Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Julian Assange: Journalist/Wikileaks/Political Prisoner

Allyn, Bobby. "Jailing And Fining Chelsea Manning Constitutes Torture, Top U.N. Official Says." Dialogic Cinephilia (December 31, 2019)

Chelsea Manning: Soldier/Whistleblower/Political Prisoner/Activist Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

Cogan, James and Kevin Reed. "Chelsea Manning imprisoned without charge for six months for refusing to testify against Julian Assange." WSWS (September 21, 2019)

Cromwell, David and David Edwards. "Assange Arrest - Part 1: 'So Now He's Our Property.'" Media Lens (April 16, 2019)

---. "Assange Arrest – Part 2: ‘A Definite Creep, A Probable Rapist.'" Media Lens (April 18, 2019)

Edwards, David. "The Shaving Kit - Manufacturing The Julian Assange Witch-Hunt." Media Lens (June 20, 2019)

Goodale, James. "The Assange Indictment & The 50-Year War On Investigative Journalism." On the Media (May 24, 2019) ["... when Wikileaks founder Julian Assange was indicted for conspiring to assist leaker Chelsea Manning in the theft of government secrets, some saw the charge as but the first shoe to drop. They were right. Thursday saw an 18-count indictment against Assange under the Espionage Act, effectively charging him, the leakee, as equally criminal in an effort to spread classified information. Whether or not you consider Assange to be a "journalist," the precedent of this indictment could have disastrous implications for investigative reporters who rely on such sources. According to James Goodale, who served as General Counsel for The New York Times during the Pentagon Papers trial, the Department of Justice has been looking to expand the Espionage Act in this way for nearly half a century. He and Bob discuss how Goodale saw the charges coming, and where the trial is headed next."]

Justice4Assange

Lewis, Eric. "As an American lawyer, I don't want to see Julian Assange extradited to my country." The Independent (May 28, 2019)

Paul, Deanna. "How the indictmen t of Julian Assange could criminalize investigative journalism." The Washington Post (May 27, 2019)

Robinson, Jennifer. "Julian Assange’s Attorney Decries Espionage Charges as 'Grave Threat to Press Freedom.'" Democracy Now (May 24, 2019) ["In an unprecedented move, the Justice Department has indicted WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange on 17 charges of violating the Espionage Act for his role in publishing U.S. classified military and diplomatic documents exposing U.S. war crimes in Iraq and Afghanistan. The documents were leaked by U.S. Army whistleblower Chelsea Manning. The Espionage Act of 1917 has never been used to prosecute a journalist or media outlet. The new charges come just over a month after British police forcibly removed Assange from the Ecuadorean Embassy in London, where he took asylum in 2012. Initially the Trump administration indicted Assange on a single count of helping Manning hack a government computer, but Assange faces up to 170 additional years in prison under the new charges—10 years for each count of violating the Espionage Act. We speak with Jennifer Robinson, an attorney for Julian Assange. “It is a grave threat to press freedom and should be cause for concern for journalists and publishers everywhere,” Robinson says." Part two: "Daniel Ellsberg: Espionage Charges Against Assange Are Most Significant Attack on Press in Decades." Part three: "Jeremy Scahill: New Indictment of Assange Is Part of a Broader War on Journalism & Whistleblowers." Part four: "Assange Is Indicted for Exposing War Crimes While Trump Considers Pardons for War Criminals."]


Dialogic Cinephilia - May 28, 2019

Baiocchi, Gianpaolo. "Brazil's Tenuous Relationship with Democracy." Democracy Works (March 4, 2019) ["To say Brazil has had a complicated history with democracy is an understatement. The country has bounced in and out of authoritarian regimes for hundreds of years, with democracy never having quite enough time to really take hold. Following the election of Jair Bolsonaro in October 2018, many are wondering whether the cycle is about to repeat itself again. Gianpaolo Baiocchi is a professor of individualized studies and sociology at NYU, where he also directs the Urban Democracy Lab. He's from Brazil and has written extensively about the country's politics and social movements. He joins us this week to talk about Bolsonaro's appeal, the use of misinformation on WhatsApp during the election, and why Bolsonaro is often called the "Trump of the tropics." We also discuss Brazil's history of activism under authoritarian governments and whether we'll see it return now."]

Benton, Michael. "Themes: 21st Century SF/Bong Joon-ho/Acting: Kristen Stewart/Philippe Garrel/Acting & Directing: Ensembles." Letterboxd (Future Film Course)

Chang, Lauren and Shira Taylor. "Sex Ed Through Social Action Theatre." Talking Radical Radio (November 6, 2018) [MB - It would seem to me that if you truly wanted to decrease unwanted pregnancies (and the rate of abortions) then a first necessary step would be to actually educate your citizens about sex and sexuality (sincere discussions with a sex positive emphasis and working to empower young citizens through learning about themselves & their bodies would be the result). What sane person would be against this?]

El Goro. "It's a Wonderful Life (1946) and Miracle of 34th Street (1947)." Talk Without Rhythm #397 (December 6, 2017)

Liu, Rebecca. "Céline Sciamma’s ‘Portrait de la jeune fille en feu’ (Portrait of a Lady on Fire) explores the boundlessness of poetic love – Cannes." Another Gaze (May 23, 2019)

---. "Rebecca Zlotowski’s ‘Une fille facile’ (‘An Easy Girl’) takes on the cliché of the woman of leisure – Cannes." Another Gaze (May 25, 2019)

Paveck, Hannah. "No Other Voice: Claire Denis' High Life." Another Gaze (May 27, 2019)

Roth, Alvin. "For Sale, By Owner: The Psychology Of Repugnant Transactions." Hidden Brains (March 4, 2019)




Rubinstein, Bessie. "Chaining Female Reproduction to Analogy: Kantemir Balagov’s Beanpole." Another Gaze (May 24, 2019)








Monday, May 27, 2019

Dialogic Cinephilia - March 27, 2019

Ashcroft, Richard, David Healy and Emily Jackson. "Brave New World." Forum for Philosophy (March 2, 2019) ["In this age of utopian technologies, we can design mechanical limbs for amputees and chemically engineer happiness for depressives. From the fluoride in our water to genetically modified babies, scientific advances pose complex new ethical questions. We explore the major bioethical issues of our time. Is philosophy braced for this brave new world? Are scientists and engineers morally obliged to design a utopia? Or are things best left to ‘nature’?"]

Clouds of Sils Maria (France/Switzerland/Germany: Olivier Assayas, 2014) Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

Haskell, Molly. "iClouds of Sils Maria." The Current (June 30, 2016)




Haskell, Molly and Andrew Sarris. "A Critics' Duet on Nashville." The Village Voice (November 21, 2006)

Hudson, David. "Annie Silverstein's Bull." The Current (May 16, 2019)

Knust, Jennifer, Scott Lewis and Delphine Lourtau. "The First Stone: Jesus, The Accused, and Us." Ideas (April 18, 2019) ["Sean Foley asks: what does the story say to us about some of our deepest dilemmas?"]

"Molly Haskel." Supporting Characters #31 (December 11, 2017) ["Bill talks to author and film critic Molly Haskell about some of the many contributions she’s made to film culture, from writing film criticism for publications like The Village Voice and Vogue to developing books like her landmark FROM REVERENCE TO RAPE: THE TREATMENT OF WOMEN IN THE MOVIES and the recent STEVEN SPIELBERG: A LIFE IN FILMS. Other topics covered include: Feminism, Andrew Sarris, Leo McCarey, DIABOLIQUE, the Sarasota French Film Festival, Twitter, Pauline Kael, women’s films of the 1970s, film theory, Agnes Varda, the origins of the National Society Of Film Critics and New York film culture in the 1960s."]

