especially Busan, Jeonju, and Bucheon), major festivals abroad (particularly Cannes, Berlin, and Toronto), and various other institutions in order to provide a comprehensive mapping of how art cinema within Korea currently operates. Using sociological theories of taste pioneered by Pierre Bourdieu, the paper shows how the dominant name auteurs of Korea, particularly Park Chan-wook and Lee Chang-dong, were established through international festivals, beginning in the 1990s but exploding in the 2000s, at the same time as Korean films began to compete with and surpass Hollywood films at the local box office. These filmmakers were shaped by the changing ideas of art cinema globally, as theorized by scholars such as David Andrews, and the dominance of these figures thus helped shape the domestic festivals, with younger Korean directors often following within these traditions. The rise of the domestic box office helped create an independent cinema within the country, not unlike the emergence of indie cinema in the United States during the blockbuster era, which had the consequence of both increasing opportunities for young directors while often pigeon-holing them into narrow niches."]

Rebhandl, Bert. "Breaking the Mould: The lead in The Handmaiden, Kim Min-hee is proving to be the most interesting Korean actor for some time." Frieze (April 13, 2017)

Shin, Chi-Yun. "In another time and place: The Handmaiden as an adaptation." The Journal of Japanese and Korean Cinema 11.1 (2019): 1-13.

Tolentino, Jia. "The Handmaiden and the Freedom Women Find Only with One Another." The New Yorker (October 29, 2016)

Wong, Claire L. "The Power of Perspective in ‘The Handmaiden’, A Masterclass in Storytelling Technique." Hollywood Insider (February 25, 2021)




















ENG 102 Books (2022)

May, Katherine and Michael Pollan. "The Future of Hope 4." On Being (January 20, 2022) ["Michael Pollan is one of our most revelatory explorers of the interaction between the human and natural worlds — especially the plants with which we have, as he says, co-evolved — from food to caffeine to psychedelics. In this episode of our series, The Future of Hope, Wintering’s Katherine May draws him out on the burgeoning human inquiry and science to which he’s now given himself over — the transformative applications of altered states for healing trauma and depression, for end-of-life care — and the thrilling matter of grasping what consciousness is for. This is an informative, intriguing, utterly uncategorizable conversation." Michael Pollan's recent books: How to Change Your Mind: What the New Science of Psychedelics Teaches Us About Consciousness, Dying, Addiction, Depression, and Transcendence and This is Your Mind on Plants]

Prasad, Vinay. "The Cult of Masked Schoolchildren." Tablet (January 19, 2022) ["History will not look kindly on our evidence-free decision to make kids suffer most." Vinay Prasad is a hematologist-oncologist, associate professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of California, San Francisco, and author of Malignant: How Bad Policy and Bad Evidence Harm People with Cancer.]

Taylor, Steven. "What Is a Pandemic?" The Psychology of Pandemics: Preparing for the Next Global Outbreak of Infectious Disease. Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2019: excerpt of pages 1 - 10. [Book description: "Pandemics are large-scale epidemics that spread throughout world. Virologists predict that the next pandemic could occur in the coming years, probably from some form of influenza, with potentially devastating consequences. Vaccinations, if available, and behavioral methods are vital for stemming the spread of infection. However, remarkably little attention has been devoted to the psychological factors that influence the spread of pandemic infection and the associated emotional distress and social disruption. Psychological factors are important for many reasons. They play a role in nonadherence to vaccination and hygiene programs, and play an important role in how people cope with the threat of infection and associated losses. Psychological factors are important for understanding and managing societal problems associated with pandemics, such as the spreading of excessive fear, stigmatization, and xenophobia that occur when people are threatened with infection. This book offers the first comprehensive analysis of the psychology of pandemics. It describes the psychological reactions to pandemics, including maladaptive behaviors, emotions, and defensive reactions, and reviews the psychological vulnerability factors that contribute to the spreading of disease and distress. It also considers empirically supported methods for addressing these problems, and outlines the implications for public health planning."]

