Friday, May 20, 2022

Wednesday, May 18, 2022

Walt Whitman - "Do I contradict myself?"

"Do I contradict myself?
Very well then I contradict myself,
(I am large, I contain multitudes.)"
Walt Whitman, "Song of Myself, 51" (1892 version) 

Tuesday, May 17, 2022

On the "loneliness epidemic" in America

In thinking about the dangers of our current "loneliness" epidemic in America, we must consider that loneliness is not actually a state of being alone (hiking in a forest, reading a book, working on a project), it is instead a continuous state/sense of detachment or isolation in the midst of others or a community. This is important to consider when reflecting on violent terror enacted by the mass shooter in Buffalo this past week (and countless others from various ideological perspectives), but also in regards to the blind allegiance to our party lines or identity allegiances in which all that matters is that "our" team wins, even if it destroys our lives/community/country/world. Arendt uses the word "totalitarianism," but I find, for this moment, that "authoritarianism" is a more useful word. In the desperation of their loneliness people cede the ability to think (and act) to a governing force and silence the important ongoing dialogue within themselves, driving out any considerations of contradictions or recognition of the plurality of the world. This is a high price to pay for the false promise of peace of mind.

Responding to Samantha Rose Hill's "Where Loneliness Can Lead." Aeon (October 16, 2020) and current events.

Saturday, May 14, 2022

Zadie Smith: "I've always been aware of being an inconsistent personality"

 I’ve always been aware of being an inconsistent personality. Of having a lot of contradictory voices knocking around my head. As a kid, I was ashamed of it. Other people seemed to feel strongly about themselves, to know exactly who they were. I was never like that. I could never shake the suspicion that everything about me was the consequence of a series of improbable accidents—not least of which was the 400 trillion–to-one accident of my birth. As I saw it, even my strongest feelings and convictions might easily be otherwise, had I been the child of the next family down the hall, or the child of another century, another country, another God. My mind wandered.

...

Or maybe it's better to say: I've never believed myself to have a voice entirely separate from the many voices I hear, read, and internalize every day. - Zadie Smith. "Fascinated to Presume: In Defense of Fiction." The New York Review of Books (October 24, 2019): 4.

Friday, May 13, 2022

Thomas Jefferson: "I am not a Federalist ..."

I am not a Federalist, because I never submitted the whole system of my opinions to the creed of any party of men whatever in religion, in philosophy, in politics, or in any thing else where I was capable of thinking for myself. Such an addiction is the last degradation of a free and moral agent. If I could not go to heaven but with a party, I would not go there at all. Therefore I protest to you I am not of the party of federalists. But I am much farther from that of the Antifederalists. I approved from the first moment, of the great mass of what is in the new constitution, the consolidation of the government, the organisation into Executive, legislative and judiciary, the subdivision of the legislative, the happy compromise of interests between the great and little states by the different manner of voting in the different houses, the voting by persons instead of states, the qualified negative on laws given to the Executive which however I should have liked better if associated with the judiciary also as in New York, and the power of taxation. I thought at first that the latter might have been limited. A little reflection soon convinced me it ought not to be. What I disapproved from the first moment also was the want of a bill of rights to guard liberty against the legislative as well as executive branches of the government, that is to say to secure freedom in religion, freedom of the press, freedom from monopolies, freedom from unlawful imprisonment, freedom from a permanent military, and a trial by jury in all cases determinable by the laws of the land. I disapproved also the perpetual reeligibility of the President. To these points of disapprobation I adhere. - Thomas Jefferson, “From Thomas Jefferson to Francis Hopkinson, 13 March 1789,” Founders Online, National Archives 

Thursday, May 12, 2022

Hannah Arendt: "Thinking without a banister"

 There's this other thing, which Draenos brought up ... "groundless thinking." I have a metaphor which is not quite that cruel, and which I have never published but kept for myself. I call it thinking without a banister--in German, Denken ohne Geländer. That is, as you go up and down the stairs you can always hang on to the banister so that you don't fall down, but we have lost the banister. That is the way I tell it to myself. And this is indeed what I try to do. - Arendt, Hannah. Thinking Without a Banister: Essays in Understanding 1953 - 1975. ed. Jerome Kohn. Schocken Books, 2018: v. 

Ruth Ozeki "Is it odd to see a book within a book?"

Is it odd to see a book within a book? It shouldn't be. Books like each other. We understand each other. You could even say we are all related, enjoying a kinship that stretches like a rhizomatic network beneath human consciousness and knits the world of thought together. Think of us as a mycelium, a vast subconscious fungal mat beneath a forest floor, and each book a fruiting body. Like mushrooms, we are a collectivity. Our pronouns are we, our, us.

Because we're all connected, we communicate all the time - agreeing, disagreeing, gossiping about other books, name-dropping, and quoting each other - and we have our preferences and prejudices, too. Of course, we do! Biases abound on library shelves. The scholarly tomes disparage the more commercial books. Literary novels look down on romance and pulp fiction, and there's almost a universal disregard for certain genres, like self-help.

Ozeki, Ruth. The Book of Form and Emptiness. Viking, 2021: 94.

Wednesday, May 11, 2022

Run Lola Run (Germany: Tom Tykwer, 1998)






EVERY SECOND OF EVERY DAY YOU’RE FACED WITH A DECISION THAT CAN CHANGE YOUR LIFE. Lola receives a phone call from her boyfriend Manni. He lost 100,000 DM in a subway train that belongs to a very bad guy. She has 20 minutes to raise this amount and meet Manni. Otherwise, he will rob a store to get the money. Three different alternatives may happen depending on some minor event along Lola’s run.

 

 Run Lola Run (Germany: Tom Tykwer, 1998: 80 mins)

Brockmann, Stephen. "Lola rennt (1998) or Cool Germania." A Critical History of German Film Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2010: 456-467. [Professor has copy of the book]


Koski, Genevieve, et al. "No Time to Dye, Pt. 1 — Run Lola Run." The Next Picture Show #318 (March 1, 2022) ["Steven Soderbergh’s new straight-to-streaming movie KIMI wears its many influences on its sleeve, but we saw our inspiration for this week’s pairing in its protagonist’s colorful dyed hair, reminiscent of one of the many eye-popping elements of Tom Tykwer’s 1998 international breakout RUN LOLA RUN. But what really links the two films is the breakneck pace they share as they chase after women trying to achieve an urgent goal on a short deadline. This week we home in on RUN LOLA RUN to parse its interplay of style and substance, and debate how and to what extent this fleet film stumbles over its weighty themes of time, choice, and fate."]