Nickson-Lopez, Jessie and April Wolfe. "Rosemary's Baby." Switchblade Sisters #7 (December 21, 2017) ["April talks to Stranger Things and Narcos writer Jessie Nickson-Lopez about the controversial film, Rosemary's Baby. The two dive right into the complicated relationship they both have with the film, and what makes the movie so effective. Jessie discusses how she is inspired by Roman Polanski's work, while simultaneously hating him as a person. She also shares her writing process and what it's like in the writers room. A WARNING to our listeners, April and Jessie talk in depth about sexual assault and the sexual crimes that Roman Polanski has committed."]

Takal, Sophia and April Wolfe. "Body Double." Switchblade Sisters #6 (December 14, 2017) ["Things get steamy as April talks to actress and director Sophia Takal about the somewhat problematic Brian De Palma erotic thriller, Body Double. The two discuss how the film influenced Sophia's own work and her debut film, Always Shine. Sophia recalls her time as an actress, and the objectification that came with the audition process. They also analyze the violence against women's bodies in the film and the sexuality of Melanie Griffith's character, Holly Body. Despite its issues, April and Sophia also marvel at the craftsmanship of Brian De Palma, and how this film can be used as a template for how NOT to treat female characters."]





Clouds of Sils Maria (France/Switzerland/Germany: Olivier Assayas, 2014)




Clouds of Sils Maria (France/Switzerland/Germany: Olivier Assayas, 2014: 124 mins)

"Clouds of Sils Maria." The Film Stage #138 (April 20, 2015)

Enelow, Shonni. "Juliet Binoche's Clouds of Sils Maria." Reverse Shot (October 22, 2015)

Hachard, Thomas. "Women Ascend With Uncertainty In 'Clouds Of Sils Maria'." NPR (April 9, 2015)

Haskell, Molly. "iClouds of Sils Maria." The Current (June 30, 2016)

Holmes, Taylor. "A Complete Clouds of Sils Maria Walkthrough and Explanation." THiNC (April 10, 2015)

Keating, Shannon. "Highbrow No Homo: The Art of Queer Representation in Clouds of Sils Maria." Bitch Media (August 6, 2014)

Kohn, Eric. "Never Seen an Olivier Assayas Film? Start With 'Clouds of Sils Maria,' Starring Kristen Stewart and Juliette Binoche." IndieWire (April 6, 2015)

Koresky, Michael. "Clouds of Sils Maria." Reverse Shot (April 8, 2015)

Koresky, Michael and Jeff Reichert. "Binoche Auteur." Reverse Shot (July 1, 2019)

Lane, Anthony. "Way Up High: The Clouds of Sils Maria." The New Yorker
(April 20, 2015)

Lucca, Violet and Nicolas Rapold. "The July/August Issue." The Film Comment Podcast (July 5, 2016) [Cover story is on Kristen Stewart]

McGavin, Patrick Z. "The Moral Unknown: L'avventura as Influential Text on Clouds of Sils Maria and About Elly." Roger Ebert (April 9, 2015)

Paulus, Tom. "The Disappearance of Kristen Stewart (and Other Mysteries in Contemporary Art Cinema)." Photogenie (October 2014)

Sragow, Michael. "Deep Focus: Clouds of Sils Maria." Film Comment (April 5, 2015)

Stewart, Kristen. "Clouds of Sils Maria." The Treatment (April 15, 2015)

Tobias, Scott. "Clouds of Sils Maria." The Dissolve (April 7, 2015)



Actors Playing Actors Acting- Video Essay from Phil Whitehead on Vimeo.







Sunday, May 26, 2019

Dialogic Cinephilia - May 26, 2019

Berkow, Ira. "Stealing Home: A Tribute to Jackie Robinson." Ideas (April 15, 2019) ["The National Baseball Hall of Fame quotes trailblazer Jackie Robinson: "a life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives." Robinson's life had a huge impact, especially when he broke down the colour barrier in Major League Baseball and American society. His rookie season still stands as one of the most politically profound events in the history of organized sport."]

Brown, Alleen. "Pipeline Opponents Strike Back Against Anti-Protest Laws." The Intercept (May 23, 2019)

Goldsmith, Leo. "Claire Denis' Early Career." Reverse Shot (June 26, 2009)




Hudson, David. "Bong Joon-ho's Parasite." The Current (May 23, 2019)

---. "Jim Jarmusch's The Dead Don't Die." The Current (May 15, 2019)

---. "Quentin Dupieux's Deerskin." The Current (May 16, 2019)




Kaufman, Sophie Monks. "High Life." Little White Lies #79 (March/April 2019) ["I’ve seen this film three times. Why see a film three times? The lure of intense mystery that beguiles you into trying to solve it again and again; the transference of an intoxication that makes you feel physically different afterwards. It sounds hyperbolic to describe art as having such power, but surely the reason we care about art is a belief that such power exists. High Life is too layered, too ambiguous, too potent to be about any one thing. My interpretation is unlikely to be the same as other interpretations. All I can say is that it’s a pleasure to have my reviewing faculties blown and my psyche splintered by this master filmmaker. The art we love works to expose our values, our tastes. My taste for Claire Denis leaves me feeling totally exposed, like a baby burbling to a benign authority while adult emotions twist in the darkness of the universe."]





Robinson, Jennifer. "Julian Assange’s Attorney Decries Espionage Charges as 'Grave Threat to Press Freedom.'" Democracy Now (May 24, 2019) ["In an unprecedented move, the Justice Department has indicted WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange on 17 charges of violating the Espionage Act for his role in publishing U.S. classified military and diplomatic documents exposing U.S. war crimes in Iraq and Afghanistan. The documents were leaked by U.S. Army whistleblower Chelsea Manning. The Espionage Act of 1917 has never been used to prosecute a journalist or media outlet. The new charges come just over a month after British police forcibly removed Assange from the Ecuadorean Embassy in London, where he took asylum in 2012. Initially the Trump administration indicted Assange on a single count of helping Manning hack a government computer, but Assange faces up to 170 additional years in prison under the new charges—10 years for each count of violating the Espionage Act. We speak with Jennifer Robinson, an attorney for Julian Assange. “It is a grave threat to press freedom and should be cause for concern for journalists and publishers everywhere,” Robinson says." Part two: "Daniel Ellsberg: Espionage Charges Against Assange Are Most Significant Attack on Press in Decades." Part three: "Jeremy Scahill: New Indictment of Assange Is Part of a Broader War on Journalism & Whistleblowers." Part four: "Assange Is Indicted for Exposing War Crimes While Trump Considers Pardons for War Criminals."]

Taubin, Amy. "Cannes Interview: Jim Jarmusch." Film Comment (May 14, 2019)


Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Dialogic Cinephilia - May 22, 2019


Collins, David W. "Halloween: The Music." The Soundtrack Show (October 3, 2018) ["In just three days, director and film composer John Carpenter wrote a classic horror film score. Go behind the scenes and hear the story of how it all came together. We'll also analyze the music, and talk about why it still scares us decades later."]

Duke, Annie and Robert Vaughan. "Playing The Gender Card: Overlooking And Overthrowing Sexist Stereotypes." Hidden Brain (January 17, 2019) ["This week on the Hidden Brain radio show, we tell the stories of two people who grapple with gender stereotypes on the job. In the first part of the show, Annie Duke takes us through her experiencing competing at the 2004 World Series of Poker Tournament of Champions. Later in the program, we hear the story of Robert Vaughan, a former Navy sailor who decides to pursue a new career as a nurse. 'The first thing that went through my head was, well, that's a woman's job,' Robert said. 'That's not something that, really, men go into.'"]

Eban, Katherine. "Bottle of Lies: How Poor FDA Oversight & Fraud in Generic Drug Industry Threaten Patients’ Health." Democracy Now (May 20, 2019) ["Generic drugs amount to 90% of all prescriptions filled in the U.S., most of them made in plants in India and China. Generic drugs can be more affordable, but in her new explosive book “Bottle of Lies: The Inside Story of the Generic Drug Boom,” investigative journalist Katherine Eban works with two industry whistleblowers to expose how some manufacturers are cutting corners at the cost of quality and safety. This comes as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration just issued its own update on the state of pharmaceutical quality that found the drug quality of factories in India and China scored below the world average. FDA officials say that’s because more robust inspections have uncovered problems and that “the quality of the drug supply has never been higher.”"]