Wengrow, David. "The Dawn of Everything, Part 1." Against the Grain (November 15, 2021) ["Egalitarianism is a thing of our distant past, or so we learn from conventional history. After a long stretch as hunter-gatherers roaming in small bands, our societies became bigger and more complex. And as they became larger, and cities emerged, hierarchy was inevitable in the form of kings, priests, and bureaucrats. The late anthropologist and anarchist David Graeber and the archeologist David Wengrow, however, argue that’s all wrong. In a more hopeful reading of the past, they contend that small-scale societies have often been hierarchical and large-scale societies more egalitarian." Graeber's and Wengrow's book The Dawn of Everything: A New History of Humanity.]

Saturday, January 15, 2022

Lady Vengeance (South Korea: Chan-Wook Park, 2005)

 


Lady Vengeance (South Korea: Chan-Wook Park, 2005: 112 mins)

Benton, Michael. "Violence and Film: Audience-Experience as a Factor in Our Reception of a Film." Dialogic (January 10, 2007)

Buruma, Ian. "Mr Vengeance." The New York Times (April 9, 2006)

Castillo, Elaine. "Last Words: Park Chan-wook, Sympathy for Lady Vengeance." Pank (December 3, 2010)

Castle, Robert. "Disturbing Movies or, the Flip Side of the Real: Disturbing movies shouldn't equivocate." Bright Lights Film Journal #44 (May 2004)

Ebert, Roger. "Evil in film: To what end?" Chicago Sun-Times (August 19, 2005)

Grossman, Andrew. "Bleeding Realism Dry or How to Turn One's Back on a Tyrant: The cripplingly small-minded art of verisimilitude becomes crippled by its own technology." Bright Lights Film Journal #37 (August 2002)

Hancock, James and Kyle Reardon. "In Praise of Park Chan-wook." Wrong Reel #227 (January 2017)

Isaacs, Bruce. "Non-Linear Narrative." New Punk Cinema ed. Nicholas Rombes. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2005: 126-138. (In BCTC library)

Kim, Se Young. "A Sociohistorical Contextual Analysis of the Use of Violence in Park Chan-wook's Vengeance Trilogy." (A thesis presented to the faculty of the College of Fine Arts of Ohio University: June 2010)

László, Tarnay. "On the Metaphysics of Screen Violence and Beyond." Apertura (2008)

Lin, Ed. "This Side of Parasite: New Korean Cinema 1998–2009." The Current (November 2, 2020)

Ng, Natalie. "The Women of Park Chan-Wook." Filmed In Ether (July 19, 2016)

Radford, Kristina. "ENG 282 Response to Lady Vengeance." Dialogic (October 12, 2010)

Raymond, Marc. "From Old Boys to Quiet Dreams: Mapping Korean Art Cinema Today." Film Criticism 42.1 (March 2018) ["This essay theorizes Korean art cinema today through an analysis of domestic festivals (especially Busan, Jeonju, and Bucheon), major festivals abroad (particularly Cannes, Berlin, and Toronto), and various other institutions in order to provide a comprehensive mapping of how art cinema within Korea currently operates. Using sociological theories of taste pioneered by Pierre Bourdieu, the paper shows how the dominant name auteurs of Korea, particularly Park Chan-wook and Lee Chang-dong, were established through international festivals, beginning in the 1990s but exploding in the 2000s, at the same time as Korean films began to compete with and surpass Hollywood films at the local box office. These filmmakers were shaped by the changing ideas of art cinema globally, as theorized by scholars such as David Andrews, and the dominance of these figures thus helped shape the domestic festivals, with younger Korean directors often following within these traditions. The rise of the domestic box office helped create an independent cinema within the country, not unlike the emergence of indie cinema in the United States during the blockbuster era, which had the consequence of both increasing opportunities for young directors while often pigeon-holing them into narrow niches."]