---. "No Time to Dye, Pt. 2 — Kimi." The Next Picture Show #319 (March 8, 2022) ["Steven Soderbergh’s new thriller KIMI is as brisk, stylish, and sure-footed in its approach as Tom Tykwer’s 1998 arthouse hit RUN LOLA RUN, but with a much different set of cinematic goals and references in play. Does KIMI’s spare, simple, stylish approach alchemize into what one of our panelists calls “pure entertainment” that’s “easy as breathing,” or does it leave too many unfilled spaces and narrative holes to trip over? We hash it out before bringing LOLA in to compare the two films’ commitment to brevity and adrenalized filmmaking, how that commitment plays out via their respective soundtracks, and the ways in which each tackles conflict and codependency in relationships."]

Kosta, Barbara. "Tom Tykwer's Run Lola Run and the Usual Suspects: The Avant-Garde, Popular Culture, and History." German Pop Culture: How American Is It? ed. Agnes C. Mueller. University of Michigan Press, 2007: 165-179.






Head-On (Germany/Turkey: Fatih Akin, 2004)




The volatile German-Turkish drama Head-On (Gegen die Wand, 2003/2004), the fourth feature by the Hamburg born writer-director Fatih Akin, snapped up the Golden Bear at the 2004 Berlin Film Festival and riveted audiences the world over with its tempestuous portrait of lovers torn apart by cultural differences, hard living and psychological illness both real and imagined. Cahit (Birol Unel), a rough hewn German prone to bouts of drinking, fighting, and womanizing, meets Sibel (Sibel Kikelli), a delicate Turkish refugee. In a Hamburg psychiatric ward after suicide attempts. His is real, hers is faked, to escape a marriage arranged by her devout Muslim family. Sibel begs Cahit to marry her to win back her family's esteem; Cahit agrees, believing the sham marriage will repair his wrecked life. The couple share an apartment and little else - he's a slob with a temper; she's a demure neat freak with a heart of gold. When they find themselves falling in love, it's with the brute force of a sucker punch to the gut. Akin employs dark comedy and tragedy to marvelous effect in Head-On, showing the messiness of romantic love in all its ragged, terrible glory. -- Bailey, Andrew. Cinema Now. Taschen, 2007: 26.

 Head-On (Germany/Turkey: Fatih Akin, 2004: 121 mins)

Berchtel, Sandrah. "Identity, Cultural Representation and Feminism in the Movie Head-On." Cinej Cinema Journal #1 (October 2011): 127-139.

Brockmann, Stephen. "Gegen die Wand (2004) or Germany Goes Multicultural." A Critical History of German Film Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2010: 478-487. [Professor has copy of the book]

Ceuterick, Maud. "Streets: Freedom, Diaspora, and the Erotic in Head-On." Affirmative Aesthetics and Willful Women: Gender, Space and Mobility in Contemporary Cinema. Palgrave MacMillan, 2020: 125 - 162.

Ebert, Roger. "Unlovables love story defies convention in Head-On." Chicago Sun-Times (April 7, 2005)

Egersdoerfer, Alexander. "Turkish-German Cinema: Displacement and Diaspora in Fatih Akin’s Head-On." Strasburg Film (February 16, 2021)

Fay, Hannah. "Love Yourself, Head-On." Turkish Cinema (May 20, 2019)

Hoffgen, Maggie. "Crossing Boundaries: Gegen Die Wand (Head-On, 2004)Studying German Cinema. London: Auteur, 2009: 201-213. [BCTC Library]

Santesso, Esra Mirze. "Problematizing the Hyphen: Disorientation and Doubled Otherness in Fatih Akin’s Head-On." Postcolonial Interventions 2.1 (2016): 83-102

Tobias, Scott. The New Cult Canon: Head-On." The A.V. Club (October 1, 2009)


Friday, May 6, 2022

Student Topics for ENG 102 Argument Essays: Spring 2022


Problem of Islamophobia 
Reduce Gun Laws 
Pro-immigration, reform current laws 
Negative aspects of social media 
Healthcare-Problem of Increasing Rates of Obesity in America 
Argument for good nutritional practices 
Issue of Head Injuries in the NFL 
South Park has used satire and story to effectively make us reflect on our own negative habits, emotions, and behaviors without becoming a biased political mouthpiece for any one party. 
Critique of Sea World
Defense of Assisted-Suicide 
Problem of Obesity in America 
Addressing the Problem of Racism in America
Negative effects of Social Media 
James Loewen's Critique of How History is Taught in Schools 
Keystone Pipeline 
Addressing the Myths about GMOs 
Why College is Important 
Solitary confinement should not be used as a form of punishment. 
The Problems Associated with Social Media 
Supporting Foster Youth in Transition to Independence 
Is Addiction a Disease? 
Against the Death Penalty 
Addiction to Social Media 
Ending Mass Incarceration in America 
I will show through scientific research that when someone chooses a faith-based approach they are less likely to relapse or fall back into the same addictive behaviors. 
In support of the right to end one's life when terminally ill 
Dr Who provides us with examples of how to be better persons and of a possibly better world.

 On Simon Bolivar's Historical Importance 

We should respect the military
Was Egyptian leader Gamal Abdel Nasser a democratic leader
Dangers of a Surveillance Society 
Lack of mental health resources in America has been a severe problem for those who are suffering with mental conditions 
Community Gardens are the Solution for Our Rising Food Costs 
Importance of Technology Integration in K-12 Education 
Why Sports Betting should be legal 
Free to Play video games encourage companies to use manipulative and anti-consumer practices. 
Universal Healthcare 
Legalization of Marijuana 
Abuse of Performance Enhancing Drugs 
America's Pornography Problem 
Problem of Fast/Processed Foods 
Unethical Practice of Lootboxes in Video Games (targeted toward minors) 
Universal Healthcare 
Decriminalization of Prostitution 
Big Pharma's role in the opioid crisis 
Social Media 
Federal Legalization of Marijuana
Prison Reform 
Why Humans Need Art? 
Federal Legalization and Decriminalization of Cannabis in the United States 
A Comprehensive Understanding of Addiction 
Haunting or Hoax? Investigating the Paranormal
Healthcare in America 
Importance of Sleep for Cognitive Excellence 
Effectiveness of Economic Sanctions on Russia 
Mental Health Issues 
Fake News/Media Literacy 
Stigma, prejudice, and discrimination creates a hostile and stressful social environment that causes mental health problems throughout the homosexual community 
Problems of Mission/Missionary Programs
Treating Childhood Trauma 
Support of Abortion Rights 
In support of universal healthcare 
Critique of Standardized Testing
Cigarettes should be illegal 
Working to help children of divorce 
Paid Family Leave for both Parents 
Humane and consensual euthanasia should be available to those who are dying and are living in immense amounts of pain 
In contrast to what we’re made to believe, a diet based solely on protein and fats is the true optimal way of eating for cognitive and physiological function
Is Vladimir Putin committing war crimes with his attack on Ukraine?
Amazon's role in the American economy and how such a large corporation could lend a helping or hurting hand to our society. 
There is a rising mental health crisis in men, due to social stigmas, targeted marketing, and lack of support. 
Problems associated with a two-party political system in a democracy. 
Marijuana Legalization 
Critique of Andrew Jackson's policies as President 
Climate Change 
The “Dark Ages” was not an age of ignorance and savagery, on the contrary, it was an age of harmony and beauty, that one can witness today.
Problem of Steroid Abuse
Critique of Florida's "Don't Say Gay" Bill 
Social Media Addiction
The Importance of Sleep to Human Health 
The Corruption of Big Pharma 
Marijuana Legalization 
MMA (Mixed Martial Arts) could be a lot safer and there are a lot of different things that can be done to make the sport better in many ways 
Reform of Foster Care 
Problem of Bullying 
Marijuana Legalization 
Negative Representation of women in the Media 
Apologia for Christianity