Kelly, Ray. "Film historian explains difficult journey in ‘Unmasking’ famed filmmaker Frank Capra." Mass Live (April 12, 2019)

Powers, Richard. "Richard Powers with Tayari Jones." Lannan Podcasts (February 27, 2019) ["Richard Powers is the author of 12 novels. These works employ multiple narrative frames to explore connections among disciplines as disparate as photography, artificial intelligence, musical composition, genomics, game theory, virtual reality, race, business, and ecology. He has said, “Science is not about control. It is about cultivating a perpetual condition of wonder in the face of something that forever grows one step richer and subtler than our latest theory about it. It is about reverence, not mastery.” His novels include Three Farmers on Their Way to a Dance (1985), inspired by German photographer August Sander’s 1914 image of the same title; The Gold Bug Variations (1991), a double love story of two young couples separated by a distance of 25 years; and The Echo Maker(2007), whose main character, Mark, suffers a traumatic brain injury in a car accident and becomes convinced that the woman who looks, acts, and sounds just like his sister Karin is actually an imposter. His most recent book, The Overstory (2018), is a tale of activism and resistance, about the secret language of trees and the people they bring together to save the last few remaining acres of virgin forest. In the New York Times Book Review, author Barbara Kingsolver called it “monumental… The Overstory accomplishes what few living writers from either camp, art or science, could attempt. Using the tools of the story, he pulls readers heart-first into a perspective so much longer-lived and more subtly developed than the human purview that we gain glimpses of a vast, primordial sensibility, while watching our own kind get whittled down to size… A gigantic fable of genuine truths.”"]

Pulver, Andrew. "Stanley Kubrick: film's obsessive genius rendered more human." The Guardian (April 26, 2019)

Recommended Films of 2018 Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

Tuma, Mary. "Texas Anti-Choice Legislation Continues to Damage Health Care and Undermine Local Control." The Austin Chronicle (May 17, 2019) ["As GOP postures with SB 22, women’s health care pays the price."]








Tuesday, May 21, 2019

Halloween (USA: John Carpenter, 1978)





Halloween (USA: John Carpenter, 1978: 91 mins)

Blyth, Mike, et al. "Slashers, Pt. 1: An Introduction." The Evolution of Horror (September 8, 2017) ["This week Mike is joined by BFI Programmer Michael Blyth and film collective 'The Final Girls' to discuss the tropes, the peaks and the troughs of the slasher sub genre. What makes the slasher one of the most successful horror sub-genres? Why do we love watching endless Jason or Freddy sequels, when they all pretty much follow the same formula? And is there anything feminist about a sub-genre which celebrates and fetishises the dismemberment of pretty teenage girls?"]

Collins, David W. "Halloween: The Music." The Soundtrack Show (October 3, 2018) ["In just three days, director and film composer John Carpenter wrote a classic horror film score. Go behind the scenes and hear the story of how it all came together. We'll also analyze the music, and talk about why it still scares us decades later."]

D'Angelo, Mike. "Halloween gets its best scares from the creepiness of being followed." AV Club (October 31, 2014)

Fichera, Blake and James Hancock. "John Carpenter, Horror Master." Wrong Reel #272 (May 29, 2017)

Hewitt, Chris, Mike Muncer and Jacob Stolworthy. "Slasher Pt. 5: Halloween (1978)." The Evolution of Horror (October 13, 2017)

Kuersten, Erich. "CinemArchetype #3: The Animus." Acidemic (February 1, 2012)

Loudermilk, A. "Last to Leave the Theater: Sissy Spectatorship of Stalker Movies and the "Final Girls" Who Survive Them." Bright Lights Film Journal #78 (November 2012)

McKeown, Jillian Mae and Michael Glover Smith. "He Said/She Said Director Profile: John Carpenter." White City Cinema (August 13, 2012)

Muncer, Mike, et al. "Slashers, Pt. 14: Conclusion." Evolution of Horror (December 15, 2017)













Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Dialogic Cinephilia - May 15, 2019

Armstrong, Sally, Paul Heinbecker and James Orbinski. "Five Freedoms: Freedom from Want." Ideas (April 11, 2019) ["Poverty has always been a defining issue in the quest to build a better world. Most political systems lay claim to the idea that they alone can create a better world. It's a kind of litmus test: if our political systems can't raise almost everyone out of relative poverty, then what exactly have we achieved? Why poverty exists at all in otherwise wealthy, prosperous democratic countries is a very incisive question, and it's not enough to just shrug and say our system is still better than any other alternative. And those alternatives? Dictatorships take us into the abyss. Right-wing libertarianism has little to offer as solutions to poverty. Soviet-style Communism didn't exactly work either, which leaves some version of western liberal democracy, either what we have now, or some variation that is still to emerge. So once we've got past that, and accepted that we've failed on the poverty file, how do we go about making things more equitable right now, making sure that wealth is distributed to those in need, and creating opportunity for the weak to become stronger?"]

Beloff, Zoe, J. Hoberman and Nicolas Rapold. "Art and Fascism." Film Comment Podcast (February 27, 2019) ["This week, the Film Comment Podcast digs into Leni Riefenstahl’s Triumph of the Will and the ways in which the reputation of the notorious film—and that of its maker—have shifted over the years. In a feature article on the legendary Nazi-propaganda project in the latest issue of Film Comment, contributing editor J. Hoberman writes that, “Triumph of the Will is an organic product of cinema history, a synthesis of Metropolis’s monumental mass ornament, Potemkin’s pow, and Hollywood extravagance.” Once denounced as fascist propaganda, the film came to be celebrated as a masterpiece of formal daring in the 1960s and 1970s, a rehabilitation that culminated with Riefenstahl receiving a controversial tribute at the 1974 Telluride Film Festival. Film CommentEditor in Chief Nicolas Rapold is joined by Hoberman and filmmaker and professor Zoe Beloff for a discussion of the film’s relevance to the current historical moment (Steve Bannon and Roger Ailes are purportedly big fans) and the larger question of artistry in the service of evil."]

Chukwu, Chinonye. "Clemency." The Close-Up (March 29, 2019) ["The film is an enthralling drama anchored by a powerhouse performance from the great Alfre Woodard as a prison warden struggling with the morality of capital punishment after years of working on death row."]

Guisado, Angelo. "Necessary to the Security of a Free State." Current Affairs (May 8, 2019) ["On the history of the second amendment, white militias, and border vigilantism…"]









Monday, May 13, 2019

Dialogic Cinephilia - May 13, 2019

Claire Denis is the filmmaker I think of when I hear discussions of 'embodied cinema' - her aesthetic/style is all about bringing the intensity of human experience to the screen (whether in excitable moments or in the quiet stillness of reflection) and her/Godard's camera maps the body like a sensitive lover's caress. Juliette Binoche is one of the best actresses of the 21st Century and powerfully captures/releases the desires, fear, anxieties and hopes of her character. A great character study and exploration of the rational/irrational human desire to feel/connect.





Banaji, Mahzarin and Michael Rosenfled. "Radically Normal: How Gay Rights Activists Changed The Minds Of Their Opponents." Hidden Brain (April 8, 2019)

Cornum, Lou and Nick Estes. "Red Planet." The New Inquiry (May 8, 2019) ["An interview with Nick Estes about his new book, Our History is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance."]

"Costs of War." Watson Institute of International Relations at Brown University (2019 Report)

Crisis In Democracy: Renewing Trust in America. Aspen Institute, 2019. ["The Report of the Knight Commission on Trust, Media and Democracy."]

Klein, Naomi. The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism. Metropolitan Books, 2007.

Koresky, Michael and Jeff Reichert. "This Means War! Introduction." Reverse Shot (June 23, 2003) ["Project for a New American Criticism,Or: How We Learned to Stop Worrying and Hate the War."]