Sepytyte, Agne. "Sympathy for Lady Vengeance." The Asian Cinema Blog (December 4, 2013)

Smith, Damon. "Acts of Revenge: Director Park Chan-wook Discusses Lady Vengeance and More." Bright Lights Film Journal (August 1, 2006)

Tafoya, Scout. "The Post-Punk Cinema Manifesto, Part 1." (Posted on Vimeo: 2017)

---. "The Post-Punk Cinema Manifesto, Part 2." (Posted on Vimeo: 2017)




Thursday, January 13, 2022

Oldboy (South Korea: Chan-Wook Park, 2003)

 


Oldboy (South Korea: Chan-Wook Park, 2003: 120 mins)

Bao, Nguyen Hoang. "Oldboy (2003) and South Korea in late 90s to early 2000s." Medium (August 27, 2019) 

Benton, Michael Dean. "Violence and Film; Audience-Experience as a Factor in Our Reception of a Film." Dialogic (January 7, 2007)

Campbell, Kambole. "Six of the best Park Chan-wook scenes." Little White Lies (April 11, 2017)

Choe, Steve. "Love Your Enemies: Revenge and Forgiveness in Films by Park Chan-wook." Korean Studies 33.1 (2009): 29-51.

Choi, Jinnhee and Mitsuyo Wada-Marciano, eds. Horror to the Extreme: Changing Boundaries in Asian cinema. Hong Kong University, 2009.

Ebert, Roger. "Korea's 'Oldboy' digs deeper than average mystery/thriller." Chicago Sun-Times (March 5, 2004)

Eggert, Brian. "Oldboy (2003)." Deep Focus Review (March 23, 2009)

Eig, Jonathan. "A Beautiful Mind(fuck) -- Hollywood Structures of Identity." Jump Cut #46 (2003)

Elsaesser, Thomas. "The Mind-Game Films." Puzzle Films: Complex Storytelling in Contemporary Cinema ed. Warren Buckland. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2009: 13-41.

Hancock, James and Kyle Reardon. "In Praise of Park Chan-wook." Wrong Reel #227 (January 2017)

Kaklamanidou, Betty. "Genre: Oldboy and the Suspense Thriller." Offscreen (July 31, 2007)

Kim, Se Young. "A Sociohistorical Contextual Analysis of the Use of Violence in Park Chan-wook's Vengeance Trilogy." (A thesis presented to the faculty of the College of Fine Arts of Ohio University: June 2010)

Kotzathanasis, Panos. "Film Analysis: Oldboy (2003) by Park Chan-wook." Asian Movie Pulse (April 4, 2021)

McSweeney, Terence and Amresh Sinha. Millenial Cinema Memory in Global Film. Columbia University Press, 2012.

Lee, Hwanhee. "What is Morality? On Oldboy." Offscreen (July 31, 2008)

Thanouli, Eleftheria. "Looking for Access in Narrative Complexity: The New and the Old in Oldboy." Puzzle Films: Complex Storytelling in Contemporary Cinema. ed. Warren Buckland. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009: 217-232. [BCTC Library: PN1995 P89 2009]

Vick, Tom. "The Smithsonian's Curator of Asian Film on Where Spike Lee's Oldboy Fails." The Smithsonian (December 5, 2013)

White, Jarrod. "CM #1: Oldboy (2003)." Filmstatic (May 5, 2013)




















Joint Security Area (South Korea: Chan-wook Park, 2000)

 





Joint Security Area (South Korea: Chan-wook Park, 2000: 110 mins)

Hancock, James and Kyle Reardon. "In Praise of Park Chan-wook." Wrong Reel #227 (January 2017)

Lin, Ed. "This Side of Parasite: New Korean Cinema 1998–2009." The Current (November 2, 2020)

Raymond, Marc. "From Old Boys to Quiet Dreams: Mapping Korean Art Cinema Today." Film Criticism 42.1 (March 2018) ["This essay theorizes Korean art cinema today through an analysis of domestic festivals (especially Busan, Jeonju, and Bucheon), major festivals abroad (particularly Cannes, Berlin, and Toronto), and various other institutions in order to provide a comprehensive mapping of how art cinema within Korea currently operates. Using sociological theories of taste pioneered by Pierre Bourdieu, the paper shows how the dominant name auteurs of Korea, particularly Park Chan-wook and Lee Chang-dong, were established through international festivals, beginning in the 1990s but exploding in the 2000s, at the same time as Korean films began to compete with and surpass Hollywood films at the local box office. These filmmakers were shaped by the changing ideas of art cinema globally, as theorized by scholars such as David Andrews, and the dominance of these figures thus helped shape the domestic festivals, with younger Korean directors often following within these traditions. The rise of the domestic box office helped create an independent cinema within the country, not unlike the emergence of indie cinema in the United States during the blockbuster era, which had the consequence of both increasing opportunities for young directors while often pigeon-holing them into narrow niches."]