John Stuart Mill’s principles about liberty of thought and discussion are still valid, the free interchange of ideas is the best way to learn and find out the truth.  

Importance of Sleep to Good Health 
Concerns About Screen Culture 
Raise Awareness of Scientific Understanding of ADHD 
The Black Panther Party - defense of 
Analysis of Ways to Address Supply Chain Problems 
In Defense of Our National Parks 
Abstain from Social Media 
Stronger Regulation of Big Tech 
Negative aspects of the modeling industry 
Arguing Casey Anthony was guilty of murdering her child 
Required paid leave for new parents 
In Support of Vaccines for Children 
Negative Impact of Social Media in Our Society 
The Importance of Aftercare Planning & Treatment for Addicts 
Problems of Social Media 
We are assigning too much homework for elementary students 
The Case for Universal Income 
Abortion Rights 
Cognitive Development as a Key for Personal Success 

Why Christopher Nolan is a great director. 
The benefits and shortcomings of how digital fighting games (DFG) uniquely satisfy our competitive nature. 
Vietnam War
Climate Change 
Misogyny in the Bible 
Theodore Allen's Invention of the White Race

Clearing up confusion in regards to gene editing 
The effect of automation on labor and the need for a stronger social safety net 
Royalist history of the French Revolution 
Religion and Politics 
Along with common core learning, the introduction of visual, auditory, and three-dimensional arts in elementary education is beneficial to the growth of individuality and self-regulation throughout a person’s lifetime. 
Knowing how our personal information is being used and how to safeguard ourselves in this technological age is a must if we are to gain control over our own privacy. 
The Importance of the Nation of Islam in African-American culture 
Child Abuse 
Adverse effects of digital technologies 
Regulation of Big Tech Data Collection
Regulation of Social Media Among Young Adults
The importance of soccer to Spanish identity
Addressing misinformation about Epilepsy
Need to address alcoholism in America
Causes in the rise of debilitating anxiety in young adults
Christians should be involved in politics, but need to stay true to their core values
Cell Phones are harmful when they are used irresponsibly and carelessly.


Wednesday, April 27, 2022

The Exorcist (USA: William Peter Blatty, 1973)

The Exorcist (USA: William Peter Blatty, 1973: 122 mins)

D., Margo and Margo P. "The Exorcist." Book vs Movie (December 8, 2017)
["... 1971 novel The Exorcist written by the very interesting William Peter Blatty. Based on a true-ish story about a boy possessed by a demon in the 1950s Blatty changed some of the key details to create this fiction classic. Director William Friedkin in 1973 just came off an incredible spate of box office successes including 1971’s The French Connection giving him an Academy Award for Best Director. The Exorcist became the biggest financial success of his career but turned out to be something of a curse as well."]

Dietz, Eileen. "The Exorcist." I Was There Too (March 4, 2015) ["Things get spooky this week as Eileen Dietz, the face of the demon Pazuzu aka Captain Howdy joins Matt to chat about being in the most famous horror movie of all time, The Exorcist. Eileen tells us the differences between the roles of Pazuzu & Captain Howdy, channeling wild animals for her improvised audition, her process with all the prosthetics, particularly with the puking apparatus, and her book Exorcising My Demons."]

"Rats In the Attic: William Friedkin’s The Exorcist." Cinephilia & Beyond (ND)

Murray, Noel. "William Friedkin and the Art of Immediacy." The Dissolve (May 1, 2014)

Wiggins, Steven A. "Nightmares with the Bible: The Good Book and Cinematic Demons (Horror and Scripture, 2020)." New Books in Biblical Studies (April 27, 2022) ["Nightmares with the Bible: The Good Book and Cinematic Demons (2021) published by Fortress Academic views demons through two lenses: that of western religion and that of cinema. Sketching out the long fear of demons in western history, including the Bible, Steve A. Wiggins moves on to analyze how popular movies inform our beliefs about demonic forces. Beginning with the idea of possession, he explores the portrayal of demons from ancient Mesopotamia and the biblical world (including in select extra-biblical texts), and then examines the portrayal of demons in popular horror franchises The Conjuring, The Amityville Horror, and Paranormal Activity. In the final chapter, Wiggins looks at movies that followed The Exorcist and offers new perspectives for viewing possession and exorcism. Written in non-technical language, this book is intended for anyone interested in how demons are perceived and how popular culture informs those perceptions."]