Petzold, Christian. "Transit." The Close-Up (February 27, 2019) ["The internationally acclaimed cinema of German director Christian Petzold returns to the Film Society this Friday with Transit, a brilliant and haunting story of a European refugee who arrives in Marseille assuming the identity of a dead novelist after escaping two concentration camps."]

Shure, Natalie. "Sex Workers' Rights are Workers' Rights." Jacobin (May 1, 2019) ["Sex workers don’t need saving. They need what every other worker needs: the power to dictate the terms of their labor."]





Sunday, May 12, 2019

Slurring Bee #23

Also need 15 absurd/quirky warm up questions

1st Round: warm-up question followed by a word
2nd Round: 3 words in succession for each contestant
3rd Round: Round-robin until we have a winner (keep track of last three - the order they come in)
3 mispelled words and a contestant is out

Pronouncer Information 1. Read carefully the Judges, Recorders, Spellers and Audiences information that is included in the Scripps pronouncers’ guide. 2. Familiarize yourself with all words on the confidential word list. Pronunciation is important. A meeting with the judges to insure pronunciation of words and procedures will be scheduled prior to the Bee beginning. 3. Speak clearly for contestants, judges and audience alike. Grant all requests to repeat a word until the judges agree that the word has been made reasonably clear to the speller. You may request the speller to speak more clearly or louder. 4. “Pace” yourself. You need time to focus attention on the pronunciation of the new word and the judges need a few moments between each contestant to do their tasks.



Speller’s Information 1. Each speller needs to focus on the Pronouncer, to aid his or her hearing and understanding of the context of the word. A speller may ask for the word to be repeated, for its use in a sentence, for a definition, for the part of speech, and for the language of origin. 2. Each speller should pronounce the word before and after spelling it. If the speller fails to pronounce the word after spelling it, the judge may ask if they are finished. If they say yes, the judge will remind the speller to remember to repeat the word the next time. (No speller will be eliminated for failing to pronounce a word.) 3. When a speller is at the podium spelling, the next speller should be standing at a marked location ready to proceed to the podium.



519) interregnum

520) sequela

521) scurrilous

522) vituperative

523) extrajudicial

524) accolade

525) recipient

526) beneficiary

527) legatee

528) ephemeral

529) latinx

530) Gobbledygook

531) bureaucracy

532) 


More:

Thursday, May 9, 2019

Dialogic Cinephilia - May 9, 2019

Immerwahr, Daniel. "Empire State of Mind." On the Media (April 5, 2019) ["Recently, a member of the Trump administration called Puerto Rico “that country,” obscuring once more the relationship between the island colony and the American mainland. In a special hour this week, On the Media examines the history of US imperialism — and why the familiar US map hides the true story of our country. Brooke spends the hour with Northwestern University historian Daniel Immerwahr, author of How to Hide an Empire: A History of the Greater United States."]

McCalla, Leyla. "Leyla McCalla has The Capitalist Blues." World Cafe (May 8, 2019)

Raworth, Kate. "Doughnut Economics." The Next System #2 (August 23, 2017) ["Adam talks with Kate Raworth about her Doughnut Economics model. The pair discuss economic justice, unpaid labor, the commons, and much more."]

Transit (Germany: Christian Petzold, 2018) Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)





Trailer: Don't Get Trouble in Your mind from Fretless Films on Vimeo.








LITTLE MISS WESTIE Trailer from Oh, MY! Productions on Vimeo.




Tuesday, May 7, 2019

Transit (Germany: Christian Petzold, 2018)





Transit (Germany: Christian Petzold, 2018: 101 mins)

Barsanti, Chris. "Transit Is a Surreal Romance for a Scary Time." Pop Matters (February 28, 2019)

Chang, Justin. "Christian Petzold’s thriller Transit is hauntingly suspended between past and present." Los Angeles Times (March 6, 2019)

Ehrlich, David. "Transit: Christian Petzold’s Beguiling Refugee Romance Is Like a Kafkaesque ‘Casablanca.'" IndieWire (February 17, 2018)

Eggert, Brian. "Transit."  Deep Focus Review (March 18, 2019)

Fraga, Victor. "Transit." Dirty Movies (February 17, 2018) ["Just a little bit of history repeating? Audacious German film transposes Holocaust novel from 1942 onto modern Marseilles; the outcome is odd and yet bewitching - from the Berlinale."]

Garcia, Lawrence. "Lines of Flight—Christian Petzold’s Transit." Notebook (March 1, 2019)

LaGambina, Greg. "Films Without Borders: An Interview with Christian Petzold." Los Angeles Review of Books (May 6, 2019)
Petzold, Christian. "On Transit, the Refugee Crisis, The Sopranos, and Cinematic Rules." The Film Stage (March 13, 2018)

---. "Transit." The Close-Up (February 27, 2019) ["The internationally acclaimed cinema of German director Christian Petzold returns to the Film Society this Friday with Transit, a brilliant and haunting story of a European refugee who arrives in Marseille assuming the identity of a dead novelist after escaping two concentration camps."]

Poncavage, Joanna. "Transit: Classic 1940s Refugee Novel Now a Film." Booktrib (February 14, 2019)

Swanson, Anna. "How Transit Changes Our Understanding of the Ghost Story." Film School Rejects (March 3, 2019)










Dialogic Cinephilia - May 7, 2019

Crimmins, Timothy. "Stretching the Veil." The Point #18 (Winter 2019) [On environmentalist/conservationist embrace of anti-immigration policies and their later rejection of these policies (if not acceptance of open borders theories).]

Dallas, Paul. "Elementary Force: Claire Denis on High Life." Filmmaker (March 14, 2019)

LaGambina, Greg. "Films Without Borders: An Interview with Christian Petzold." Los Angeles Review of Books (May 6, 2019)

Miller, Daegan. "Toward a Useful Ignorance: From Connection to Coexistence." The Point #18 (Winter 2019) [Powerful philosophical/environmental/literary/nemophilist meditation ... Check out the link to the extensive bibliography linked at the end of the essay.]

Nayman, Adam. "On the Nightshift: An Interview with Claire Denis." Reverse Shot (June 26, 2009)




O'Malley, Sheila. "I Know Where I'm Going." Film Comment (May/June 2019)
["In Joanna Hogg’s sublime breakout The Souvenir, a budding artist strives to stay true to her path despite a consuming romance."]

Shapiro, Art, et al. "Working with the Earth." The Point #18 (Winter 2019) ["This fall and winter we invited people who work with the land—farmers, ranchers, foresters, ecologists and others—to tell us what they think the earth is for. What follows is a selection of the responses we received."]




Wide ranging documentary centered around the life of this unique artist. Jeffrey Wolf explores the historical context of and through Traylor's life journey which paralleled some of the major historical events/movements of the 19th/20th century - born into slavery in 1853 on a cotton plantation in Alabama, a tenant farmer after emancipation, father to nine children, witness to Reconstruction, the Jim Crow era, and the Great Migration. He drew upon a lifetime of memories for over a 1,000 drawings. This documentary effectively and powerfully moves back-and-forth, and through, the individual in relation to the broader society, and the society's effect on individuals. -- MB


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Bill Traylor: Chasing Ghosts Trailer from jeffrey wolf on Vimeo.