Tuesday, January 11, 2022

Paul Thomas Anderson (Ongoing Archive)

Hard Eight (1996)

Boogie Nights (1997)

Magnolia (1999)

Punch Drunk Love (2002)

There Will Be Blood (2007)

The Master (2012)

Inherent Vice (2014)

Phantom Thread (2017) 

Licorice Pizza (2021)

Licorice Pizza (USA: Paul Thomas Anderson, 2021)





 Licorice Pizza (USA: Paul Thomas Anderson, 2021: 133 mins)



Dargis, Manohla. "Licorice Pizza: California Dreaming and Scheming." The New York Times (November 25, 2021)



Hudson, David. "Paul Thomas Anderson's Licorice Pizza." The Current (December 1, 2021)

Jenkins, David. "Licorice Pizza." Little White Lies (January 4, 2022)



Lemire, Christy. "Licorice Pizza." Roger Ebert (December 24, 2021) 



























Friday, January 7, 2022

Phantom Thread (UK/USA: Paul Thomas Anderson, 2017)





Phantom Thread (UK/USA: Paul Thomas Anderson, 2017: 130 mins)

Bishop, Bryan. "Phantom Thread’s Oscar-winning costume designer on how to tell stories with couture." The Verge (March 4, 2018)

Boyer, Lanny. "Paul Thomas Anderson: Four Basics." (Posted on Youtube: October 19, 2015)

Collins, Austin C. "Nothing Is Quite As It Seems in Phantom Thread." The Ringer (December 20, 2017)

"Fact v Fiction: What Phantom Thread gets right and wrong." BBC (March 6, 2018)

Hemon, Aleksandar. "Why Phantom Thread is Propaganda for Toxic Masculinity." The New Yorker (April 8, 2018)

Koski, Genevieve, et al. "Phantom Thread/Rebecca (1940) - Part 1." The Next Picture Show #112 (January 23, 2018) ["Paul Thomas Anderson has made it clear that his new PHANTOM THREAD is a purposeful riff on Alfred Hitchcock’s 1940 Best Picture winner REBECCA, inspiring us to return to Manderley for a reflection on the film that brought Hitchcock to Hollywood (and to producer David O. Selznick, whom he famously clashed with). We talk over what REBECCA gained and lost from being produced under the Hays Code, what it signaled for Hitchcock’s career going forward, and what to make of the two big relationships (or would-be love triangle) at its center."]

---. "Phantom Thread/Rebecca (1940) - Part 2." The Next Picture Show #113 (January 25, 2018) ["With PHANTOM THREAD, Paul Thomas Anderson has repurposed REBECCA to his own ends, telling a personal story that’s unique from the original yet still resonates with echoes of Hitchcock’s gothic romance. We tug at the many threads Anderson has woven throughout his film, before diving into what unites it with REBECCA, from the two films’ character analogs to their complementary relationships with food. "]

Lane, Anthony. "The Claustrophobic Elegance of Phantom Thread."  The New Yorker (December 25, 2017)

Lucca, Violet and Sheila O'Malley. "The Phantom Thread." Film Comment Podcast (January 9, 2018) ["“In Paul Thomas Anderson’s work, love can be—quite literally—a miracle,” writes Sheila O’Malley in her January/February 2018 Film Comment cover story, “Love, After a Fashion.” “People are scarred by life, their emotional resilience decimated by disappointments and neglect. But sometimes love is offered and, as Blanche DuBois says, famously, in A Streetcar Named Desire: ‘Sometimes—there’s God—so quickly!’ That’s the redemptive romantic journey of Phantom Thread, where Reynolds says to Alma at one point that she may very well keep his ‘sour heart from choking.’” Of course, Phantom Thread is no familiar story of redemption through romance. O’Malley joins FC Digital Producer Violet Lucca on this week’s Film Comment Podcast to discuss its beguiling, and even radical, twist on a love story."]