Monday, April 25, 2022

Jordan Peele (Ongoing Archive)

Get Out (2017)

Us (2019)

Nope (Forthcoming Summer 2022: Trailer)

Us (USA: Jordan Peele, 2019)

 




Films often ask performers to play multiple roles as something of a gimmick. It’s been done for comedic effect in something like “The Nutty Professor” or for philosophical examination in something like “The Double” or “Enemy.” No one has ever asked as much of a double performer as Jordan Peele asked of Lupita Nyong’o in “Us,” and the Oscar winner delivered one of the best performances of 2019 in return. As Adelaide’s worst fear comes to life and she witnesses the shadow version of her family sitting across the living room from her, the actress doesn’t just play good and evil – she goes much deeper than that. She sells both the depth behind the fear of who we presume is the “normal” Adelaide and the wounded monster who has been tied to her. For some reason, great acting has often become synonymous with either a great impersonation or a great couple of scenes. What’s most often ignored when we discuss acting is physicality. Watch what Nyong’o does with her body to both distinguish and tie the two versions of herself in “Us.” They are distinct and yet also mirrors of each other in so many ways. It’s the kind of performance one can break down scene by scene and appreciate with greater depth and nuance with each viewing. It’s not just a great 2019 performance, it’s an all-timer. (Brian Tallerico: December 23, 2019)

Us (USA: Jordan Peele, 2019: 116 mins)

Archer, Ina Diane. "Us." Film Comment (March 26, 2019)

Brody, Richard. "Jordan Peele's Us is a Colossal Cinematic Achievement." The New Yorker (March 23, 2019)

Castillo, Monica. "Us." Roger Ebert (March 20, 2019)

Due, Tannarive. "Us." Switchblade Sisters #165 (December 31, 2020) ["Tananarive Due, the producer of the groundbreaking doc ‘Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror,’ joins April Wolfe to discuss Jordan Peele’s ‘Us.’"]

Enzo and Eve. "Wakanda Deferred." Hammer & Camera #16 (July 12, 2019) ["Enzo and Eve of the Marxist "propaganda circle" Unity & Struggle to discuss their article, "Black on Both Sides: Grappling with BLM in Movies", and to review the past year of Black cinema. Among the films discussed are Black Panther, Blackkklansman, Sorry to Bother You, Blindspotting, and Us."]

Harrison, Sheri-Marie. "Us and Them." Commune (June 6, 2019) [On Jordan Peele's 2019 horror film Us.]

Koski, Genevieve, et al. "Double Troubles, Pt. 1 - Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1978)." The Next Picture Show #170 (April 2, 2019) ["Jordan Peele’s new US extends a long history of horror stories that use doppelgängers to explore identity, one that includes as a cornerstone Philip Kaufman’s 1978 adaptation of INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS. This episode we delve into the film’s eerie version of San Francisco to talk about how its atmosphere of dread and late-‘70s malaise distinguishes it from other versions of this story, and amplifies the human drama within this classic alien-invasion narrative."]

---. "Double Troubles, Pt. 2 - Us." The Next Picture Show #171 (April 9, 2019) ["Our pairing of devious doppelgängers arrives at Jordan Peele’s new US, which brings into 2019 some of the same themes of paranoia and dread seen in one of its many predecessors, Philip Kaufman’s INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS. After comparing our reactions to US’s “messy by design” narrative and the conversations that have sprung up around it, we bring these two films together to compare how they reflect their respective eras, how each works as horror, and the weird character relationships that underscore the human drama behind the allegory."]

McDonald, Soraya Nadia. "Jordan Peele’s Us has a message for those who can hear above the screams."  Andscape (March 22, 2019)

McMillan, Candice. "How Trump and #metoo Have Scared Us Into the New Decade." Chaz's Journal (March 10, 2020)


Robinson, Tasha. "Jordan Peele’s Us turns a political statement into unnerving horror." The Verge (March 22, 2019)

Yamato, Jen. "The ending of Us: Jordan Peele on who the real villains are." Los Angeles Times (March 22, 2019)













Thursday, April 21, 2022

Get Out (USA: Jordan Peele, 2017)

 




Get Out (USA: Jordan Peele, 2017: 103 mins)

Appen, Joe Von and Erik McClanahan. "Get Out / I Don't Feel at Home In This World." Adjust Your Tracking #141 (March 9, 2017)

Archer, Ina Diane. "Get Out." Film Comment (March 3, 2017)

Bakare, Lanra. "Get Out: The Film That Dares to Reveal Liberal Racism in America." The Guardian (February 28, 2017)

Breznican, Anthony. "Black Storytellers Are Using Horror to Battle Hate." Vanity Fair (August 3, 2020) ["After Get Out, movies such as Antebellum, the upcoming Candyman retelling, and other tales of terror and the macabre are part of a cultural exorcism centuries in the making."]

Butler, Bethonie. "The Brilliant Casting of Jordan Peele's Get Out." The Washington Post (March 9, 2017)

Chack, Erin. "22 Secrets Hidden in Get Out That You May Have Missed." Buzz Feed (March 3, 2017)

Colburn, Randall. "Horror and Race: How Jordan Peele’s Get Out Flips the Script." CoS (February 26, 2017)

Daniel, James Rushing. "'Another One for the Fire': George A. Romero on Race." The Los Angeles Review of Books (July 25, 2017)

Dargis, Manohla and A.O. Scott. "One Nation Under a Movie Theater? It's a Myth." The New York Times (September 7, 2017)  ["Hollywood wants us to think that its films are for everyone, but our critics say that was never true. Still, they see a way forward."]

Dowd, A.A. "Jordan Peele shifts from comedy to horror with the smart, cutting Get Out." A.V. Club (February 23, 2017)

"Get Out Syllabus."

Hancock, James, Mikhail Karadimov and Marcus Pinn. "Jordan Peele's Get Out & The Social Thriller." Wrong Reel #238 (February 28, 2017)

Harris, Brandon. "The Giant Leap Forward of Jordan Peele's Get Out." The New Yorker (March 4, 2017)

Harris, Cydnii Wilde. "Get Out as the Horror Black Films Face in the Foreign Market." (Posted on Youtube: March 14, 2018)

Hoberman, J."A Real American Horror Story." The New York Review of Books (March 13, 2017)


Hughes, Brooke Dianne-Mae. "Our Sunken Place: 'Post-Racial' America in Jordan Peele's Get Out." M.A. Thesis for the Department of English at State University of New York at Buffalo, NY: June 2018.

Jones, Matthew. "Politicizing the Horrific: How American Anxieties Play Out on Screen." Philosophy in Film (March 25, 2017)

"Jordan Peele: The Art of the Social Thriller." BAM (Film series curated by the director: February/March 2017)

Keetley, Dawn. "Get Out: Political Horror." Jordan Peele's Get Out: Political Horror. The Ohio State University Press, 2020: 1-22. 

Morris, Wesley and Jenna Wortham. "Get OutS-Town, and What To Do With Our Racial Past." Still Processing (April 13, 2017)

Novak, A.M. "Not Your Trophy: Deer Imagery in Jordan Peele's Get Out." Vague Visages (March 22, 2017)

O'Falt, Chris. "The Best Cast Films of 2017, According to Top Casting Directors." IndieWire (December 4, 2017) ["15 casting directors explain the brilliance behind their peers’ work in “Lady Bird,” “Get Out,” “The Post,” "The Shape of Water," and more."]