Sunday, May 5, 2019

Dialogic Cinephilia - May 5, 2019

Ahmed, Nafees. "First Reformed (2018): Spiritual Collapse Under Crisis of Faith." High on Films (August 14, 2018)

Archibald, Sasha. "The Exception: Restoring Lois Weber." The Point #18 (Winter 2019)

Barrouquere, Brett. "Two Members of Rise Above Movement Plead Guilty in Charlottesville 'Unite the Right' Rioting Case." Hatewatch (May 3, 2019)

Dutta, Debopriyaa. "The Viewer in Kubrickland: Solving Stanley Kubrick's Hermeneutic Labyrinth." High on Films (June 22, 2017)

Full Metal Jacket (UK/USA: Stanley Kubrick, 1987) Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

Haankes, Keegan, Rachel Janik and Michael Edison Hayden. "Shooting at Poway Synagogue Underscores Link Between Internet Radicalization and Violence." Hatewatch (April 28, 2019)

Haverty-Stacke, Donna. "Mayday, May Day." On the Media (April 26, 2019) ["International Workers' Day is celebrated with rallies and protests all over the world on May 1st, but it's not a big deal in the United States. Last May, Brooke spoke with Donna Haverty-Stacke of Hunter College, CUNY about the American origin of May Day — and about how it has come to be forgotten. The first national turnout for worker's rights in the U.S. was on May 1, 1886; contrary to what you may have heard elsewhere, it wasn't the same thing as the Haymarket Affair. Haverty-Stacke is also author of America’s Forgotten Holiday: May Day and Nationalism, 1867–1960, and she explains that the fight over May 1st, or May Day, is also about the fight for American identity and what it means to be radical and patriotic at the same time."]

Hayden, Michael Edison. "Prolific Alt-Right Propagandist's Identity Confirmed." Hatewatch (May 1, 2019)

Jones, Kent. "Intolerance: On Westerns in general, John Ford’s in particular, and why Quentin Tarantino shouldn’t teach film history." Film Comment (May/June 2013)

Stangler, Cole. "Yellow Vests and the 'Grand Debate' in France." Democracy Works (February 25, 2019) ["The yellow vest movement, named for the safety vests that all drivers are required to carry in their cars, began in late 2018 over rising gas prices. The movement succeeded in having the gas tax repealed, but the protestors still took to the streets around the country every weekend. Why? Like a lot of social movements, it’s complicated. Cole has been on the ground covering the movement and joins to discuss its origins, the reaction from President Emmanuel Macron, and where things might go from here."]

White, Courtney. "Conservation's Radical Center." The Point #18 (Winter 2019)

Saturday, May 4, 2019

ENG 282: 1910s

1910:

1911:

1912:

1913:

The Student of Prague (Germany: Stellan Rye, 1913: 83 mins)

Brockmann, Stephen. "Der Student von Prag (1913) and Learning to Look." A Critical History of German Film Rochester, NY: Camden House, 2010: 29-39. [Professor has copy of the book]

1914:

1915:

Hypocrites (USA: Lois Weber, 1915: 54 mins)

Archibald, Sasha. "The Exception: Restoring Lois Weber." The Point #18 (Winter 2019)

1916:

Intolerance (USA: D.W. Griffith, 1916: 197 mins)

LoBrutto, Vincent. "Parallel Stroytelling: Intolerance." Becoming Film Literate: The Art and Craft of Motion Pictures. Westport, CT: Praeger, 2005: 164-169. [BCTC Library: PN1994 L595 2005]

Shoes (USA: Lois Weber, 1916: 60 mins)

Archibald, Sasha. "The Exception: Restoring Lois Weber." The Point #18 (Winter 2019)


1917:

1918:

1919:

ENG 281 & ENG 282: Course Plans



Future Courses and Film Society screenings:

Around the World in 15 Films (1)

Around the World in 15 Films (2)

Around the World in 15 Films (3)

Around the World in 15 Films (4)

Around the World in 15 Films (5)

20th Century World Cinema (1)

Around the World in 15 Films (6)

Around the World in 15 Films (7)

Around the World in 15 Films (8)

"20th Century World Cinema (2)."

Around the World in 15 Films (9)

Around the World in 15 Films (10)

Around the World in 15 Films (11)

20th Century World Cinema (3)

Around the World in 15 Films (12)

Around the World in 15 Films (13)

Around the World in 15 Films (14)

Around the World in 15 Film (15)

Full Metal Jacket (UK/USA: Stanley Kubrick, 1987)






Full Metal Jacket (UK/USA: Stanley Kubrick, 1987: 116 mins)

Beyl, Cameron. "The Directors Series: Stanley Kubrick, Pts. 1-5." The Film Stage (February 11, 2015)

Bisson, Joseph E. "Irruptions of the Sacred in a 'World of Shit': Profanity, Sacred Words, and Cinematic Hierophanies in Stanley Kubrick’s Full Metal Jacket (1987)." The Journal of Religion and Film 16.1 (April 2012)

Brooke, John T. "Full Metal Jacket Video Essay." (Posted on Youtube: January 10, 2016)

Canby, Vincent. "Full Metal Jacket." The New York Times (June 26, 1987)

DeFreece, James. "Full Metal Jacket (1987)." Philosophical Films (ND)

Dutta, Debopriyaa. "The Viewer in Kubrickland: Solving Stanley Kubrick's Hermeneutic Labyrinth." High on Films (June 22, 2017)

Ebert, Roger. "Full Metal Jacket." Chicago Sun-Times (June 26, 1987)

Edelman, David Louis. "Full Metal Jacket: The Jungian Thing." (Personal Website: October 29, 2007)

Fenwick, James, I.Q. Hunter and Elisa Pezzota. "Stanley Kubrick: A Retrospective. Introduction." Cinergie (December 4, 2017)

Figueras, Mark Anthony. "Kubrick in Color." (Posted on Vimeo: January 2016)

Grossman, Barbara. "On the Selection and Placement of Anachronistic Top 40 Songs in Kubrick’s Full Metal Jacket." (Posted on Letterboxd: February 4, 2016)

Hancock, James, Matthew Modine and Adam Rackoff. Matthew Modine and the 30th Anniversary of Full Metal Jacket." Wrong Reel #286 (June 2017)

Johan, Allan, et al. "My Take on the Supposedly Inner Meaning Behind Full Metal Jacket." (Group discussion in True Film on Reddit: 2015)

Kaneria, Rishi. "Red: A Kubrick Supercut." (Posted on Vimeo: 2015)

Krohn, Bill. "Full Metal Jacket."  Zone 6: Incorporations ed. Jonathan Crary and Sanford Kwinter. New York: Urzone inc, 1992: 428–435.

Laity, Adam. "The Role of Landscape, Nature and Environment in War Films." (Posted on Vimeo: 2012)

McDougall, Sean. "A Look Inside Full Metal Jacket." (Posted on Youtube: December 4, 2012)

Nugent, Jack. "The Art of (Anti-)War." (Posted on Youtube: July 21, 2015)

Phipps, Zane. "Questioning Reality in Stanley Kubrick's Full Metal Jacket."  George Mason University (ND)

Pulver, Andrew. "Stanley Kubrick: film's obsessive genius rendered more human." The Guardian (April 26, 2019)

Swofford, Anthony. "Full Metal Jacket Seduced My Generation and Sent Us to War." The New York Times (April 18, 2018)
















Friday, May 3, 2019

Dialogic Cinephilia - May 3, 2019

Cuarón, Alfonso and Kent Jones. "Roma." The Close-Up #215 (February 20, 2019) 

Dueñas, Jessica and Kelly Holstine. "We Can’t Back People Who Hate Our Kids: Kentucky & Minnesota Teachers of Year Boycott Trump Meeting." Democracy Now (May 3, 2019) ["We speak with two award-winning teachers who are trying to teach Trump a lesson. On Monday, Jessica Dueñas, the 2019 Kentucky Teacher of the Year, and Kelly Holstine, the 2018 Minnesota Teacher of the Year, boycotted a White House ceremony honoring them and other state winners of the award in protest of the Trump administration’s education policies. But Dueñas and Holstine skipped the event to register their opposition to Trump’s policies on immigration, education and LGBTQ rights, saying many of the White House policies directly impact their immigrant and refugee students."]