Podcasts/Videocasts



Blank Check (Latest)

Breaking Points (Latest)

Capitalisnt (Latest)



Craphound (Latest)

Creative Codex (Latest)

Democracy Now (Latest)

Sifting

The Dig (Latest)

Director's Club (147)

Entitled (Latest)

Entitled Opinions (November 29, 2005)

The Evolution of Horror (Ghosts 3 - August 26, 2021; Latest)

The Experiment (Latest)


Faculty of Horror (November, 2019 - August 25, 2021; Latest)

Film Comment (March 13, 2019 - October 5, 2021; Latest)

The Final Girls (November 15, 2019 - April 9, 2021; Latest)

Flawless (13)

Fun City Cinema (July 31, 2020)



Huberman Lab (3 ; Latest)




Know Your Enemy (Latest)

Lannan Podcasts (October 30, 2019 - October 20, 2020; Iphone)


Love That Album (Latest)



Mindscapes (Latest)



Narcotica (Latest)

On Being (Latest)

Open Source (Latest)

The Outer Dark (latest)

Philosophize This (15; Latest)



Projections (May 1, 2019)

See Hear (Latest)

Seventh Row (Latest)

Sherds (11)




Team Human (Latest)

Think About It (Latest)



Weird Studies (9; Latest)














Thursday, January 6, 2022

Inherent Vice (USA: Paul Thomas Anderson, 2014)

 



Inherent Vice (USA: Paul Thomas Anderson, 2014: 148 mins)

Bernstein, Arielle and Nelson Carvajal. "The Inherent Vice in Paul Thomas Anderson's Films: A Video Essay." Press Play (January 2, 2015)

Brody, Richard. "Paul Thomas Anderson's Nostalgia Trip." The New Yorker (January 9, 2015)

Donelan, Loretta. "New Inherent Vice Trailer Is Painfully ‘70s, But How Does It Stack Up to Other Trailers From That Decade? — VIDEO." Bustle (January 9, 2015)

Jack's Movie Reviews. "Paul Thomas Anderson - Finding a Purpose In Life." (Posted on Youtube: March 11, 2017)

Jones, Kent. "What’s Up, Doc?" Film Comment (November/December 2014) ["The dream horizons and phantom vibes of 1970 California are brought tangibly close in Paul Thomas Anderson’s spaced-out private investigation."]

Knudsen, Tyler. "What I learned (about filmmaking) from watching Inherent Vice." (Posted on Youtube: December 10, 2014)

Lane, Anthony. "Swinging Seventies: Inherent Vice." The New Yorker (December 15, 2014)

Lee, Kevin B. "The Career of Paul Thomas Anderson in Five Shots." (Posted on Vimeo: 2013)

Morgan, Kim. "Inherent Vice." The New Beverly Cinema (May 16, 2017)

"Paul Thomas Anderson." The Close Up #1 (November 2014)

Ratcliff, Travis Lee. "The Legacy of Paranoid Thrillers." (Posted on Vimeo: June 2017) ["Paranoid thrillers are constant in cinema's history, but at any given moment they reflect our specific anxieties back to us and reveal how we feel about our institutions. Here, I explore how paranoid thrillers crystalized as a genre in American cinema and examine the possibility of a contemporary renaissance in conspiracy fiction."]

Ratzlaff, Jeremy. "Paul Thomas Anderson: A Chronological Timeline." (Posted on Vimeo: November 2015)

Sabo, Lee Weston. "Peace Out and Fuck You: Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice." Bright Lights Film Journal (January 20, 2015)































The Directors Series - Paul Thomas Anderson [Part 4] from FilmFrontier on Vimeo.




The Directors Series- Paul Thomas Anderson [Part 5] from FilmFrontier on Vimeo.