Oliver, Toby. "Interview with Get Out Cinematographer." Following Films (March 7, 2017)

Parham, Jason. "Get Out Proves The Only Way To Battle White Supremacy Is To Kill It." Fader (March 8, 2017)

Pasternack, Jesse. "Beneath the Paving Stones, the Nightmares!: American Social Thrillers of the 1960s." A Place for Film (February 5, 2018)

Peele, Jordan. "Jordan Peele Gets Into Horror." Still Following (March 2, 2017) ["It’s not hard to explain the premise of “Get Out.” A woman (Allison Williams) takes her boyfriend (Daniel Kaluuya) home to meet her parents (Catherine Keener and Bradley Whitford). He’s black, she and her parents are white — like, liberal white, good white. They’re totally down. What’s complicated to talk about with this film — the No. 1 movie in the country, by the way — is where the racial horror and the comedy take us and where they come from. It’s funny, scary, shocking and sad."]

Phillips, Maya. "Sorry to Bother You and the New Black Surrealism." Slate (July 18, 2018) ["Like Get Out and Atlanta, Boots Riley’s gonzo satire realizes the best way to depict black people’s reality is to depart from it."]

Phipps, Keith, Tasha Robinson and Scott Tobias. "Get Out / People Under the Stairs (Pt. 1)." The Next Picture Show #66 (March 7, 2017)

---. "Get Out / People Under the Stairs (Pt. 2)." The Next Picture Show #67 (March 9, 2017)

Pott, Julia. "My Mom's Amazing Voicemail Review of Get Out." Talkhouse (May 10, 2017)

Ratcliff, Travis Lee. "The Legacy of Paranoid Thrillers." (Posted on Vimeo: June 2017) ["Paranoid thrillers are constant in cinema's history, but at any given moment they reflect our specific anxieties back to us and reveal how we feel about our institutions. Here, I explore how paranoid thrillers crystalized as a genre in American cinema and examine the possibility of a contemporary renaissance in conspiracy fiction."]

Subissati, Andrea and Alexandra West. "Where is My Mind: The Stepford Wives (1975) and Get Out (2017)." The Faculty of Horror #67 (November 27, 2018) ["This month, Andrea and Alex tackle two films whose hearts lie in the darkest, most secret parts of suburban utopia. In Bryan Forbes’ The Stepford Wives and Jordan Peele’s Get Out, we follow protagonists who are socialized to make room for the privileged and examine what happens when they strike back."]

Wynter, Kevin. Critical Race Theory and Jordan Peele's Get Out. Bloomsbury, 2022. ["This book provides a concise introduction to critical race theory and shows how this theory can be used to interpret Jordan Peele's Get Out. It surveys recent developments in critical race studies and introduces key concepts that have helped shape the field such as Black masculinity, white privilege, the Black body, and miscegenation. The book's analysis of Get Out situates it within the context of the American horror film, illustrating how contemporary debates in critical race theory and approaches to the analysis of mainstream Hollywood cinema can illuminate each other. In this way, the book provides both an accessible reference guide to key terminology in critical race studies and film studies, while contributing new scholarship to both fields."]

Yancy, George. "Whiteness as Ambush and the Transformative Power of Vigilance." Black Bodies, White Gazes: The Continuing Significance of Race. Rowan and Littlefield, 2008: 227-247.




































Monday, April 18, 2022

Céline Sciamma (Ongoing Archive)


Water Lillies (2007)

Tomboy (2011)

Girlhood (2014) 

Portrait of a Lady on Fire (2019)

Petite Maman (2021)

Portrait of a Lady on Fire (France: Céline Sciamma, 2019)





Portrait of a Lady on Fire (France: Céline Sciamma, 2019: 119 mins)

Passion brews quietly between an artist and her subject, until together they create a space in which it can briefly flourish, in this sumptuous eighteenth-century romance from Céline Sciamma, one of contemporary French cinema’s most acclaimed auteurs. Summoned to an isolated seaside estate on a secret assignment, Marianne (Noémie Merlant) must find a way to paint a wedding portrait of Héloïse (Adèle Haenel), who is resisting chattel marriage, by furtively observing her. What unfolds in exquisite tension is an exchange of sustained gazes in which the two women come to know each other’s gestures, expressions, and bodies with rapturous intimacy, ultimately forging a subversive creative collaboration as well as a delirious romance. Charged with a yearning that almost transcends time and space, Portrait of a Lady on Fire mines the emotional and artistic possibilities that emerge when women can freely live together and see one another in a world without men. - Criterion


Balsom, Erika. "In Search of the Female Gaze." Cinema Scope #83 (Summer 2020) [" Why not give up on searching for the female gaze and persist instead in the call for another gaze, to borrow the name of the London-based feminist film journal? And yet another and another? It would leave open an intersectional space of invention and difference; it would remain sensitive to historical specificity; and it would welcome a plurality unconstrained by a binary opposition to maleness—something hardly possible in a rule-based approach that designates particular qualities as inherently feminine and others not."]

Batuman, Elif. "Céline Sciamma's Quest for a New, Feminist Grammar of Cinema." The New Yorker (January 31, 2022)

Bittencourt, Ella. "Portrait of a Lady on Fire: Daring to See." The Current (June 23, 2020) ["Around the besotted lovers, the film envisions a social contract defined by a strong sense of community among women, no matter their age or class. It takes place in the late eighteenth century, but it also speaks to our own time, as many women continue to call for intersectional solidarity in their fight for equality. It is no accident that here the engine of this revolution is art. Sciamma, who grew up outside Paris and would bike into a neighboring town to go to the movies, creates a provincial world in which art—both as a technique governed by solemn tradition and a practical tool for remaking one’s world—is a part of daily life, and in which the artist’s gaze is reciprocal, not one-sided. Similarly, the film presents the act of falling in love not through the (quintessentially male, one might say) lens of conquest and possession but through one of equality between the two lovers, creating a reality in which each can truly see the other."]

Corry, Dominic. "The Céline Sciamma Q & A." Letterboxd (February 11, 2020)

D'Avella, Katy. "Beyond the gaze: the radical desire of Portrait of a Lady on Fire." Electric Ghost (June 1, 2020)

Haenel, Adèle, et al. "Portrait of a Lady on Fire." Film Comment Podcast (October 1, 2019) ["Eugene Hernandez, FLC’s Deputy Director and Co-Publisher of Film Comment, is joined by Film Comment Editor-in-Chief Nicolas Rapold to discuss Portrait of a Lady on Fire, which the magazine is presenting at the festival. ... Then we go to last night’s Q&A for Portrait of a Lady on Fire, featuring writer-director Céline Sciamma and stars Adèle Haenel and Noémie Merlant. Moderated by Amy Taubin, they discuss a David Lynch-esque approach to sound design, the similarities between directing and painting, how art consoles the soul, the costume design, and (spoilers!) the film’s final scene."]