Indigenous Cultures and Issues Dialogic Cinephilia (Ongoing Archive)

Jhally, Sut and Rachel Weber. "Mass. Judge Refuses to Halt Pro-Palestinian Event at UMass Featuring Roger Waters & Linda Sarsour." Democracy Now (May 3, 2019) ["“Not Backing Down: Israel, Free Speech, and the Battle for Palestinian Human Rights.” That’s the title of an event set to take place Saturday at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. After three anonymous UMass students filed a lawsuit to stop the event, a judge ruled Thursday the event can proceed, saying, “There’s nothing that comes even close to a threat of harm or incitement to violence or lawlessness.” Part Two: "Roger Waters on Palestine: “You Have to Stand Up for People’s Human Rights All Over the World."" ]

Koski, Genevieve, et al. "Ready Player One / Tron (Part 1)." The Next Picture Show #122 (April 3, 2018) ["Steven Spielberg’s new READY PLAYER ONE turns videogaming into both a fantasy adventure and a meta-narrative about adventure fantasies, a premise that feels directly inspired — and given Ernest Cline’s source novel, almost certainly is — by Steven Lisberger’s 1982 Disney oddity TRON. Before digging into what connects the two films, we dive into TRON’s glow-y, rudimentarily CGI-ed mainframe to consider the bits and bytes that drive this fascinatingly flawed film, from its confusing religious undertones (overtones?) to its strange real world/virtual world disconnect."]

---. "Ready Player One / Tron (Part 2)." The Next Picture Show #123 (April 5, 2018) ["Steven Lisberger’s groundbreaking live-action Disney film TRON is one of the few 1980s properties that doesn’t get explicitly referenced in Steven Spielberg’s new adaptation of Ernest Cline’s novel READY PLAYER ONE, but the earlier film makes up a significant portion of RP1’s source code. After discussing our reactions to READY PLAYER ONE, and hashing out what made Cline’s novel become so strangely controversial, we look at what connects and distinguishes these two films about life inside a video game, from their attitudes about human/computer relationships to how they approach the idea of corporate control."]

Lee, Spike and Lawrence O'Donnell. "On Blackkklansman." Film Comment Podcast (February 22, 2019) [" ... an extended conversation between Lee and Emmy Award–winning writer and television host Lawrence O’Donnell (The West Wing, MSNBC), followed by a screening of BlacKkKlansman, presented by Film Comment. In the course of the conversation, Lee discusses the genesis of BlacKkKlansman, how he chooses collaborators, and what it would mean to him to win an Oscar for the film. Nominated for six Academy Awards, including Best Director, BlacKkKlansman tells the story of Ron Stallworth (John David Washington), the first African-American detective to serve in the Colorado Springs Police Department, who bravely sets out on a dangerous mission to infiltrate and expose the Ku Klux Klan. In a feature on the film in the July-August 2018 issue of Film Comment, Teo Bugbee writes that, “BlacKkKlansman is no straight biopic. Instead, it follows the beats of a traditional cop movie, where a man of the law is torn between allegiances in his efforts to solve a case. In this regard, the film represents the latest chapter in the underrated career of Spike Lee, genre filmmaker.”"]












Thursday, May 2, 2019

Indigenous/Native American: Histories & Cultures (Ongoing Archive)


This Video Essay Was Not Built on an Ancient Burial Ground from Offscreen on Vimeo.



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Aguilar, Carlos. "Embrace of the Serpent Dir. Ciro Guerra on Indigenous Knowledge & the Amazon in Black-and-White." IndieWire (February 19, 2016)

Apple, Fiona and Eryn Wise. "In Her Own Words: Fiona Apple on New Album Fetch the Bolt Cutters & Acknowledging Indigenous Lands." Democracy Now (April 28, 2020) ["In a broadcast exclusive, world-renowned singer-songwriter Fiona Apple joins Democracy Now! for the hour to discuss her critically acclaimed new album, “Fetch the Bolt Cutters,” which was released early amid the pandemic. “I’ve heard that it’s actually making people feel free and happy,” Apple says, “and it might be helping people feel alive or feel their anger or feel creative. And that’s the best thing that I could hope for.” Her record includes an acknowledgment that the album was “Made on unceded Tongva, Mescalero Apache, and Suma territories.” We also speak with Native American activist Eryn Wise, an organizer with Seeding Sovereignty, an Indigenous-led collective that launched a rapid response initiative to help Indigenous communities affected by the outbreak."]

Baraka, Ajamu, Eli Kane and Pamela Spees. "Pipeline Resistance Groups and the film On A Knife Edge; Perpetual War and the Anti-War Movement." Law and Disorder (March 18, 2018) ["Pipeline Resistance Groups and the film On A Knife Edge: It’s now more than one year since law enforcement evicted the last Dakota Access Pipeline resistance camps. The pipeline was near completion and was supposed to cross sacred Indian land in South Dakota in order to bring Canadian tar sand oil from north to south through the United States. Then the project was stalled by a tremendous solidarity movement lead by indigenous peoples along with their allies only to be green lighted by the newly elected Trump administration which has proven to be a handmaiden of the fossil fuel industry. Guest – Eli Kane, a Brooklyn-based producer who has worked in film and music for 15 years. He has made two other documentaries for PBS about land rights and food sovereignty, including Land Rush, which won a Peabody Award in 2013. Guest – Attorney Pamela Spees is an attorney with the Center for Constitutional Rights and represents environmental justice groups opposing the efforts of Tigerswan, a private military company which worked with corporate and governmental entities at Standing Rock in an attempt to suppress the movement against the pipeline, to operate in Louisiana."]

Bardenwerper, Will, Stan Brewer and Tucker Malarkey. "Wild Ecologies: So Go the Salmon, So Go the World." Fiction/Non/Fiction (November 19, 2019) ["In this episode, writers Tucker Malarkey and Will Bardenwerper, as well as rancher, rider, and member of the Oglala Sioux tribe Stan Brewer talk about their connections to the natural world. Malarkey talks about efforts to save wild salmon, their vital role in the ecosystem of the Pacific Northwest, and how relations between the US and Russia on this issue might provide insight on global climate change cooperation. Bardenwerper and Brewer, the first writer-source duo to appear on the show together, discuss Indian relay horse racing, and horses’ importance to the Lakota community."]

Bourgeois, Robyn and Marion Buller. "Damning Canadian Inquiry Calls the Murder and Disappearance of Indigenous Women & Girls Genocide." Democracy Now (June 4, 2019) ["A chilling national inquiry has determined that the frequent and widespread disappearance and murder of indigenous girls and women in Canada is a genocide that the government itself is responsible for. The findings were announced by the Canadian National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls at a ceremony on Monday with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the families of victims. Many in the audience held red flowers to commemorate the dead. The national inquiry was convened after the body of 15-year-old Tina Fontaine from the Sagkeeng First Nation was found in the Red River in Winnipeg, Manitoba, in 2014. The report follows decades of anguish and anger as indigenous communities have called for greater attention to the epidemic of dead and missing indigenous women, girls and two-spirit, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, intersex and asexual people. Some 1,500 family members of victims and survivors gave testimony to the commission, painting a picture of violence, state-sanctioned neglect, and “pervasive racist and sexist stereotypes” that led nearly 1,200 indigenous women and girls to die or go missing between 1980 and 2012. Indigenous activists say this number could be a massive undercount, as many deaths go unreported and unnoticed. We speak with Marion Buller, chief commissioner of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, and Robyn Bourgeois, assistant professor in the Centre for Women’s and Gender Studies at Brock University."]

Brennan, Jason, Braden Te Hiwi and Justin Louis. "This Game We Love On Stolen Land." Changing on the Fly #1 (October 3, 2018) ["On this episode, we lace up the skates and hit the ice to talk about colonialism in hockey, and the Indigenous hockey experience. What does it mean to call hockey “Canada’s game” while Canada is a country built on stolen Native land? We’re gonna take a deep dive into hockey’s role in Canada’s residential schools, the presence of Native mascots in sports, and the changing role of Indigenous hockey players in the NHL today."]

Brown, Monica. "First indigenous map of its kind; U.S. map displays 'Our own names and locations.'" Tulalip News (May 22, 2013)

Cadena, Nicolas. "Embrace of the Serpent: Reframing the Colombian Amazon." NACLA (April 8, 2016)

Cornum, Lou and Nick Estes. "Red Planet." The New Inquiry (May 8, 2019) ["An interview with Nick Estes about his new book, Our History is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance."]

Dickey, Colin. "The Suburban Horror of the Indian Burial Ground." The New Republic (October 19, 2016) ["In the 1970s and 1980s, homeowners were terrified by the idea that they didn't own the land they'd just bought."]

Dunbar-Ortiz, Roxanne. "In Conversation with Nick Estes." Lannan Lectures (October 11, 2017) ["Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz is known for her lifelong commitment to national and international social justice issues. She has been active in the international Indigenous movement for more than four decades, working with Indigenous communities on sovereignty and land rights and helping to build the international Indigenous movement. She is Professor Emerita of Ethnic Studies at California State University, East Bay. She is the author of numerous books and articles on indigenous peoples’ right to self-determination, including Roots of Resistance: A History of Land Tenure in New Mexico, The Great Sioux Nation, and An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States, which received the 2015 American Book Award. A new book, Loaded: A Disarming History of the Second Amendment is forthcoming in January."]

---. An Indigenous Peoples' History of America. Beacon Press, 2014: 1-14; 133-161. ["Today in the United States, there are more than five hundred federally recognized Indigenous nations comprising nearly three million people, descendants of the fifteen million Native people who once inhabited this land. The centuries-long genocidal program of the US settler-colonial regimen has largely been omitted from history. Now, for the first time, acclaimed historian and activist Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz offers a history of the United States told from the perspective of Indigenous peoples and reveals how Native Americans, for centuries, actively resisted expansion of the US empire. With growing support for movements such as the campaign to abolish Columbus Day and replace it with Indigenous Peoples’ Day and the Dakota Access Pipeline protest led by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States is an essential resource providing historical threads that are crucial for understanding the present. In An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States, Dunbar-Ortiz adroitly challenges the founding myth of the United States and shows how policy against the Indigenous peoples was colonialist and designed to seize the territories of the original inhabitants, displacing or eliminating them. And as Dunbar-Ortiz reveals, this policy was praised in popular culture, through writers like James Fenimore Cooper and Walt Whitman, and in the highest offices of government and the military. Shockingly, as the genocidal policy reached its zenith under President Andrew Jackson, its ruthlessness was best articulated by US Army general Thomas S. Jesup, who, in 1836, wrote of the Seminoles: “The country can be rid of them only by exterminating them.” Spanning more than four hundred years, this classic bottom-up peoples’ history radically reframes US history and explodes the silences that have haunted our national narrative."]

---. "Sanitizing Our Settler-Colonial Past With ‘Nation of Immigrants’ Narratives." Citations Needed #62 (January 16, 2019) ["“The United States is a nation of immigrants.” It’s a phrase we hear constantly – often said with the best of intentions and, in today’s increasingly cruel environment, meant as a strong rebuke of Donald Trump and his white nationalist administration. The metaphor of the “melting pot” serves a similar purpose: the United States is strong and noble because we are a place that takes people in from across the globe, an inclusive, welcoming, compassionate in-gathering of humanity - e pluribus unum - "out of many, one." It’s a romantic idea – and often evoked as a counter to xenophobic, anti-immigrant rhetoric. But how historically accurate are these phrases and the national narratives they entrench? And what if, instead of combating white nationalism, they subtly promote it? On this episode, we dissect the notion that the United States is simply a rainbow collection of disparate groups coming together and breakdown how, in many ways, this absolves us of our past and present as a violent, white-settler colony."]

Dunbar-Ortiz, Roxanne and Abby Martin. "Native American Genocide & Resistance." Empire Files (November 25, 2015) ["Indigenous scholar Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, author of an ‘Indigenous People’s History of The United States’, joins Abby Martin for this week’s episode of The Empire Files to give insight on the history and present-day struggle of native peoples. Native society, despite pervasive mainstream mythology, was rich in agriculture and was advanced to such a degree that they were appropriated by colonialists. These civilizations were turned into slaves, bought and sold on the market and taken to work in mines and forcibly displaced so they did not have their housing or food supplies. The desire of the colonial forces was to weaken and control native populations so that could occupy and control the land, and use natives for slave labor. Dunbar-Ortiz discusses not only the intention of colonial forces, which included killing off cultural ties and languages, but how native people have survived despite widespread terror campaigns. Armed settlers had to fight against native people in order to maintain dominance. The Plains People, for example, had to endure a “food fight” involving their buffalo. The primary goal of a food fight was to kill off the food supply of civilians so that they starve or give in to the demands of occupying forces. Native resistance today has taken new, creative form—aimed at disrupting normalized dehumanization by the military establishment, sport establishment and school industries, all of which carry names and caricatures of natives which are deeply colonial and racist: from things like Tomahawk missiles to the Redskins sports team. Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and Abby Martin break down the colonialist fabrications which have long permeated our history books and follow through with how we can join the fight to amplify native voices."]

Dunbar-Ortiz, Roxanne, et al. "Taking the first steps of American imperialism (Native Peoples Series Part 3)." Best of the Left #1252 (February 26, 2019) ["Today we take a look at the process of systematic, government-sponsored genocide against the native peoples of North America that kicked off the wealth-accumulating, territory-expanding American empire we know and love today."]

Ellerby, Kara and Sumita Mukherjee. "How Empire Uses ‘Feminist’ Branding to Sell War and Occupation." Citations Needed #65 (February 6, 2019) ["Since the dawn of the American Empire, thin moral pretexts in our politics and press have been used to justify our wars and conquest. The invasion of Cuba and Philippines in 1898 was declared to be a fight for freedom from Spanish oppression. Vietnam was about stopping Communist tyranny. The pioneer myth of Manifest Destiny and “westward expansion” was built about “taming” and “civilizing’ the land from violent savages. But one current that flows through all of these imperial incursions has been the idea that the United States – as well as its allies the Great Britain and Israel – are out to protect women. Today's endless occupations in Syria, Iraq, and Afghanistan are, in large part, justified in perpetuity because the United States is a self-declared, unique protector of modernity and women’s rights. All the same, the Pentagon is increasingly promoted, in press releases and media puffy pieces, as a place where women can exercise their agency: the ultimate apex of meritocracy and a vanguard of equality. But what if this approach misses the point of equality altogether? What if this is simply a craven branding exercise, putting a liberal face on what is a fundamentally oppressive system of violence? On this episode, we explore various ways women’s rights and empowerment has been used to sell colonial objectives and how one can differentiate between actual progress and the superficial language of inclusion used cynically in service of mechanized violence."]

Estes, Nick. "Our History of the Future." Dig (June 29, 2019) ["Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance." Michael Benton -- This is one of the best discussions I have heard about indigenous cultures, settler colonialism, racism/apartheid in America and intergenerational indigenous resistance movements. I cannot laud this enough - totally revolutionized and extended my thinking/understanding of contemporary movements like Standing Rock and their place in the long history of intergenerational indigenous struggles against genocidal policies. I highly recommend this episode and check out The Dig podcast (they also just did an impressive 5 part episode on contemporary European politics)]

---. "Our History Is the Future: Lakota Historian Nick Estes on Thanksgiving & Indigenous Resistance." Democracy Now (November 28, 2019)

---. "Standing Rock and the History of Indigenous Resistance in America." BackStory (September 6, 2019) ["In 2016, protests broke out at Standing Rock – a reservation in North and South Dakota – to block the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. Indigenous peoples and other activists opposed the pipeline because they believed it violated sacred sites and threatened to contaminate the Missouri River, a major source of drinking water in the region. Taking social media by storm, the #noDAPL movement quickly became an international headline. On this episode, Nathan sits down with historian and activist Nick Estes to talk about his experience at Standing Rock, the history of Indigenous resistance, and the current state of the Dakota Access Pipeline. Estes’ new book is called Our History is the Future: Standing Rock versus the Dakota Access Pipeline and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance."]