Henry, Alex and Carla Smith, eds. Portraits of Resistance: The Cinema of Céline Sciamma. Seventh Row (ND) [Excerpt from the book]

Ivins, Laura. "Structures of Looking in Portrait of a Lady on Fire." A Place for Film (December 16, 2020) 

Javvadi, Praveena. "Establishing Perspective in Portrait of a Lady on Fire." The Best Pictures Project (April 5, 2021)

Jeitler, Morgan. "Cinematic Memory in ‘Portrait of a Lady on Fire’ and ‘Pain and Glory.'" The Best Picture Project (April 5, 2021)








Girlhood (France: Céline Sciamma, 2014)

 



Girlhood (France: Céline Sciamma, 2014: 113 mins)

Batuman, Elif. "Céline Sciamma's Quest for a New, Feminist Grammar of Cinema." The New Yorker (January 31, 2022)

Brown, William. "Girlhood is remarkable – a film brimming with messages of empowerment." The Conversation (May 7, 2015)

Galibert-Laîné, Chloé. "Why Framing Matters in Movies." (Posted on Vimeo: 2017)

Harris, Sue. "Film of the Week: Girlhood." Sight and Sound (December 14, 2015)

Salmon, Caspar. "The Action Cinema of Céline Sciamma." The Notebook (February 18, 2022)

Kohn, Eric. "Céline Sciamma's Girlhood Is One of the Best Coming of Age Movies In Years." Indiewire (May 15, 2014)

Scott, A.O. "Exploring the Limits in a Man’s World: In Girlhood, a French Adolescent Comes Out of Her Shell." The New York Times (January 3, 2015)

Wilson, Emma. "Scenes of Hurt and Rapture: Céline Sciamma's Girlhood." Film Quarterly 70.3 (Spring 2017): 10-22.
















Thursday, April 14, 2022

Tomboy (France: Céline Sciamma, 2011)





 Tomboy (France: Céline Sciamma, 2011: 84 mins)


"A sensitive, heartrending portrait of what it feels like to grow up different, Sciamma’s beautifully observed coming-of-age tale aches tenderly with the tangled confusion of childhood. When 10-year-old Laure’s family moves to a new neighborhood during the summer, the gender-nonconforming preteen (played by the impressively naturalistic Zoé Héran) takes the opportunity to present as Mickäel to the neighborhood kids—testing the waters of a new identity that neither friends nor family quite understand. Sciamma’s warmly empathetic tone is perfectly complemented by the soft-lit impressionism of Fournier’s glowing cinematography." - "The Female Gaze" (2018)

Batuman, Elif. "Céline Sciamma's Quest for a New, Feminist Grammar of Cinema." The New Yorker (January 31, 2022)

Chang, Chris. "Short Takes: Tomboy." Film Comment (November-December 2011)

Ebert, Roger. "This may form her adulthood, or just be forgotten." Chicago Sun-Times (January 25, 2012)


Holt, Julian. "Transmasculine Identities And The Paradox Of Language: Tomboy, A Reflection." Radical Art Review (July 18, 2021)

Klinghoffer, Ariel. "The radical queer politics and bittersweet legacy of Tomboy." Little White Lies (April 18, 2021)

Salmon, Caspar. "The Action Cinema of Céline Sciamma." The Notebook (February 18, 2022)

Temple, Melissa Bow. "It's Okay to Be Neither." Together for Jackson County Kids (December 16, 2011)












Tuesday, April 12, 2022

Dune (Part 1 - USA/Canada: Denis Villeneuve, 2021)





 Dune (Part 1 - USA/Canada: Denis Villeneuve, 2021: 155 mins)

Ahuja, Nitin K. "Medicine." Los Angeles Review of Books (March 27, 2022)

Armstrong, Vanessa. "For Dune, Composer Hans Zimmer Created Beats That Were 'Humanly Impossible to Play.'" Tor (March 2, 2022)

Baheyeldin, Khalid, et al. "The Book of Dune." Imaginary Worlds (July 12, 2017) ["Frank Herbert’s 1965 novel Dune and its sequels tackled a lot of big themes. The books are about ecology. They’re about journeys of self-realization through mind-altering substances. But religion is at the core of the series, since the main character Paul Atreides transforms from a teenage aristocrat into a messianic revolutionary leader of a nomadic desert tribe. And the real world religion that Frank Herbert borrows from the most is Islam. Khalid Baheyeldin, Salman Sayyid, and Sami Shah discuss why the book resonated deeply with them, despite the fact that Frank Herbert wasn’t Muslim. And Liel Liebowitz explains why the novel even spoke to him as an Israeli."]

Breen, Benjamin. "Pharmacology." The Los Angeles Review of Books (March 27, 2022)

Dick, Stephanie. "Computers." The Los Angeles Review of Books (March 27, 2022)

Dietrich, Christopher. "Harvesting." The Los Angeles Review of Books (March 27, 2022)

Dolan, Thomas Simsarian. "Decolonizing Dune: Reimagining MENA and the Muslim World." Tropics of Meta (December 21, 2021)

Durrani, Haris A. "Sietchposting: A Short Guide to Recent Work on Dune." Los Angeles Review of Books (March 27, 2022)

Hadadi, Roxana. "Dune Has a Desert Problem." Vulture (October 29, 2021)

Hudson, David. "Denis Villeneuve's Dune." The Daily (September 16, 2021)

---. "Dune: Beware of Heroes." The Daily (November 2, 2021)

Like Stories of Old. "Into the Dark Depths of Humanity – Understanding Denis Villeneuve." (Posted on Youtube: October 31, 2021) ["A deep dive analysis of the filmmaking philosophy of Denis Villeneuve, and of the themes and meanings found in his work."]

Moore, Taylor M. "Ethnography." Los Angeles Review of Books (March 27, 2022)

Nuriddin, Ayah. "Eugenics." Los Angeles Review of Books (Marhc 27, 2022)

Shakry, Omnia El. "Language." Los Angeles Review of Books (March 27, 2022)













Blade Runner 2049 (UK/USA/Canada: Denis Villeneuve, 2017)





Blade Runner 2049 (UK/USA/Canada: Denis Villeneuve, 2017: 163 mins) 

Aisenberg, Joseph. "I am Blade Runner 2049Blade Runner 2049 is I." Bright Lights Film Journal (November 3, 2017)

Alpert, Robert. "A.I. at the Movies and the Second Coming." Senses of Cinema #88 (October 2018)

Desowitz, Bill. "Why Roger Deakins Should Win the Oscar for Bringing Realism to Blade Runner 2049." IndieWire (October 5, 2017)

"Dive Deeper into Blade Runner 2049 with Roger Deakins, ASC, BSC." American Cinematographer (March 5, 2018)

Engley, Ryan and Todd McGowan. "Blade Runner 2049." Why Theory (October 23, 2017) ["In this episode, Todd and Ryan discuss Denis Villeneuve's Blade Runner 2049. The conversation centers around how the film depicts ideology and what we mean when we say "ideology"; how the film conceives of desire ensuring subjectivity; and how the relationship between police and capital in the film exposes a link to how the two function in everyday life."]

Fox, Neil and Dario Linares. "Blade Runner 2049." The Cinematologists (October 18, 2017) ["With the original Blade Runner being a formative film for both Dario and Neil, they take the time to discuss the 2017 sequel directed by Denis Villeneuve: Blade Runner 2049. A lot has been said and written about this new incarnation, directly about the aesthetics, philosophical themes and narrative, but also regarding the wider ideological readings related to gender, race and class. We hope you enjoy our contribution to the discourse around a film which, if nothing else, reminds us of cinema's ability to provoke thought and exercise passion."]

Gerwig, Greta, et al. "63 Minute Directors Roundtable Talk." The Hollywood Reporter (Posted on Playlist: January 22, 2018) ["Angelina Jolie (“First They Killed My Father”), Patty Jenkins (“Wonder Woman”), Greta Gerwig (“Lady Bird”), Joe Wright (“Darkest Hour”), Guillermo del Toro (“The Shape of Water”), and Denis Villeneuve (“Blade Runner 2049”)."]

Jagernauth, Kevin. "Blade Runner 2049 Editor Talks Deleted Scenes You’ll Probably Never See." The Playlist (October 30, 2017)

"Jared Leto Stars in a New Prequel to Blade Runner 2049: Watch It Free Online." Open Culture (August 31, 2017)

Koski, Genvieve, et al. "Blade Runner 2049 (2017) / Blade Runner (1982), Part 1." The Next Picture Show #98 (October 17, 2017)

---. "Blade Runner 2049 (2017) / Blade Runner (1982), Part 2." The Next Picture Show #99 (October 19, 2017)

Laczkowski, Jim, et al. "Denis Villeneuve." The Director's Club #140 (December 17, 2017) ["Now Playing Network Master of Ceremonies (and Director's Club founder) Jim Laczkowski joins us for this episode which has us looking at the films of French Canadian filmmaker Denis Villeneuve! With Jim's help, we look at how Villeneuve brings his unique combination of thoughtfulness, pathos, family focus, and strangeness to dramas, genre thrillers, and films across the sci-fi spectrum. Includes lots of spiders and one talking fish."]

Landsberg, Alison. "What's So Bad About Being a Replicant?" On the Media (October 6, 2017)

Like Stories of Old. "In Search of the Distinctively Human: The Philosophy of Blade Runner 2049." (Posted on Youtube: Jan 29, 2018) [Uses Ernest Becker's The Birth and Death of Meaning and Viktor Frankl's Man's Search for Meaning.]

---. "The Problem of Other Minds – How Cinema Explores Consciousness." (Posted on Youtube: May 31, 2018) ["How have films engaged the problem of other minds? In this video essay, I discuss cinematic explorations into consciousness in the context of the cognitive revolution that has challenged many of the basic assumptions about what was for a long time believed to be a uniquely human trait." Uses Frans de Waal's book Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are?: "Hailed as a classic, Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are? explores the oddities and complexities of animal cognition--in crows, dolphins, parrots, sheep, wasps, bats, chimpanzees, and bonobos--to reveal how smart animals really are, and how we've underestimated their abilities for too long. Did you know that octopuses use coconut shells as tools, that elephants classify humans by gender and language, and that there is a young male chimpanzee at Kyoto University whose flash memory puts that of humans to shame? Fascinating, entertaining, and deeply informed, de Waal's landmark work will convince you to rethink everything you thought you knew about animal--and human--intelligence."]

Fox, Neil and Dario Linares. "Blade Runner 2049." The Cinematologists (October 18, 2017) ["With the original Blade Runner being a formative film for both Dario and Neil, they take the time to discuss the 2017 sequel directed by Denis Villeneuve: Blade Runner 2049. A lot has been said and written about this new incarnation, directly about the aesthetics, philosophical themes and narrative, but also regarding the wider ideological readings related to gender, race and class. We hope you enjoy our contribution to the discourse around a film which, if nothing else, reminds us of cinema's ability to provoke thought and exercise passion."]

Maher, Michael. "How Roger Deakins Shot and Lit Blade Runner 2049." The Beat (October 16, 2017)

Rosenberg, Alyssa. "‘Blade Runner 2049’ is about learning that you’re not the main character in your own story." The Washington Post (October 17, 2017)

StudioBinder. "Denis Villeneuve & His Cinema of Ambiguity — Directing Styles Explained." (Posted on Youtube: April 6, 2020) ["Denis Villeneuve movies are made to confuse you. At every opportunity — in the story, in the cinematography, editing, and music, Villeneuve wants to keep you guessing. Watching Denis Villeneuve movies is to be placed in an environment of uncertainty. And that’s what makes them so interesting. In films like Enemy, Prisoners, Polytechnique, Blade Runner 2049, and Arrival, Villeneuve consistently creates awe and wonder with images and sounds we’ve never seen before. In Enemy, Adam (Jake Gyllenhaal) must confront the possibility that he is more than a single person. In Sicario, Kate (Emily Blunt) is pushed into the world of drug cartels by a tight-lipped company man (Josh Brolin) and a near-silent assassin (Benicio Del Toro). In Prisoners, Keller (Hugh Jackman) ventures into murky moral territory to find his kidnapped daughter. In Arrival, Louise (Amy Adams) and Ian (Jeremy Renner) are tasked with bridging the communication gap between beings from another dimension. In all these movies, the characters find themselves in new worlds without answers. In this video, we’ve cracked the code on Villeneuve’s love of ambiguity and we explain how his directing style works across 7 areas of focus including sound, color, production design, and more. Villeneuve creates movies that can be enigmatic but there’s no denying that he is a film artist in complete control of his medium. If you’re studying directing, cinematography, editing, or pursuing ANY career in filmmaking, there are a ton of lessons to be learned from Denis Villeneuve. This is the ultimate breakdown of Denis Villeneuve’s directing style."]