Goulet, Danis, et al. "How Indigenous and black artists are using science fiction to imagine a better future." The Current (November 14, 2017)

Haaland, Deb. "One of Nation’s First Native Congresswomen, Calls for Probe of Missing Indigenous Women." Democracy Now (November 8, 2018) ["Two Native American women have made history in the midterms, becoming the nation’s first Native congresswomen. Democrat Sharice Davids won the 3rd Congressional District in Kansas, unseating Republican Kevin Yoder. In New Mexico, Democrat Deb Haaland won in the 1st Congressional District, defeating Republican Janice Arnold-Jones. They will join more than 100 women in the U.S. House of Representatives—another historic first. We speak to Deb Haaland about her plans for Congress, the crisis of missing and murdered Native American women around the country, and whether she’ll attempt to impeach Donald Trump."]

Hamilton-Diabo, Jonathan, et al. "The Path to Reconciliation in Education and Community Work." Needs No Introduction (June 28, 2018) ["The panel you'll hear on today's program is called Path to Reconciliation in Education and Community Work. Panelists discussed the meaning of reconciliation and the strategies and initiatives that have been undertaken by educational institutions and community agencies toward the deeper integration of Indigenous perspectives, practices, and pedagogies into the curriculum and culture of their organizations."]

Hugo, Kristin. "Indigenous people want to make Amazon rainforest world's biggest protected area." The Independent (November 21, 2018)

Immerwahr, Daniel. "Empire State of Mind." On the Media (April 5, 2019) ["Recently, a member of the Trump administration called Puerto Rico “that country,” obscuring once more the relationship between the island colony and the American mainland. In a special hour this week, On the Media examines the history of US imperialism — and why the familiar US map hides the true story of our country. Brooke spends the hour with Northwestern University historian Daniel Immerwahr, author of How to Hide an Empire: A History of the Greater United States."]

---. "'How to Hide an Empire': Daniel Immerwahr on the History of the Greater United States." Democracy Now (March 5, 2019) ["“How to Hide an Empire: A History of the Greater United States.” That’s the title of a new book examining a part of the U.S. that is often overlooked: the nation’s overseas territories from Puerto Rico to Guam, former territories like the Philippines, and its hundreds of military bases scattered across the globe. We speak with the book’s author, Daniel Immerwahr, who writes, “At various times, the inhabitants of the U.S. Empire have been shot, shelled, starved, interned, dispossessed, tortured and experimented on. What they haven’t been, by and large, is seen.” Immerwahr is an associate professor of history at Northwestern University."]

Joseph, Harry, Anne Rolfes and Pamela Spees. "Critics of Bayou Bridge Pipeline in Louisiana Decry State & Company Surveillance of Protesters." Democracy Now (March 13, 2018) ["In Louisiana, newly disclosed documents reveal a state intelligence agency regularly spied on activists opposing construction of the Bayou Bridge pipeline, which would carry nearly a half-million barrels of oil per day across Louisiana’s wetlands. The documents show the Louisiana Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness regularly drafted intelligence memos on anti-pipeline activists, including a gathering of indigenous-led water protectors who’ve set up a protest encampment along the pipeline’s route. Other newly revealed documents show close coordination between Louisiana regulators and the company building the pipeline, Energy Transfer Partners. This comes just one week after a U.S. district judge in Baton Rouge ordered a temporary injunction against construction of the Bayou Bridge pipeline in order to “prevent further irreparable harm” to the region’s delicate ecosystems, while court challenges proceed. For more, we speak with Pastor Harry Joseph of the Mount Triumph Baptist Church. We also speak with Pamela Spees of the Center for Constitutional Rights and Anne Rolfes, founding director of the Louisiana Bucket Brigade."]

Kaur, Harmeet. "The Cherokee Nation wants a representative in Congress, taking the US government up on a promise it made nearly 200 years ago." CNN (August 25, 2019)

Kernell, Amanda. "Sami Blood." Film School Radio (June 27, 2017) ["Sami Blood is the electrifying debut feature of writer/director Amanda Kernell. Based on her own grandmother’s life and set in 1930s Sweden during the pre-Nazi eugenics movement, Sami Blood follows Elle, a young indigenous Lapland girl made to feel like an inferior species when she’s subjected to indoctrination and race biology in a Swedish boarding school. Elle escapes, and in doing so is estranged from her sister, her family and her culture. Sami Blood is a unique and intimate perspective on the history of the Sami people, and tells a story of oppression that resonates across borders and generations. The film features a breakthrough performance from its young lead actress Lene Cecilia Sparrok, who has never acted before and is Sami herself. She stars in the film alongside her sister Mia Sparrok. Director and writer Amanda Kernell joins us to talk about her heart wrenching story of a young woman struggling to find a place in an increasingly hostile world."]

King, Charles. "How A Few 'Renegade' Thinkers Helped Usher In A New Era Of Anthropology." Fresh Air (August 20, 2019) ["In his new book, Gods of the Upper Air, Charles King tells the story of Franz Boas, Margaret Mead and the other 20th century anthropologists who challenged outdated notions of race, class and gender." MB - also classifications of primitive/civilized.]

Mathiesen, Karl. "Embrace of the Serpent Star: 'My Tribe is Nearly Extinct.'" The Guardian (June 8, 2016) ["Their land was plundered for rubber while they were enslaved or killed. As Embrace of the Serpent tells the shocking story of the tribespeople of Colombia, its star relives a moving screening in the heart of the jungle"]

Miller, Andrew. "'Our House Is On Fire': Brazil Faces Global Outrage as Massive Fires Spread in Amazon Rainforest." Democracy Now (August 23, 2019) ["The United Nations is calling for the protection of the Amazon amid fears that thousands of fires raging across Brazil and some parts of Bolivia are rapidly destroying the world’s largest rainforest and paving the way for a climate catastrophe. The fires have spread a vast plume of smoke across South America and the Atlantic Ocean that’s visible from space. They’re unprecedented in recorded history, and environmentalists say most of the fires were deliberately set by illegal miners and cattle ranchers. Indigenous people in Brazil have accused far-right President Jair Bolsonaro of encouraging the destruction. Bolsonaro has worked to deregulate and open up the Amazon for agribusiness, logging and mining since he came into office in January. We speak with Andrew Miller, advocacy director at Amazon Watch."]

Noisecat, Julian Brave and Anne Spice. "A History and Future of Resistance: The fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline is part of a centuries-long indigenous struggle against dispossession and capitalist expansionism." Jacobin (September 8, 2016)

Roehl, Emily. "Deep histories and fluid futures in Awake: A Dream from Standing Rock." Jump Cut #59 (Fall 2019) ["“I am not dreaming. I am awake. I have been woken by the spirit inside that demanded I open my eyes and see the world around me, see that my children’s future was imperiled. See that my life couldn’t wait in slumber anymore. See that I was honored to be among those who are awake, to be alive at this point in time, to see the rising of the Oceti Sakowin, to see the gathering of the nations and beyond that, the gathering of all races and all faiths. Will you wake up and dream with us? Will you join our dream? Will you join us?” - Floris White Bull"  To watch the film]

Talaga, Tanya. "Big Brother's Hunger." Ideas (March 25, 2019) ["In her 2018 CBC Massey Lectures series, titled All Our Relations: Finding the Path Forward, prize-winning journalist Tanya Talaga (author of Seven Fallen Feathers) explores the legacy of cultural genocide against Indigenous peoples."]

Waziyatawin and Michael Yellow Bird. "For Indigenous Eyes Only: Beginning Decolonization." (Excerpt from For Indigenous Eyes Only: A Decolonization Handbook Edited by Waziyatawin Angela Wilson and Michael Yellow Bird © 2005 School of American Research.)

Wente, Jesse. "Top Ten Indigenous Films of AllTime." CBC (October 22, 2014)

Williams, Jr., Robert A. "Moving beyond tragedy by surviving and adapting (Native Peoples Series Part 4)." Best of the Left #1265 (April 16, 2019) ["Today we take a look at just a few of the aspects of modern life for Native Peoples that we can see as stemming from the racism and colonialism that has been endemic in post-contact America."]