Werff, Tom Van Der. "The best thing about Blade Runner 2049 is what it isn’t." Vox (October 9, 2017)














Arrival (USA: Denis Villeneuve, 2016)

 





Arrival (USA: Denis Villeneuve, 2016: 116 mins)

Adams, Amy, et al. "Watch Isabelle Huppert, Emma Stone, Amy Adams & More Discuss Acting in 50-Minute Roundtable."  Film Stage (January 30, 2017) [" Isabelle Huppert (Elle), Emma Stone (La La Land), Amy Adams (Arrival), Natalie Portman (Jackie), Naomie Harris (Moonlight), Annette Bening (20th Century Women), and Taraji P. Henson (Hidden Figures)."]

Art of the Title. "Know Your 2017 Below-the-Line Oscar Nominees." The Film Stage (January 30, 2017) ["The major below-the-line categories are Cinematography, Production Design, Sound Editing/Mixing, Visual Effects, Costume Design, and Makeup and Hairstyling . On the best productions (including those that the Academy labels Best Picture), the work of these crucial visual elements often blend together so seamlessly that it's hard to pick their creators' work.Thankfully, Art of The Film has created a series of supercuts called Oscars in One Minute that isolate the work of these artists so we can fully recognize their importance and beauty within each respective production."]

Buckley, Cara. "Denis Villeneuve of Arrival Leans Into Strong Heroines." The New York Times (November 13, 2016)

Cassidy, Brendan, J.D. Duran and Richard Newby. "Arrival, Top 3 "Thinking" Sci-Fi Movies, The Deathly Hallows Part 2 ." InSession Film (November 15, 2016)

Chiang, Ted. "Story of Your Life." (Original novella published in 1998 in Starlight 2 that the film is adapted from)

Desowitz, Bill. " How Composer Jóhann Jóhannsson Found a New Musical Language for Denis Villeneuve’s Arrival." IndieWire (November 21, 2016)

Eggert, Brian. "Arrival (2016)." Deep Focus Review (November 11, 2016)

Jones, Matthew. "Arrival (2016): Will We Understand Aliens When (If) They Arrive?" Philosophy in Film (December 18, 2019)

Kermode, Mark. "Arrival: A Poetic Vision of Contact With Aliens." The Guardian (November 13, 2016)

Koski, Genevieve, et al. "Contact / Arrival. Pt. 1." The Next Picture Show (November 29, 2016) ["This week, we look to the skies to consider two films about the difficulty of communication between worlds, and the inward journeys involved in looking to the stars. Inspired by Denis Villeneuve’s new ARRIVAL, we begin with an in-depth discussion of an earlier film with which it shares many thematic and narrative elements: Robert Zemeckis' 1997 Carl Sagan adaptation CONTACT. We consider the film’s ambition, dissect its blockbuster qualities, and try to determine what makes this unwieldy, emotional movie work so well, almost despite itself. (Spoiler: It’s mostly Jodie Foster.)"]

---. "Contact / Arrival, Pt. 2." The Next Picture Show (December 1, 2016) ["Our conversation about movies about talking to aliens moves to the present with Denis Villeneuve’s new ARRIVAL, which hits many of the same narrative points as CONTACT, but points them in a different emotional direction. We talk about our reactions to the newer film, and how its ideas about science, communication, and emotion compare with CONTACT’s."]

Laczkowski, Jim, et al. "Denis Villeneuve." The Director's Club #140 (December 17, 2017) ["Now Playing Network Master of Ceremonies (and Director's Club founder) Jim Laczkowski joins us for this episode which has us looking at the films of French Canadian filmmaker Denis Villeneuve! With Jim's help, we look at how Villeneuve brings his unique combination of thoughtfulness, pathos, family focus, and strangeness to dramas, genre thrillers, and films across the sci-fi spectrum. Includes lots of spiders and one talking fish."]

Lane, Anthony. "The Consuming Fervor of Arrival." The New Yorker (November 14, 2016)

Mayer, Sophie. "Girl Power: Back to the Future of Feminist Science Fiction with Into the Forest and Arrival." Film Quarterly 70.3 (Spring 2017): 32-42.

Muller, and Nate Zoebl. "Arrival (2016)." Psycho Drive-In (November 13, 2016)

Roark, David. "Alien and Time: The Philosophy of Arrival." Balder & Dash (December 8, 2016)

Statt, Nick. "How the short story that inspired Arrival helps us interpret the film’s major twist." The Verge (November 16, 2016)

StudioBinder. "Denis Villeneuve & His Cinema of Ambiguity — Directing Styles Explained." (Posted on Youtube: April 6, 2020) ["Denis Villeneuve movies are made to confuse you. At every opportunity — in the story, in the cinematography, editing, and music, Villeneuve wants to keep you guessing. Watching Denis Villeneuve movies is to be placed in an environment of uncertainty. And that’s what makes them so interesting. In films like Enemy, Prisoners, Polytechnique, Blade Runner 2049, and Arrival, Villeneuve consistently creates awe and wonder with images and sounds we’ve never seen before. In Enemy, Adam (Jake Gyllenhaal) must confront the possibility that he is more than a single person. In Sicario, Kate (Emily Blunt) is pushed into the world of drug cartels by a tight-lipped company man (Josh Brolin) and a near-silent assassin (Benicio Del Toro). In Prisoners, Keller (Hugh Jackman) ventures into murky moral territory to find his kidnapped daughter. In Arrival, Louise (Amy Adams) and Ian (Jeremy Renner) are tasked with bridging the communication gap between beings from another dimension. In all these movies, the characters find themselves in new worlds without answers. In this video, we’ve cracked the code on Villeneuve’s love of ambiguity and we explain how his directing style works across 7 areas of focus including sound, color, production design, and more. Villeneuve creates movies that can be enigmatic but there’s no denying that he is a film artist in complete control of his medium. If you’re studying directing, cinematography, editing, or pursuing ANY career in filmmaking, there are a ton of lessons to be learned from Denis Villeneuve. This is the ultimate breakdown of Denis Villeneuve’s directing style."]












 Denis Villeneuve Through Glass || Video Essay from Mikolaj Kacprzak on Vimeo.









 Video Essay #6 - Words and Love in Arrival from Lukas Grevis on Vimeo.